Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

U.S. Attorney In Idaho Retires After 20 Years At Office

The U.S. Attorney in Boise, Wendy Olson, is leaving her post Saturday after seven years in the top position and two decades with the office. Just two days before stepping down, Matt Guilhem spoke to Olson, an Idaho native, not just about her long career, but about her roots in the Gem State. Wendy Olson's last day on the job is February 25 . She'll be going into private practice at a Boise law firm. For more local news, follow the KBSX newsroom on Twitter @ KBSX915 Copyright 2017 Boise State...

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Twitter: @SenatorRisch

Senator Jim Risch proposed a novel idea for protecting the nation's power grid from cyber threats. The senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee thinks we should rely less on electronics and more on humans to manage the nation's electricity.

The Republican senator cited a 2015 cyber attack on Ukraine's power grid as evidence for his proposal. Power was cut to some 215,000 Ukranians in the incident, but the outage would've been even more widespread had humans not still been in physical control of some elements of the grid.

In a story Feb. 23 about a lawsuit involving a wolf- and coyote-shooting contest in Idaho, The Associated Press reported erroneously the disposition of the suit. The judge dismissed part of the lawsuit, not the entire lawsuit, and a decision on an action the groups have against the U.S. Forest Service involving Idaho for Wildlife's predator contest is pending.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

An informational hearing at the state capitol Wednesday centered on early childhood education.

The Senate Education Committee was scheduled to only hear about kindergarten and other early education resources for 20 minutes. However, questions from senators pushed the meeting to close to an hour.

Boise Parks and Recreation Department

If you’ve taken a stroll on the Boise Greenbelt in the last week or so, you’ve probably noticed a higher and faster river rushing past you. In just a few days, rocks in the river bed have been covered and large logs have been carried downstream.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

U.S. Representative Raul Labrador spoke to the Idaho House Wednesday about President Donald Trump.

The First District Republican gave a fifteen minute speech to members of Idaho’s House of Representatives. Labrador said he was concerned at the reaction to President Trump’s actions. Labrador said people are acting like Trump’s actions are unusual or illegitimate, when he’s just doing the things he said he would while campaigning.

Tom Banse

An environmental group has filed an appeal seeking to stop the construction of two high-voltage transmission lines in southwestern Idaho.

Western Watersheds Project filed the appeal late last week with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Board of Land Appeals concerning the Gateway West project.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management last month issued a formal decision approving a plan by Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power to build and operate 321 miles of 500-kilovolt transmission lines on public land in Idaho's Gooding, Elmore, Owyhee, Cassia and Twin Falls counties.

Idaho Ed News

Sen. Dean Mortimer has a $20.3 million plan to help schools cover health insurance costs.

Education groups are split on the idea. Depending on who you listen to, Mortimer’s plan could help schools attract and keep teachers. Or, it could exacerbate Idaho’s teacher shortage.

At some point, the Senate Education Committee will vote on the idea.

Mortimer, R-Idaho Falls, uses some complicated math to construct his Senate Bill 1096.

Karl Stanton / Flickr Creative Commons

With backlashes at townhall meetings held by congressional representatives across the country, Idaho’s own Congressional delegation isn’t setting any public meetings with constituents during the current recess.

There’s a missing persons campaign afoot for Idaho’s D.C. contingent.

Posters announcing a mock missing persons campaign for Idaho’s D.C. contingent are making the rounds on social media and on street lights in downtown Boise. The posters say: “Missing: Have You Seen This Man?” and feature pictures of Senator Mike Crapo or Senator Jim Risch.

wild horses, nevada, wildlife
James Marvin Phelps / Flickr Creative Commons

Federal officials say they plan to capture 150 wild horses starting later this month in central Idaho near Challis and remove about 50 for adoption.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management in a news release Tuesday says the capture will likely go through mid-April using a large-scale bait trap operation.

Officials say the Challis Wild Horse Herd Management Area is under a court decree to maintain wild horse numbers within appropriate management levels.

Officials say that number is up to 253 horses, but the current population is over 280 horses.

Idaho Division of Tourism / Flickr Creative Commons

In 1890, the brand new state of Idaho was granted more than four million acres of land by the federal government. Public education is the beneficiary of money generated from state land sales to individuals or companies. Idaho law limits these sales to no more than 320 acres in some cases and 160 acres in others.

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February 27 - March 3

Join Boise State Public Radio and Idaho Education News as we look at how the March 14 statewide school elections affect students, communities and taxpayers.

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Public Radio Journalist To Talk Podcasts & Storytelling In Boise

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