Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

Rob DeGraff / Flickr Creative Commons

If you thought last January was rough, just imagine being a vineyard owner in the Snake River Valley.

Keith Ridler / AP Images

Obama’s Interior Department decided not to put the greater sage grouse on the Endangered Species List. In exchange, officials created a plan which restricted ranching, mining and other resource extraction – but not as drastically as a listing decision would have.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Images

After Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee announced Tuesday that he would not run for reelection in 2018, a powerful position in foreign affairs opened up.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

It’s been 15 years since Hasan Elahi was interrogated by the FBI as a suspected terrorist.


Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho state foresters are using a provision of the 2014 federal Farm Bill to increase logging in some forests. The collaborative approach comes at a time when the debate over public land management continues – often at a fever pitch.

Stethescope, Health Care, Doctor, Medical
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The latest attempt by Republican senators to repeal the Affordable Care Act is still looking for the 51 votes necessary to pass it this month. Known as the Graham-Cassidy bill, the policy would repeal Medicaid expansion for low-income folks and revoke the premium tax credits that are mainstays of Obamacare.


Meriwether Lewis Elementary School / Flickr Creative Commons

Compared to the rest of the country, Idaho kids are less likely to be obese. That’s according to new data analyzed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

In August, a poster surfaced online advertising that Hammerfest would go down on September 30th in Boise. The event is sponsored by the Hammerskins, a white supremacist group that started in Dallas in the late 1980s. The white power themed concerts have taken place around the country and even in Budapest.

John Robison / Idaho Conservation League

Justin Hayes says he would rather not experience this kind of déjà vu.

“Having a mining company upstream flaunting environmental laws and discharging arsenic into the Boise River is really not acceptable,” says the Idaho Conservation League Program Director.

Boise State University / via Twitter screengrab

Britta Closson adopted her dog Kohl about three years ago when the black lab was in pretty rough shape.

drought, field, agriculture
Molly Messick / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho may be known as the potato state – and there’s good reason for it. On a per capita basis, the state generates the most money from agriculture out of any western state.


Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

If you’re a city manager looking to renew your town’s sewer treatment plant permit, you’re going to have to wait a while to get a new one. The EPA administers permits for the state under the Clean Water Act.

Peter Lovera / Treefort Music Fest

You know the saying: The early bird gets the $50 five-day ticket to see hundreds of live bands, films, performance art and a lot more at Treefort Music Fest . . . or something like that.

City of Boise

Apparently, there was a lot of pent-up demand for composting.

Ringo H.W. Chiu / AP Images

For the first time in two years, active duty soldiers have been mobilized to fight wildfires in the West. Two hundred military personnel are heading to battle the Umpqua North Complex. The 47-square mile wildfire is burning in the southwest corner of Oregon.

 

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