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Office of Idaho Senator Mike Crapo

The Trump administration on Monday named 10 judges and other law professionals it plans to nominate for key posts as President Donald Trump works to place more conservatives on the nation's federal courts.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said that among the candidates are individuals previously named on Trump's list of 21 possible picks for Supreme Court justice. All nominees would require Senate confirmation.

The announcement came less than a month after Trump's pick for the Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, was confirmed, restoring the court's conservative tilt.

Boise Philharmonic Has A New Music Director

May 9, 2017

A year ago, the Boise Philharmonic began an intensive search for a new Music Director. They’ve now finalized their decision.

It was like a yearlong episode of “Survivor.” Seven conductors came to Boise, not just to interview for the open position of Music Director, but also to lead the Boise Philharmonic.

It was an unusual process for the candidates. All seven finalists played with the musicians and also met donors and audience members. In the end, only one was left standing.

Boise State Public Radio's newsroom, KBSX, took home 17 Idaho Press Club awards on Saturday, including eight first-place prizes.

KBSX content was entered in radio, online and print categories.

Here is a full list of winners.

General Excellence – Radio

  1. Matt Guilhem – KBSX
  2. Samantha Wright – KBSX

Spot News Report – Radio

Dave Thomas / Flickr

The warm temperatures late last week are being blamed for rising flood waters in parts of Blaine and Elmore Counties.

Troy Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

President Donald Trump signed an executive order that questions the validity of some national monuments in the West.  The order applies to any national monument created after 1995 that totals at least 100,000 acres.

Friday, the Interior Department released the list of monuments up for review and announced the first-ever public comment period on the topic. In a new twist, Idaho's Craters of the Moon National Monument made the list.

Otto Kitsinger / AP

U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador says his answer to a question on health care at a recent town hall in northern Idaho wasn't very elegant.

Labrador has received criticism for his comment Friday that no one has died because they didn't have access to health care — a claim disputed by medical experts because they counter that patients without health coverage often risk waiting until their conditions have advanced too far for effective treatment.

Evan Vucci / AP

President Donald Trump urged Senate Republicans on Sunday to "not let the American people down," as the contentious debate over overhauling the U.S. health care systems shifts to Congress' upper chamber, where a vote is potentially weeks, if not months, away.

Some senators have already voiced displeasure with the health care bill that cleared the House last week, with Republicans providing all the "yes" votes in the 217-213 count. They cited concerns about potential higher costs for older people and those with pre-existing conditions, along with cuts to Medicaid.

John Bazemore / AP

The Georgia school district said it was investigating the baseball players for "misbehavior" and "inappropriate physical contact." What it didn't reveal was that a younger teammate had reported being sexually assaulted.

Even after players were later disciplined for sexual battery, the district cited student confidentiality to withhold details from the public and used "hazing" to describe the incident, which it also failed to report to the state as required.

George Prentice / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State graduates its class of 2017 on Saturday, May 6, marking the university’s 100th commencement. And for the first time, the ceremony will take place on the famous blue turf of Albertson’s Stadium.

Boise State Public Radio has revived its internship program for Boise State students. We've had interns gain newsroom experience "unofficially" in recent years, but it's been a while since students were given course credit for their time at the station.

At the start of January 2017, Lantz McGinnis-Brown and Elizabeth Findley kicked off this new wave of internships by joining the news team for the semester. Over the course of five months they learned the daily processes and inner workings of a media organization, and eventually produced radio spots all on their own.

Zoo Boise

Zoo Boise marks a milestone Friday. It was twenty years ago that Steve Burns joined up with the zoo.

Back then, Steve Burns was working at the Nature Conservancy in Washington D.C. He shifted gears and took the job as the Executive Director of the Friends of Zoo Boise. After three-and-a-half years, he added head of Zoo Boise to his title and now holds both jobs.

Monash University / Flickr Creative Commons

A proposed for-profit osteopathic medical school in Idaho can begin construction after receiving the necessary approval from a national accreditation agency.

Officials announced Thursday that the proposed Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine had received its pre-accreditation status. This allows the school plans to break ground May 17 and open its doors to students in fall 2018.

Earlier this year, school officials had said that if that if work did not get underway by the end of April, the opening would be pushed to 2019.

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Organizers of Idaho Gives say the day-long event to raise money for Idaho nonprofits was a success. With donations topping $1.3 million, organizers beat their goal.

Kim Nilsson / Flickr

Ahead of August’s total solar eclipse which will pass through Idaho, the state’s Department of Commerce is launching a website to help eclipse watchers coming to the Gem State.

Anywhere from 500,000 to a million people are expected to descend on Idaho this August to watch the once-in-a-lifetime spectacle of day turning to night as the moon blots out the sun.

NIFC

The National Interagency Fire Center issued its Fire Potential Outlook this week. With the harsh winter depositing plenty of snow in the mountains, the risk of fire for the next few months in the upper elevations should be reduced.

Across Idaho, NIFC is predicting a slow start to the fire season – especially in the mountains, according to Bryan Henry. The manager at NIFC’s Predictive Serives says reserves of mountain snow from the winter are melting slowly.

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