Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho's Rep. Labrador Votes Against Secure Rural Schools Funding

Idaho's two representatives split their votes on a bill that was overwhelmingly supported in the U.S. House Thursday that reauthorizes timber payments to rural counties with a lot of federal land. The Secure Rural Schools Act reauthorization was tucked inside a $214 billion bill that blocks cuts in doctors' Medicare payments. Just 37 House members voted against the bill, while 392 supported it. Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, was one of the 'no' votes. "Congressman Labrador has long advocated a...
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Max Corbet / Boise State University

The Boise State men’s basketball team is headed back to the NCAA tournament. The Broncos will play Wednesday night in Dayton, Ohio against the host Dayton Flyers.

Bryant Olsen / Flickr Creative Commons

About 750 acres in northern Idaho that's habitat for grizzly bears and other wildlife has been preserved through a federal grant purchase.

The Spokesman-Review reports that a family last month sold the development rights to the land along the Kootenai River north of Bonners Ferry for $798,000.

The grant money through the federal Forest Legacy Program is intended to protect habitat for wildlife while also providing recreation for visitors and allowing logging to continue.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

The company that manages mental health services for Idaho Medicaid patients is resuming a series of mental health trainings around the state. Optum has been doing what it calls mental health first aid classes for about a year. After taking a few months off, the classes begin in Weiser this Thursday.

Idaho lawmakers are set to tackle some of the most contentious issues of the session at the capitol. Monday morning starts with a hearing on abortion.

An Idaho sheriff says new evidence makes him confident there is no ongoing threat to the community following the arrest of a 22-year-old man connected to a triple killing.

Ada County Sheriff Gary Raney gave few details Friday about the active investigation into the killing of an Arizona power company executive, his wife and their adult son but says a diamond engagement ring taken from the home where the killings occurred has been recovered.

Detectives for several days had been trying to connect the ring to Adam M. Dees of Nampa.

tanakawho / Flickr

Idaho lawmakers are requesting the federal government to ensure that all genetically modified food labels are voluntary.

The Senate passed the non-binding resolution by voice vote Friday.

Republican Sen. Jim Rice from Caldwell told lawmakers that a patchwork of state labeling laws would be too complex for manufacturers and could raise food prices.

Rice says the Food and Drug Administration should make the rules standard across the county.

The House has already passed the request 41-24 last week.

Zoo Boise

Two wallaby mothers are showing off their new babies at Zoo Boise. Baby wallabies, known as joeys, spend most of their early months inside their mother’s pouch.

Mothers Abbey and Kaiya are both Bennett’s wallabies, a species that comes from Australia and are related to kangaroos. Both Abbey and Kaiya were also born at the zoo, in 2010 and 2011.

The zoo doesn’t know the gender of the joeys yet. That will come with their first veterinary exams. Kaiya’s joey is five-months-old. Abbey’s is three-months-old.

Aaron Maizlish / Flickr

Eleven biologists who study the greater sage grouse tell top federal officials the government isn't preparing to do enough to protect the ground-dwelling birds.

Greater sage grouse inhabit 11 states, including Idaho, and face federal protection because their numbers have declined dramatically over the past century.

In a letter Thursday to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, the 11 scientists say the federal government is abandoning science-based conservation of the birds.

legislature.idaho.gov

This story was updated with content from the Associated Press at 11:45 A.M.

Idaho parents of epileptic children appear to be slowly swaying the Idaho Legislature to allow the use of cannabis oil to treat seizure disorders.

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