Adam Cotterell

News Reporter

Adam Cotterell returned to his home town of Boise, Idaho in 2007 after three years teaching university English in China. His plan was to teach high school, but in a move that almost makes him believe in destiny he took a part time job in Boise State Public Radio’s newsroom. He became a full time general assignments reporter in 2010. 

Adam lives in Boise with his wife, daughters, and dogs. He is also considered a pioneer in the art form abstract expressionist origami.

CyberHades / Flickr Creative Commons

The state of Idaho’s new Cybersecurity Task Force holds its first meeting Wednesday afternoon. Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter created the group through executive order in July. Lieutenant Governor Brad Little will chair the task force.

Flickr Creative Commons

  Downtown Boise is going through a hotel boom. Six have been proposed in the last six months and five have the city’s go-ahead for construction. At the same time, Meridian is trying to recruit someone to build a hotel in its downtown. But that effort has been unsuccessful so far.

Meridian officials actually want three things built in their city's downtown – a performing arts center, a conference center and a hotel. The city recently requested proposals for those but got zero response.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

About 20 small business owners, many of them refugees, lost their livelihoods and their dreams when the Boise International Market burned down over the weekend. But the market’s owners Lori Porreca and Miguel Gaddi lost their business and their dream as well. The partners in life and business worked for years to make the market a reality only to lose it after less than a year of operation. They were out of town to get married when the fire happened.

Idaho Statesman

A study commissioned by Bogus Basin resort recommends big changes if the ski hill wants to stay in business. Recommendations include buying equipment to make snow and emphasizing opportunities for summer recreation. But one other suggestion may be problematic: raising prices.

An adult can ski all day at Bogus for $54 or buy a season ticket for $299. Ted Beeler says that’s too low.

“They definitely need to move the needle,” he says.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

In June of 2014, we first told you about a new place that was under construction in Boise where refugees and others would soon be able to own small businesses. Last April we introduced you to some of them as the Boise International Market celebrated its grand opening. But over the weekend the market burned.

Screen grab usbr.gov / Bureau of Reclamation

The three big reservoirs on the Boise River started summer with a good bit of water left over from the previous year. Altogether, they are a little under half full right now. That’s below normal, according to Brian Sauer with the Bureau of Reclamation in Boise.

“And we’re still in irrigation season so it will drop some more,” Sauer says.

Boise Education Association

The lawsuit announced Thursday against the Boise School District and the Boise Education Association is as much about opposing perspectives on unions as about the constitutional issues it broaches directly.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The conservative watchdog group Idaho Freedom Foundation announced a lawsuit Thursday against the Boise School District and its teachers union, the Boise Education Association. Freedom Foundation President Wayne Hoffman says part of the district’s master labor agreement with the union violates Idaho’s constitution.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

An old school bus, painted blue, pulls up alongside a wooden fence around a sprawling mobile home park in Garden City. It’s the Garden City library’s Bells For Books bus. All day in the summer and in afternoons during the school year, it goes to some of the Treasure Valley’s poorest neighborhoods. The idea is that even though this town, almost entirely surrounded by Boise, is only four miles long it has a lot of kids who can’t get to the library.

epa.ohio.gov

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) says Idaho’s biggest wildfire this year, the nearly 300,000 acre Soda Fire, generated potential hazardous material sites. One is an old mercury processing facility in the Owyhee County desert that was cleaned up four years ago.

Randy Craig / Idaho Fish and Game

Idaho’s largest fire this year burned 279,144 acres in the southwest corner of the state. That figure is from a list released over the weekend that details the Soda Fire’s impacts. The list has numbers on nearly 30 items, including 592 miles of fences burned and 68 golden eagle nests destroyed. It also says 16 cultural sites eligible for the National Register of Historic Places were burned.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Comic book conventions, known has "cons", happen in nearly every city in the country. Some are money-making affairs, others are organized by fans for fans. But in Boise, the public library has gotten in on this pop-culture phenomenon.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Southwest Idaho’s nearly 300,000 acre Soda Fire is the largest this year in areas managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Most of the burned area was habitat for the sage grouse, the bird whose status as a contender for the Endangered Species List could affect ranching, recreation and energy production in 11 western states. That is why the national director of the BLM was in Boise Wednesday to talk about rehabilitating that land.

Boise State Public Radio

A man was severely burned and his two dogs were killed last week in a hot spring in the Salmon-Challis National Forest. Normally, Panther Creek hot spring is very hot, but comfortable enough for outdoor soaking enthusiasts. But now, forest managers say the water has gotten much hotter (possibly at or near boiling) and they are urging users to be cautious.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

More than 70 firefighters from Australia and New Zealand arrived in Boise Sunday to help fight wildfires burning throughout the Northwest. They are currently at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise for training and will deploy later this week. Area fire managers requested their help last week, following a rash of large fires that have stretched American resources very thin.

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) issued an alert Monday declaring air quality unhealthy again in the Treasure Valley. The agency issued a similar alert last Thursday.  

If your shortness of breath is giving you déjà vu, you’re not alone. This summer's smoke and wildfires are approaching the numbers put up in the summers of 2007, 2012 and 2013.

I-5 Design and Manufacture / Flickr Creative Commons

I shop at Albertsons a few times a week. I live near one and there are two close to our radio studio. I’ll pop over in the evening or on weekends to pick up a few things. Granted, my market research is light-years from being scientific, but on those trips I’ve noticed a couple of things that have made me less than optimistic for the future of this hometown company. 

One, it’s never crowded compared to the store where I go for my big, once-a-week shopping trips. And two, like me, everyone there seems to be buying just a few things.  

Elevated / Flickr Creative Commons

The Ketchum City Council this week passed an ordinance authorizing police to break into cars to rescue pets endangered by high temperatures. It may be the only city ordinance of its kind in Idaho. That could be because most law enforcement agencies don’t think it’s necessary.

Meridian Deputy Police Chief Tracy Basterrechea says even though his city doesn't have a specific ordinance on it, his officers have the authority to break into a car to rescue an overheated animal.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Boise-based Albertsons filed this week to offer stock for public sale. Albertsons became one of the largest food retailers in the country early this year when it closed on its acquisition of Safeway. 

Ada County Weed, Pest and Mosquito Abatement

Later this week, Ada County will take to the skies to spray for mosquitoes.  The spraying will occur Thursday after 8 p.m. over east Boise, and in Eagle and Star.

Mosquitoes in Canyon and Gem Counties have tested positive for West Nile Virus, and Ada County mosquito abatement officials say it’s only a matter of time before the potentially deadly disease reaches the state’s most populous county.

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