Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Boise Unveils Promised Plan To Permanently House The Homeless

The City of Boise and a handful of nonprofit and public sector partners Tuesday announced a new program to house the area’s chronically homeless population. The plan would first put 15 homeless people in existing apartments for a cost of about $300,000 a year. Those would be owned by the city, the county housing authority and private landlords. KBSX previewed this plan in October. Phase two would build a 25-unit apartment complex. The Idaho Housing and Finance Association has put out a reques...
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Dan and Dennis Robbins / via Boise National Weather Service Facebook page

Photo Of Idaho "Snow Doughnuts" Goes Viral

Republicans in the Idaho and Washington legislatures want to block any more cities from going the path of Seattle and Tacoma in raising the minimum wage locally. In Boise Tuesday, a House committee introduced a state preemption bill.

Jim Peaco | Yellowstone National Park / Flickr Creative Commons

Federal wildlife services and Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials have joined forces to kill wolves in the Clearwater Region for the third year in a row.

The Lewiston Tribune reports that elk herds have been struggling in the remote country for nearly two decades.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A newly published study looks closely at one of the most beloved rivers in Idaho. The Big Wood River runs through the heart of Blaine County. The waterway is used for recreation and it helps fuel the county’s agricultural producers.

Bogus Basin, ski
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

As part of a new pricing structure for Bogus Basin Ski Resort, managers recently announced new partnerships with Tamarack and Soldier Mountain. Starting next winter Bogus season pass owners will get some time at Tamarack and vice versa.

Jeffrey Johnson

There’s a volcano in Guatemala that erupts on a regular basis, so regular that some scientists call it the “Old Faithful” of volcanoes. That makes it very popular with people who study volcanoes, like Boise State Professor Jeffrey Johnson.

Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, Johnson recently led 60 researchers from Mexico, France, Italy and the United Kingdom to conduct different studies on the volcano. He returned last month and says the work being done in Guatemala could someday help scientists better predict how other volcanoes will behave.

Courtesy of SeAnne Safaii

At any given time, there are about 450,000 centenarians in the world. Some countries like Italy, Japan and Singapore have more than their fair share. SeAnne Safaii, an associate professor at the University of Idaho’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and dietician Sue Linja set out to find out why. They spent the past year interviewing centenarians in those countries and here in the United States.

Jesse Michael Nix / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Girl Scouts would get a tax break on each box of Thin Mints under legislation introduced in a House committee.

The House Revenue and Tax Committee introduced a bill Monday that would exempt Girl and Boy Scouts' food programs from the state sales tax.

Republican Rep. Janet Trujillo of Idaho Falls says the tax break would allow scout programs to thrive but would take about $210,000 in scout-generated sales tax revenue from state general funds.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

On any given day, several hundred prisoners of the state of Idaho are housed in county jails. For the last half year it averages to more than 630, and the state paid the counties about $1 million a month to keep them. They’re there for short stays, like if someone violates parole or has just been sentenced and it might take some time to get his or her spot ready at the state prison. 

Amelia Templeton / OPB

Oregon conservation groups say volunteers are lining up to help reverse damage done to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge during the ongoing occupation.  

At the end of January, the Oregon Natural Desert Association put out a call for volunteers interested in doing environmental restoration at the refuge after the occupation is over. In just a week, more than 600 people from all over the Northwest have signed up.  

J Biochemist / Flickr Creative Commons

A bill that would allow public utilities to keep blueprints and other documents secret from the public has passed is first hurdle in the Idaho Legislature.

The House State Affairs Committee introduced the measure Friday.

The proposal would exempt the public from seeing emergency response plans, computer and telecommunication systems and building blueprints.

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