Adam Cotterell

News Reporter

Adam Cotterell returned to his home town of Boise, Idaho in 2007 after three years teaching university English in China. His plan was to teach high school, but in a move that almost makes him believe in destiny he took a part time job in Boise State Public Radio’s newsroom. He became a full time general assignments reporter in 2010. 

Adam lives in Boise with his wife, daughters, and dogs. He is also considered a pioneer in the art form abstract expressionist origami.

Micron Headquarters Building
Dan Greenwood / Boise State Public Radio

We learned last week that Harvard University is suing Micron Technology over patent infringement. Micron isn’t commenting on the suit. If it goes to court, the company will likely argue that the technology it uses is based on a patent it owns, not the one developed by Harvard.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Proponents of laws that bar transgender people from using public bathrooms and dressing rooms that conform to their gender identity are already seizing on an incident in eastern Idaho this week. A transgender woman is accused of taking pictures of a woman changing clothes in a Target dressing room in Ammon.

Boise transgender activist Emilie Jackson-Edney says it’s wrong to judge all transgender people by one person’s actions. But she says that will probably happen anyway in this case.

screengrab cumoco.com

A federal judge has stopped exploratory drilling in the Boise National Forest near Idaho City that could lead to a large open pit mine. Judge Edward Lodge says the Forest Service did not consider all the environmental impacts before granting a Canadian company permission to drill. Lodge made a similar decision in 2012.

Boise Fire Department / Twitter

Wildlife habitat managers say it’s essential that the area burned by the Table Rock fire in the Boise foothills be restored to prevent invasive species from taking over. The City of Boise already has $100,000 from the Zoo Boise conservation fund for habitat rehabilitation in the burn scar. But the city has very little expertise rehabbing land.

Boise Police Department City Hall Logo
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Boise Police Chief William Bones says there was a palpable sense of heartache at BPD headquarters Friday morning after the shooting Thursday night in Dallas that killed five police officers. We spoke with Bones Friday after he completed a previously-scheduled bike patrol.

Bones says the Dallas shooting has made him more grateful for the relatively positive relationship his officers have with their community.

screengrab YouTube.com

Update 7/11/16: The filmaker who captured the wild abandon of the Crouch Fourth of July celebration is not pleased with the version posted by the New York Post. Adam Nawrot calls the Post's shorter, music-enhanced video "disgusting."

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Think of it as calling dibs.

Idaho Lt. Gov. Brad Little announced last week he's running for governor almost two-and-a-half years before the 2018 election. With incumbent Butch Otter likely not running again, the field for the GOP nomination might be crowded.

Long-time Idaho political analyst Jim Weatherby says by becoming the first candidate in the race, Little may be sending a message to Republicans who respect the party hierarchy that he is the heir-apparent.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Table Rock Fire started late Wednesday night and continued into Thursday. By mid-morning officials said it had burned 2,500 acres but was mostly contained. The fire destroyed two structures including a home. Investigators say it was caused by fireworks. 

The Idaho Transportation Department Wednesday released a video showing progress on the Broadway Bridge replacement. It was taken by an aerial drone just a few days ago.

Neil R. / Flickr

In the last few days the U.S. Supreme Court has issued several major decisions. Perhaps the one that will have a direct impact on the most people in Idaho is last week’s split decision that effectively eliminates President Obama’s executive actions on immigration. Those would have granted temporary legal status to people whose children are legal U.S. residents (known as Deferred Action for Parents of Americans or DAPA) and to people who came to the country as children (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA.)

Screengrab USDA.gov

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, four Idaho counties are in a state of disaster because of drought. The counties are Canyon, Owyhee, Payette and Washington. Farmers and ranchers there and in any adjacent counties can get federal money to help them through the year if they can prove the drought is hurting their production.

For Sale Coldwell Banker House Sold
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Home ownership in Idaho’s two most populous counties is getting less affordable. That’s according to a report released Thursday by real estate data company RealtyTrac.

How affordable your home is has to do with the percentage of your income you have to spend on it. RealtyTrac says home prices are going up faster than income in Ada and Canyon Counties. So homes are getting less affordable.

screengrab aecf.org

The Annie E. Casey Foundation this week released its annual Kids Count report on child well-being. Idaho ranked 22nd out of the 50 states. But Idaho is not really in the middle of the pack when you break that ranking down into its individual components. In some measures, the state’s children have it much better than their peers in other states, and in some they have it much worse.

tribalclimatecamp.org

Representatives from Native American tribes are in McCall this week to talk about how they can adapt to climate change. Donald Sampson says Native Americans are and will continue to be more impacted by climate change than the rest of the country. That’s because climate changes are affecting their traditional food sources.

Kyle Green, Idaho Statesman

Organizers say after a gunman killed 49 people at a gay bar in Orlando last week, Boise's annual LGBT celebration known as Pridefest could go a couple of different ways. Fewer people might show up this weekend for Pridefest because of fear of anti-gay violence. Or, more people might turn out to show solidarity with the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Idaho Democrats kick off their 2016 state party convention Thursday. It runs through Saturday. Party leaders expect nearly 400 delegates at the Riverside Hotel in Garden City.

The itinerary includes training sessions for candidates and activists and updating the party platform. Idaho Democratic Party spokesman Dean Ferguson says there are a lot of platform changes being proposed but most are tweaks to language in existing planks. Ferguson says one significant change that may be made is calling for a specific increase to the state’s minimum wage.

U.S. Dept. of Education / Flickr Creative Commons

This year’s SAT results are out and Idaho high school juniors averaged 1002. If you’re bringing up what you know about SAT scores, maybe trying to remember your own, you may be thinking that’s pretty bad. And last year, when the total possible was 2,400, it would have been. But this is the first year of some big changes to the test and the scoring system. Now, the total possible score is 1,600.

Blue Cross of Idaho Ad
Sawyer Miller for Blue Cross of Idaho

If you buy your own health insurance rather than getting it from an employer, you’ll probably pay more for it next year, maybe a lot more. Health insurance carriers have told the Idaho Department of Insurance what changes they want to make to plans next year and the department has posted those proposed changes on its website. Six insurers want to make substantial rate increases that average 27 percent.

Mike Mozart, Flickr Creative Commons

For the past six months in a row Idaho has led the nation in job growth. That’s according to the Idaho Department of Labor, which cites data from Bureau of Labor Statistics.  The department predicts that job growth for all of 2016 will be between 3 and 3.5 percent.

courtesy Kristen Tracy

Author Kristen Tracy is coming to Idaho to promote her newest book, Project Unpopular. She’ll be doing a presentation at Boise’s Rediscovered Books June 16 at 7:00 pm. Talking about the book in the state is appropriate since, like many of the California-based writer's works, it is set in Idaho.  

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