Amanda Peacher

Reporter, Mountain West News Bureau

Amanda Peacher works for the Mountain West News Bureau out of Boise State Public Radio. She's an Idaho native who returned home after a decade of living and reporting in Oregon. She's an award-winning reporter with a background in community engagement and investigative journalism.

Amanda pedals her bike to work and spends weekends hiking the Boise foothills with her toddler and husband, baking unhealthy sweets, or feebly trying to get her garden to grow.

You can reach Amanda at amandapeacher@boisestate.edu.

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West News Bureau

Environmental Protection Agency leader Scott Pruitt made a quiet visit to Boise Tuesday, to sign a new agreement between his agency and the state of Idaho.

 

Courtesy U.S. Forest Service

President Trump has overturned a rule requiring outfitters to pay river and backcountry guides on public lands a minimum wage.

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West New Bureau

When you hear about companies like REI or Patagonia, you might think about tents, rain jackets or hikers in puffy coats on a mountaintop. But how about politics? These outdoorsy companies are part of a new wave of business advocates fighting for public lands.

sage grouse, wildlife
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Flickr Creative Commons

Currently the sage grouse is not listed under the Endangered Species Act. And a bill before Congress  would prevent that from happening anytime in the next decade.

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West News Bureau

Each summer, thousands of firefighters devote long hours to putting out wildfires. At the end of each day, they retreat to camp a safe distance away where they can relax and recharge to be ready for their next shift. And also get fed. For the Mountain West News Bureau’s Faces Behind the Fire series, we talk to the man in charge of the kitchen.

 

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West New Bureau

Last weekend, 30 some years of regulars raised a glass to Turner’s Sportsfair, an iconic dive bar and tackle shop on State Street in Boise. Bartender Tammy Wood has worked at Turner's for 35 years. With Boise and many cities across the Mountain West experiencing rapid growth, that means change for some historic neighborhoods and businesses.

Courtesy USDA Forest Service

President Trump just dismantled policies requiring federal agencies reduce their own greenhouse gas emissions and meet other environmental targets.

Amanda Peacher / Boise State Public Radio

Former State Representative Paulette Jordan has won the Democratic primary in Idaho’s gubernatorial race. If Jordan wins in November, she’d become the first woman governor of Idaho and the first Native American governor in the country.

Liralen Li / Flickr Creative Commons

People who have solar panels on their homes are different from typical Idaho Power customers. That’s according to a new ruling by Idaho’s Public Utilities Commission, which could cost more money for those embracing renewable energy in the future.

Howard Berkes / NPR

The Society for American Archeology canceled a panel this spring because the Bureau of Land Management wouldn’t pay for its staffers to attend and lead a symposium on Land Management issues.

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West News Bureau

If you’re looking for a new primary care doctor in states like Idaho or Wyoming, good luck. Our region has some of the worst doctor shortages of all U.S. states.

wild horses, nevada, wildlife
James Marvin Phelps / Flickr Creative Commons

The Bureau of Land Management has presented Congress with a controversial new plan to manage wild horses.

National Forest Service

Environmental groups want to stop sheep grazing on public lands in the region. The issue is playing out in the courts in Idaho and Montana.  

For Sale Coldwell Banker House Sold
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A new Bloomberg analysis looks at the widening gap between the rich and the poor in cities across the nation. 

MODIFIED FROM SEAGER ET AL. EARTH INTERACTIONS, 2018

The dry and arid climate of the Western U.S. is marching eastward, thanks to climate change.

That’s the conclusion of a set of studies from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Institute. 

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