The Nature Conservancy

Conservation Fund That Created Many Idaho Special Places In Limbo

Since Congress let the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) expire in September, conservationists have been trying to get it re-authorized. This obscure federal fund takes a portion of the proceeds from offshore oil and gas drilling and puts them into conservation projects. Restoring the original fund has broad support in Congress, but there are some lawmakers who would like to change how the money gets used. They argue too much of the funding has gone into federal land acquisition, and...
Read More
Bogus Basin, ski
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Bogus Basin has announced the hiring of its next general manager. Brad Wilson will begin work on November 9. His selection was announced Monday afternoon by the Bogus Basin board of directors.

Wilson replaces former president and general manager Alan Moore, who retired at the end of the February.

Wilson brings to Boise several decades’ worth of experience in the ski and resort industry.

According to an industry trade group, sales of alternatives to modern wheat are growing at double-digit annual rates.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Read more about the homeless camp near downtown Boise here.

Find Adam Cotterell on Twitter @cotterelladam

Copyright 2015 Boise State Public Radio

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The issue of homelessness in Boise has been in the news a lot lately. The city recently won a court victory in defense of its anti-camping ordinance.  At the same time, a large homeless encampment in an alley called Cooper Court has grown not far from the heart of town.

Idaho Education News


Linda Clark has resigned abruptly — and effective immediately — as superintendent of the West Ada School District.

telephone, buttons, hotline
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

October 15 marked the one year anniversary of the legalization of same-sex marriage in Idaho. KBSX recently shared an interview with two Boise women who'd sued the state over the issue. Rachel and Amber Beierle talked about how their lives had changed since the decision. Since then, we've asked listeners to call in and offer their thoughts on the issue. 

Here is a sample of those responses. The comments have been edited for brevity only. 

Aaron Hockley / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho gets almost half of its electricity from coal-fired plants in nearby states. But where the coal is burned doesn’t change things for Kelsey Nunez. She’s the executive director of the Snake River Alliance and says Idaho’s dependence on the carbon-emitting source needs to end.

Boise State University Special Collections and Archives

It was 65 years ago, deep in the Idaho wilderness, when one woman took poetry, turned it into music, and recorded it. Her collection of songs and poems lives on to this day, thanks in part to one dogged researcher and a librarian, both of whom wanted to share this special music with the world.

Myleen Hollero / San Francisco Bicycle Coalition

People in San Francisco have been talking about Idaho a lot these days. Specifically, the city of almost one million residents has been debating whether the "Idaho stop" should be adopted. That’s the shorthand given to the 1982 law that says people riding bikes can treat a stop sign like a yield sign, and a red light as a stop sign.

Idaho Fish and Game

Earlier this year, we brought you the story of beavers parachuting into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. The story spread like wildfire, complete with pictures of the beavers, tucked inside their travel boxes, parachuting into their new homes.

It turns out there’s more to this story.


This Thanksgiving,

help us capture an entire generation of American lives and experiences.