Adam Cotterell

News Reporter

Adam Cotterell returned to his home town of Boise, Idaho in 2007 after three years teaching university English in China. His plan was to teach high school, but in a move that almost makes him believe in destiny he took a part time job in Boise State Public Radio’s newsroom. He became a full time general assignments reporter in 2010. 

Adam lives in Boise with his wife, daughters, and dogs. He is also considered a pioneer in the art form abstract expressionist origami.

McClure Center / Data U.S. Census

Idaho is becoming more diverse because of its increasing Hispanic population. The state has a smaller proportion of Hispanics than the nation as a whole, but that gap is closing.  Most Hispanics in Idaho were born in the U.S. Those are some of the findings of a recent report from the University of Idaho’s McClure Center for Public Policy.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The City of Boise and a handful of nonprofit and public sector partners Tuesday announced a new program to house the area’s chronically homeless population. The plan would first put 15 homeless people in existing apartments for a cost of about $300,000 a year. Those would be owned by the city, the county housing authority and private landlords. KBSX previewed this plan in October

Bogus Basin, ski
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

As part of a new pricing structure for Bogus Basin Ski Resort, managers recently announced new partnerships with Tamarack and Soldier Mountain. Starting next winter Bogus season pass owners will get some time at Tamarack and vice versa.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

On any given day, several hundred prisoners of the state of Idaho are housed in county jails. For the last half year it averages to more than 630, and the state paid the counties about $1 million a month to keep them. They’re there for short stays, like if someone violates parole or has just been sentenced and it might take some time to get his or her spot ready at the state prison. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Months’ of coverage of Boise’s high-profile homeless camp included the voices of homeless people, their advocates and members of a city government that ultimately removed the camp from the public eye.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Olinka Vistica and Drazen Grubisic came up with the idea that became the Museum of Broken Relationships (MoBR) while they were breaking up more than a decade ago. Because of it they now spend more time together than they did when they were a couple. It started as an exhibit at an art show in their native Croatia. They solicited mementos of failed relationships and asked people to write descriptions of the object and the relationship. The two say it was hugely popular from the very beginning.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A developer broke ground Wednesday on a new upscale apartment building in downtown Boise. If it feels like you’ve seen a lot of these lately, you’re not imagining things. Ada County is in the middle of an unprecedented apartment building boom.

Consider a spot in southwest Boise where workers are putting siding on one of several buildings in a new apartment complex called the Asheville. They’re bundled up because the temperature is hovering right at freezing. But it’s blessedly warm inside one of the units that’s already finished.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A marijuana policy forum Tuesday night that was billed as a balanced discussion between some of Idaho’s top supporters and opponents of pot legalization turned out not to be all it was advertised.

First, a former Idaho lawmaker who is a pro-pot Republican bowed out, organizers say for health reasons. To replace him, a marijuana advocate with a national following was added to the program. Then Tuesday a speaker from the Idaho State Police canceled. Finally Elisha Figueroa, chief drug policy advisor to Idaho’s governor, backed out.

medical marijuana, pot
Audio Vision, Public Radio / Flickr Creative Commons

What’s being billed as a town hall meeting on marijuana policy is scheduled for 7:00 p.m. Tuesday at the Boise State University Student Union Building. The forum will include some influential figures with differing perspectives on the pot legalization.

Speakers include a pro-marijuana blogger, a pro-marijuana radio personality, someone from the Idaho State Police and Elisha Figueroa - the head of the governor’s Office for Drug Policy.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr.com

Few people know the boundaries of the county they live in down to excruciatingly precise detail. But there are people who do know, for things like taxes and map making.  But it turns that out that for a long time nobody knew exactly where Idaho’s most populous county ended and where one of its neighbors began.

By the end of 2016 Ada County surveyor Jerry Hastings expects to be done with what has, so far, been a 12-year project.  He and his Boise County counterparts have been trying to re-establish their boundary.

The owners of the Village Cinemas in Meridian are suing the Idaho State Police because the agency wants to revoke the theater’s liquor license. The action stems from an instance last February when undercover officers say they were served alcohol at a showing of Fifty Shades of Grey, an R-rated movie about sexual fetishes. Idaho law prohibits alcohol at movies that include sexual content.

zippia.com

Idaho Googled “Bike Repair” more than any other state according to a map going around social media. It purports to show what job each state Googles more than any other. The map was created by career advice website Zippia.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise International Market had been operating less than a year when it burned down in September. Since the fire, people have been asking if the popular destination for food, imports and culture would be rebuilt. We still don’t know the answer to that, but we do know something similar is on the way.

Kathrine Jones / Idaho Staesman

A Spokane pastor was in Boise last week to warn Idaho lawmakers that refugees pose a security threat to the United States. That’s a position some Idaho lawmakers already hold and the issue may come up in the current legislative session.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Nearly 200 people at the Idaho Capitol Thursday night listened to speeches from an anti-Islamic preacher and a member of a right-wing, national security advocacy group. The topic was refugee resettlement.

Before the speeches, about 100 people lined the marble hallway to the Capitol’s largest public meeting room. They held signs reading things like “Idaho is too great for hate.” Kristin Ruether’s sign said, “refugees welcome” in English and Arabic.

tilproject.com

Idaho lawmakers Thursday evening are invited to a presentation by an anti-Islamic preacher and an anti-immigration advocate. The speakers will be in the Capitol’s largest public meeting room, the Lincoln Auditorium.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Tuesday was the second day of the 2016 session of the Idaho legislature but lawmakers did not spend the afternoon crafting policy. Instead they did a five-hour training on civil discourse. Legislative leaders participated in the training a few months ago and decided all lawmakers needed to hear it. It’s presented by the National Institute for Civil Discourse at the University of Arizona which works with Congress, state legislatures and the media to promote civility in political conversation.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

In 2015, nearly 730,000 foreign-born people took the oath to become U.S. citizens. That included 1,449 in Idaho. Thursday more joined them in Idaho’s first naturalization ceremony of the year.

Sometimes these ceremonies are done with a lot of pomp at public events like 4th of July celebrations. This one is in the waiting room of a federal office, the kind of place where most days people take a number and wait to talk to someone through a window.

M&R Glasgow / Flickr.com

With an executive order this week, President Obama is seeking to require background checks on most gun sales. Until now, the checks haven't been required for sales by small vendors. This is sometimes referred to as the “gun show loophole.”

idtrucking.org

In Congress’ recent omnibus spending bill there was a small, largely unnoticed provision that applied only to Idaho. But it had nothing to do with spending. The provision allows Idaho to raise weight limits for big trucks.  

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