United States Forest Service, Mike McMillan / Flickr Creative Commons

Forest Service Expects Expensive Wildfire Season, Renews Call For New Funding Model

A recent report published by the U.S. Forest Service shows that in 1995, 17 percent of the agency's budget went to fighting wildfires. By 2014, those efforts took up 51 percent of the agency's funding. Forest Service spokesperson Jennifer Jones says that should change. Jones says fire suppression is funded by taking an average of the wildfire costs over the last 10 years, and then applying that to the agency's overall budget. She says that method doesn't really work in an era of large and...
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Growing Garden City

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Idaho water managers say they are conducting negotiations to prevent mass water shutoffs from Jerome to Idaho Falls even though a final deal could result in long-term farming changes for southern Idaho irrigators.

The Capital Press reports that groundwater irrigators have fallen short in providing enough water to two canal companies.

The canal companies are owed nearly 89,000 acre-feet of water because they own senior water rights. Senior water rights take priority in Idaho.

Gay marriage, couples, lawsuit
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Six same-sex couples in northern Idaho who received marriage licenses before state officials say a federal court made such unions legal are being given a unique state-approved opportunity for a do-over.

Northern Idaho officials are offering a marriage license application that has the unusual option of selecting already married.

The application available only to the six same-sex couples in Latah County who married in early October is intended to allow them to get a new application without denying they're already married.

The first genetically modified crop wasn't made by a megacorporation. Or a college scientist trying to design a more durable tomato. Nope. Nature did it — at least 8,000 years ago.

Well, actually bacteria in the soil were the engineers. And the microbe's handiwork is present in sweet potatoes all around the world today.

Police say a northern Idaho officer shot by a man who stole his patrol car has died of his injuries.

Coeur d'Alene Police Sgt. Christie Wood says Sgt. Greg Moore died Tuesday evening. Moore was shot around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday after checking on a suspicious person in a neighborhood.

Police arrested a 26-year-old man after a car chase that reached speeds of 125 mph. Jonathan Renfro appeared in court Tuesday and was ordered held on $2 million bail.

Moore was a 16-year veteran of the Coeur d'Alene Police Department.

A Coeur d'Alene committee is taking on the American classics.

A district curriculum review committee has recommended that John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" be removed from classroom instruction.

The Spokesman-Review reports that the school board will vote on the recommendation next month.

Review board member Mary Jo Finney cites the use of profanity and a negative story line as the reasons she objects to the 1937 book about two migrant ranch hands.

Six infants may have been exposed to the measles in a recent outbreak in the Spokane area, and 25 people are under quarantine.

From Wenatchee, Washington, to Bend, Oregon, whitewater rafting guides are preparing for a flood of business as school lets out. But this year’s low snowpack could mean less whitewater and more demand for trips.

Ben Amstutz / Flickr Creative Commons

Skinny Dipper hot springs was illegally built in the 1990s and now the Bureau of Land Management is dismantling the popular site.

Skinny Dipper is located about an hour outside Boise off the Banks-to-Lowman highway. The site is a half mile hike up a steep trail, and the pools overlook the Payette River.

The plan is to remove the pools and reseed the area, closing the trails in the area for five years to try and get the landscape back to a more natural state.

A bill that would require criminal background checks for private gun sales in Oregon is on its way to the governor's desk. The Oregon House narrowly passed the measure Monday.

Larry Craig
Joe Jaszewski / The Idaho Statesman

Federal election regulators have sent former U.S. Sen. Larry Craig a warning letter that he failed to submit financial disclosure documents.

The Federal Election Commission says Craig failed to report his April quarterly finances.

Craig told The Associated Press that he submitted the report Monday.

The Idaho Republican says he has continued to file quarterly reports — despite leaving office in 2009 — because of his legal battles over his use of campaign funds.

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