Adam Cotterell

Podcaster

Adam Cotterell is a Boise State Public Radio podcaster, following a nine-year stint as a reporter.

Adam returned to his home town of Boise, Idaho in 2007 after three years teaching university English in China. His plan was to teach high school, but in a move that almost makes him believe in destiny he took a part time job in Boise State Public Radio’s newsroom. He became a full time general assignments reporter in 2010. 

Adam lives in Boise with his wife, daughters, and dogs. He is also considered a pioneer in the art form abstract expressionist origami.

Courtesy Boise State University

Imagine you’re facing the U.S. court system. You’ll spend the next several years steeped in a case that will decide your fate or the fate of someone you love. Now imagine you have no lawyer, no one to help you navigate the arcane twists and turns of this alien world. Now imagine you have to do this all in a language you don’t speak.

AP

In 2014 there was intense news coverage about tens of thousands of unaccompanied children and teens showing up on the U.S. border seeking asylum. Many of them are still in the country and a few are in Idaho. In our final episode of Some of the Parts, we hear the stories of two of those formally unaccompanied minors and learn how they got to Idaho.

Adelisa Juhic

At a time in our country when anti-Muslim sentiment is running high, we talk to women in Boise about what it’s like to wear a hijab, a traditional head scarf. In this episode of Some of the Parts, you'll hear stories of walking the streets (and grocery store aisles) of Boise while openly, obviously, visibly Muslim.

LGBT people experience homelessness in disproportionately high numbers and Boise is no exception. In episode six of Some of the Parts, we hear from a lesbian and a transgender woman about what it's like living on the streets of Boise, Idaho.

A lot of born-and-raised Idahoans put a mental box around anyone who moves in from out of state. In our fifth episode, we look at that native/newcomer divide through the perspective of someone from the part of the country with the fewest people who move to Idaho.

Love and dating and finding a mate can be difficult no matter where you are. But they may be even harder if you live on a farm in Idaho. In episode four, we chat up a couple of farmers who tell their stories of dating and love and the struggle to find that 'connection' while working on a farm.

AP

Who are the Basques? In episode three of Some of the Parts, we look at why you’ll hear a different answer to that question in Idaho than you’ll hear anywhere else in the world.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The alley known as Cooper Court wraps around Interfaith Sanctuary homeless shelter near downtown Boise. For much of 2015 the alley was packed to bursting with tents, makeshift shelters and the people living in them who preferred the streets to staying in shelters. That camp was one of the biggest local news stories of 2015. Police eventually cleared it, scattering its residents.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The tent camp in an alley called Cooper Court put homelessness at the forefront of Boise’s collective conscience like nothing else had in recent memory. In episode two of Some of the Parts, we check in with some of its residents one year after Boise Police cleared the alley.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State Public Radio’s new podcast Some of the Parts just launched. It tells the stories of small groups of people in Idaho. It’s hosted by KBSX’s reporter-turned-podcaster Adam Cotterell. He told Morning Edition host Matt Guilhem that the project was born from a desire to do what Cotterell likes to call, “founding principles reporting.”

In this debut episode, what happens when you’re part of two communities that don’t get along? Hear one person’s story of trying to be part of two groups and not feeling at home anywhere. Denying either might mean truly belonging in the other but can you choose to deny part of who you are?  

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

EDITOR'S NOTE:  Boise State Public Radio is bidding farewell to a familiar voice. ​Adam Cotterell has been a reporter on our airwaves for nine years. But starting next week, he will become a stay-at-home dad instead. (He's not leaving the radio station entirely. He'll work as a part-time podcaster on a special project set to debut in February.) For his last daily reporting assignment, we asked Adam to tell us about stay-at-home fatherhood in Idaho. 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

It’s a hot August afternoon and Maria sits in a car in a Kuna parking lot. The air is on a little but the engine’s not running so it doesn’t do much good. Despite the heat Maria wears a pink sweatshirt and a matching baseball cap. Maybe this heat doesn’t seem so bad to her because she just finished several hours working in a corn field.

“Today we were dis-tasseling the corn, taking all the tassels off,” she says. “They say it helps it grow faster.”

courtesy Caldwell Fine Arts

Eleven Tibetan Monks will be spending this week in Caldwell at the invitation of the College of Idaho and the nonprofit Caldwell Fine Arts. These monks are from a monastery in India that has a satellite campus of sorts in Georgia. The monastery’s founders fled Tibet after the Chinese government took over the area in the 1950s and its monks follow the Dalai Lama.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

There’s a legal fight going on over control of water in the Treasure Valley. The rhetoric in the fight has been intense. One side even has an ad campaign. 

Imagine a movie-theater preview voice comes up over cheery music reminiscent of a babbling brook. 

“Irrigation water, it makes the Treasure Valley a lush green miracle instead of a desert landscape. Imagine a typical 105 degree summer day. Now imagine your irrigation water is completely shut off to your lawn, garden, farm or favorite park.” The music stops.

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