Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

All-Ages Music Nonprofit Launches At Boise's Treefort Music Fest

About a dozen teenagers are helping set up a stage in a burrito shop in downtown Boise. (The salsa bar is stage right.) Some are stringing decorations from the ceiling and walls, in preparation for the slew of bands they'll host during Treefort Music Fest. Gus Marsden is helping run this new venue as a leader of the festival's all-ages volunteer team. “We’re converting it into a venue for Treefort while Pollo Rey transitions out of the space," says the 16-year-old. "So after Treefort’s done...

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MjZ Photography / Flickr

One of the main corridors of the Treasure Valley, Chinden Boulevard, could be expanded to a six lane highway over the next 25 years according to long range plans from the Idaho Transportation Department.

The section of roadway between Meridian and Caldwell would first be upgraded from two to four lanes in the next 15 years. Once that’s done, work would begin to widen it to six lanes by 2040.

John McCrostie for District 16 / Facebook

An Idaho Democratic lawmaker sparked objections from Republican members Monday for using an anti-motorcycling profiling bill to promote amending the state's Human's Rights Act.

Rep. John McCrostie of Boise praised the proposal for not allowing discrimination based on a certain lifestyle, adding that no one should be profiled if they are gay or a biker. McCrostie's argument caused vocal protest from lawmakers who felt he violated House floor rules.

This caused House Speaker Scott Bedke to warn Democrats to keep their debate focused on the proposed legislation.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise School District says it needs renovations to its schools and is asking voters to approve a $172 million bond to pay for it all. In Meridian, voters will consider a new bond for the West Ada School District worth $160 million over 10 years. And the Kuna school district has both a bond and supplemental levy on the ballot for the March 14 election.

Amalgamated Sugar

Employees at a sugar factory in Nampa may have had their personal information stolen by hackers.

Amalgamated Sugar bills itself as the second largest manufacturer of sugar from sugarbeets in the U.S. The factory is a familiar landmark off Interstate 84 in Nampa.

Last Thursday, the company found out it had been hacked. The hacker pretended to be Amalgamated’s CEO and mimicked his company email address. The hacker sent a phishing email to an employee asking for copies of personal information of workers.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State Public Radio and Idaho Education News are partnering to produce a week-long series on how the March 14 statewide school elections affect students, communities and taxpayers.

Twitter: @SenatorRisch

Senator Jim Risch proposed a novel idea for protecting the nation's power grid from cyber threats. The senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee thinks we should rely less on electronics and more on humans to manage the nation's electricity.

The Republican senator cited a 2015 cyber attack on Ukraine's power grid as evidence for his proposal. Power was cut to some 215,000 Ukranians in the incident, but the outage would've been even more widespread had humans not still been in physical control of some elements of the grid.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The U.S. Attorney in Boise, Wendy Olson, is leaving her post Saturday after seven years in the top position and two decades with the office. Just two days before stepping down, Matt Guilhem spoke to Olson, an Idaho native, not just about her long career, but about her roots in the Gem State.

Wendy Olson's last day on the job is February 25. She'll be going into private practice at a Boise law firm.

 

Tom Britt / Flickr Creative Commons

Zebra mussels are knocking at Idaho’s door.

Montana, Utah and Nevada all have the invasive species, which attach to boats and can spread easily from different bodies of water. They can kill native lake species and cost millions of dollars in damage and mitigation. They first appeared in the Great Lakes after Eastern European boats introduced them in the 1980s.

 

AP

As we wrap up week seven of the 2017 Idaho Legislature, lawmakers have passed 37 bills into new laws. That number will increase dramatically in the next four weeks.

One hot button issue this week was a bill that could have had some effect on the types of gaming that Native American tribes in Idaho could offer in their casinos.

In our 2017 Weekly Legislative Update, Boise State University professor Gary Moncrief says the House State Affairs Committee spent a lot of time on this bill. He say that was a little unusual for lawmakers.

In a story Feb. 23 about a lawsuit involving a wolf- and coyote-shooting contest in Idaho, The Associated Press reported erroneously the disposition of the suit. The judge dismissed part of the lawsuit, not the entire lawsuit, and a decision on an action the groups have against the U.S. Forest Service involving Idaho for Wildlife's predator contest is pending.

A corrected version of the story is below:

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