Adam Cotterell

Podcaster

Adam Cotterell is a Boise State Public Radio podcaster, following a nine-year stint as a reporter.

Adam returned to his home town of Boise, Idaho in 2007 after three years teaching university English in China. His plan was to teach high school, but in a move that almost makes him believe in destiny he took a part time job in Boise State Public Radio’s newsroom. He became a full time general assignments reporter in 2010. 

Adam lives in Boise with his wife, daughters, and dogs. He is also considered a pioneer in the art form abstract expressionist origami.

AP

Who are the Basques? In episode three of Some of the Parts, we look at why you’ll hear a different answer to that question in Idaho than you’ll hear anywhere else in the world.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The alley known as Cooper Court wraps around Interfaith Sanctuary homeless shelter near downtown Boise. For much of 2015 the alley was packed to bursting with tents, makeshift shelters and the people living in them who preferred the streets to staying in shelters. That camp was one of the biggest local news stories of 2015. Police eventually cleared it, scattering its residents.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The tent camp in an alley called Cooper Court put homelessness at the forefront of Boise’s collective conscience like nothing else had in recent memory. In episode two of Some of the Parts, we check in with some of its residents one year after Boise Police cleared the alley.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State Public Radio’s new podcast Some of the Parts just launched. It tells the stories of small groups of people in Idaho. It’s hosted by KBSX’s reporter-turned-podcaster Adam Cotterell. He told Morning Edition host Matt Guilhem that the project was born from a desire to do what Cotterell likes to call, “founding principles reporting.”

In this debut episode, what happens when you’re part of two communities that don’t get along? Hear one person’s story of trying to be part of two groups and not feeling at home anywhere. Denying either might mean truly belonging in the other but can you choose to deny part of who you are?  

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

EDITOR'S NOTE:  Boise State Public Radio is bidding farewell to a familiar voice. ​Adam Cotterell has been a reporter on our airwaves for nine years. But starting next week, he will become a stay-at-home dad instead. (He's not leaving the radio station entirely. He'll work as a part-time podcaster on a special project set to debut in February.) For his last daily reporting assignment, we asked Adam to tell us about stay-at-home fatherhood in Idaho. 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

It’s a hot August afternoon and Maria sits in a car in a Kuna parking lot. The air is on a little but the engine’s not running so it doesn’t do much good. Despite the heat Maria wears a pink sweatshirt and a matching baseball cap. Maybe this heat doesn’t seem so bad to her because she just finished several hours working in a corn field.

“Today we were dis-tasseling the corn, taking all the tassels off,” she says. “They say it helps it grow faster.”

courtesy Caldwell Fine Arts

Eleven Tibetan Monks will be spending this week in Caldwell at the invitation of the College of Idaho and the nonprofit Caldwell Fine Arts. These monks are from a monastery in India that has a satellite campus of sorts in Georgia. The monastery’s founders fled Tibet after the Chinese government took over the area in the 1950s and its monks follow the Dalai Lama.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

There’s a legal fight going on over control of water in the Treasure Valley. The rhetoric in the fight has been intense. One side even has an ad campaign. 

Imagine a movie-theater preview voice comes up over cheery music reminiscent of a babbling brook. 

“Irrigation water, it makes the Treasure Valley a lush green miracle instead of a desert landscape. Imagine a typical 105 degree summer day. Now imagine your irrigation water is completely shut off to your lawn, garden, farm or favorite park.” The music stops.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

When I turn on a sink I often wonder where the water is coming from. It turns out when I’m getting a drink in our newsroom kitchenette in east Boise I can see the answer through the window. It’s the Boise River. If I could go up the faucet and through the pipes I’d come out less than a mile upstream at the Marden water treatment plant off of Warm Springs Blvd.

Mark Snider with Suez, the multi-national company that supplies drinking water to most of Boise and some of Eagle says this was their first surface water treatment plant in Boise.

Decaseconds / Flickr Creative Commons

In 1974 world-famous daredevil Evel Knievel attempted to jump the Snake River Canyon in a steam-powered rocket. He ended up falling into the canyon on a parachute. To this day, that’s probably what Twin Falls is most known for outside of Idaho.

Jon Rawlinson / Flickr Creative Commons

A national education policy advocacy organization is holding its 3rd annual conference in Boise this week. The agenda is mostly what you’d expect, a lot of speeches, which started Wednesday night and run through Friday. But the conference also features a reality TV twist.

Brad Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

Ross Winton has been spending a lot of time lately catching butterflies in south-central Idaho and putting tiny stickers on their wings. That’s so they can be identified by scientists who see them in other places. But Winton, a biologist with Idaho’s Department of Fish and Game, thinks now the last of them may have moved out of state for the season. Winton is part of a regional monarch butterfly study. He says scientists know in great detail where a monarch born in upstate New York or Michigan or Northern California will travel in its life.   

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

KBSX reporter Frankie Barnhill visited base camp at the Pioneer Fire on Aug. 27 to profile Type 1 Incident Commander Beth Lund. Adam Cotterell asks her about the experience, including what's up with the women's only porta potties, what to eat at fire camp, and how to earn "trail cred" in wildland firefighting.

Courtesy Twin Falls County Fair Board

So, Jesse Owens came to Twin Falls for a race in 1938 … against a horse. Yes, the Jesse Owens you learned about in history class who humiliated Hitler by dominating the 1936 Berlin Olympics. According to the Twin Falls Times-News Hidden History column, Owens was at the Southern Idaho Fair (now the Twin Falls County Fair) for a simple reason: money.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Managers of the Boise National Forest say one small section of their jurisdiction is in crisis. But that small section is the Bogus Basin Resort, which means addressing this crisis is urgent and difficult.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) is encouraging all its members to make a plan to protect pollinating insects and most states are doing that or have already adopted one. Dudley Hoskins with NASDA says the plans are needed because bees face a variety of threats.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The city of Twin Falls and Clif Bar Tuesday celebrate the opening of a new plant that will bake all flavors of the company’s signature energy bars and a line of kid’s bars. The plant is nearly 300,000 square feet and employs more than 200 people with about 60 more to be added early next year. The lowest wage is $15 an hour.

Idaho Fish & Game Headquarters Office Sign Director
Dan Greenwood / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s Department of Fish and Game says people can still buy hunting tags and fishing licenses at participating stores and Fish and Game offices, but not online. That’s after the software company that manages online and in-person sales told Fish and Game it had been hacked.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The City of Boise is holding a celebration today for the opening of a new public works facility. But the facility isn’t in Boise. In fact, it’s a county away. And it’s meant to do something cities don’t normally do: Clean water polluted by agriculture. It’s called the Dixie Drain project and KBSX's Adam Cotterell has reported on it in the past. Adam told Scott Graf what the Dixie Drain project is.

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