Adam Cotterell

News Reporter

Adam Cotterell returned to his home town of Boise, Idaho in 2007 after three years teaching university English in China. His plan was to teach high school, but in a move that almost makes him believe in destiny he took a part time job in Boise State Public Radio’s newsroom. He became a full time general assignments reporter in 2010. 

Adam lives in Boise with his wife, daughters, and dogs. He is also considered a pioneer in the art form abstract expressionist origami.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio/ StateImpact Idaho

Polls are open from 8:00 am until 8:00 Tuesday night for Idaho’s Republican presidential primary. To cast a ballot, voters have to affiliate with the GOP, and registration is allowed at polling stations. There are 13 candidates on the Republican ballot. That could complicate who gets Idaho’s 32 delegates.

Courtesy Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Since we learned recently that a for-profit medical school will be built in Meridian, we’ve also heard criticism that it won't help solve Idaho’s doctor shortage. Much of that criticism is about the lack of residency positions in Idaho. Critics argue doctors don’t practice where they go to medical school, but where they do their residency. Idaho only has 41 spots for residents and competition is already stiff.

Coleen Danger / Flickr Creative Commons

Volunteers with the group New Approach Idaho have spent several months gathering signatures to put medical marijuana legalization on the ballot in November. Now, with less than two months until the deadline, the group’s president has canceled the petition.

Bill Esbensen says he received a letter from a national pediatric organization that had been listed on the petition as supporters of medical marijuana. The group asked that its name be removed. Esbensen says New Approach leadership had been considering pulling the petition anyway because it wasn’t written well enough.

Richard Eriksson / Flickr Creative Commons

A recent recommendation to the Boise City Council has awoken an issue that was, a few years ago, among the most hotly debated topics in Idaho’s capital city – should downtown Boise get a streetcar? But Mike Journee, a spokesman for Mayor Dave Bieter, says a committee led by a city engineer has not yet recommended that Boise actually build a streetcar line.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The President Pro Tem of Idaho’s Senate, Brent Hill (R-Rexburg) Tuesday said his greatest disappointment for the current legislative session is that lawmakers have not brought forth a bill to prevent discrimination against the LGBT community that also ensures religious freedom. A week ago Hill told KBSX that negotiations had been going on behind the scenes and that there was still time in the session to present a bill.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

We learned last week that the state of Idaho has struck a deal with a group of investors who want to build a for-profit, osteopathic medical school on Idaho State University’s Meridian campus. When he made the announcement, Idaho Governor Butch Otter said the school would go a long way in solving Idaho’s doctor shortage.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

We learned last week that Idaho could get its first medical school two years from now. But the announcement that it would be a school of osteopathic medicine left a lot of people wondering just what that is. Everybody knows what an M.D. is. But you may not know that an M.D. has a degree in allopathic medicine. Someone with a degree in osteopathic medicine is a D.O.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A national suicide prevention organization and several Idaho groups with the same mission plan to spend Thursday trying to convince Idaho lawmakers to implement four recommendations. Those recommendations are the top priorities from a twelve-point suicide prevention plan created last year by the Idaho Health Quality Planning Commission.

The HQPC is a group of healthcare professionals, insurance industry reps and academics that advises Idaho lawmakers on ways to improve healthcare. It has identified suicide as one of the biggest public health threats facing Idaho. 

dontfailidaho.org/screengrab

The Boise School Board and the district’s superintendent have come out with some sharp criticism of the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Family Foundation. The rebuke comes in the form of an op-ed related to how the foundation portrays Idaho schools. 

At the center of the controversy is a TV commercial from the Albertson Foundation’s “Don’t Fail Idaho” campaign. In it, a school bus with five teenagers stops in the middle of nowhere. Four get off and the bus drives away. Then a voice says...

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

We’re more than a month and a half into the 2016 session of Idaho’s legislature. By this point in last year’s session, dozens of protesters had been arrested. They wanted lawmakers to pass a bill making it illegal to discriminate against people based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The year before saw similar protests but this year they’ve been largely absent.

Nicole LaFavour, one of the leaders of the Add the Words movement says it’s because a group of senators has been meeting to craft a bill that could get bipartisan support.

Boise State University School of Public Service

In a public opinion poll from Boise State University that we’ve been reporting on this week, respondents overwhelmingly named education as the most important issue in Idaho. But, that desire to focus on education comes with a pretty low opinion of the state’s school system.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Friday and Saturday Ballet Idaho does its winter show at Boise’s Morrison Center for the Performing Arts. And tickets sold much faster than usual. This ballet is made up of four short pieces but one of them in particular is generating the excitement.

At a recent rehearsal John Selya goes over trouble spots with Ballet Idaho dancers, an activity he calls slaying dragons.

Boise State University School of Public Service

Only a few of the 1,000 Idahoans who took a new public opinion poll saw immigration as a big priority for the state.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Last year Idaho governor Butch Otter vetoed a bill that would have made it legal for children with severe epilepsy to use a treatment that comes from marijuana.

McClure Center / Data U.S. Census

Idaho is becoming more diverse because of its increasing Hispanic population. The state has a smaller proportion of Hispanics than the nation as a whole, but that gap is closing.  Most Hispanics in Idaho were born in the U.S. Those are some of the findings of a recent report from the University of Idaho’s McClure Center for Public Policy.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The City of Boise and a handful of nonprofit and public sector partners Tuesday announced a new program to house the area’s chronically homeless population. The plan would first put 15 homeless people in existing apartments for a cost of about $300,000 a year. Those would be owned by the city, the county housing authority and private landlords. KBSX previewed this plan in October

Bogus Basin, ski
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

As part of a new pricing structure for Bogus Basin Ski Resort, managers recently announced new partnerships with Tamarack and Soldier Mountain. Starting next winter Bogus season pass owners will get some time at Tamarack and vice versa.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

On any given day, several hundred prisoners of the state of Idaho are housed in county jails. For the last half year it averages to more than 630, and the state paid the counties about $1 million a month to keep them. They’re there for short stays, like if someone violates parole or has just been sentenced and it might take some time to get his or her spot ready at the state prison. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Months’ of coverage of Boise’s high-profile homeless camp included the voices of homeless people, their advocates and members of a city government that ultimately removed the camp from the public eye.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Olinka Vistica and Drazen Grubisic came up with the idea that became the Museum of Broken Relationships (MoBR) while they were breaking up more than a decade ago. Because of it they now spend more time together than they did when they were a couple. It started as an exhibit at an art show in their native Croatia. They solicited mementos of failed relationships and asked people to write descriptions of the object and the relationship. The two say it was hugely popular from the very beginning.

Pages