Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

Federal officials are proposing approving Idaho's request to loosen field burning rules that backers say offer more flexibility to disperse smoke away from people but that health advocates say will lead to breathing problems for some area residents.

Rick Bowmer / AP Images

Last year, Idaho became the first state to track sexual assault investigation kits – making sure the kits are tested and processed according to state law. The Idaho State Police released the 2017 report to the state legislature last Friday.

Camp Rainbow Gold

Camp Rainbow Gold Board President Amanda Watson says it’s hard to give up on the proposed site in the Wood River Valley. The group has been focused on developing the site along East Fork Road outside of Sun Ketchum.

Ben Beard / Flickr Creative Commons

After two grocery stores closed in Nampa in 2016, it created a food desert for residents who used to walk to the markets. Fresh fruits, vegetables and unprocessed foods have since become virtually inaccessible for people without reliable transportation.

David Zalubowski / AP Images

It’s really hard to know how many Canada lynx exist in the Gem State, in part because of their secretive and solitary nature. According to U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist Bryon Holt, between 1960-1991 there were 70 verified records of the animals in Idaho, mostly in remote mountains in northern Idaho.

Aaron Rodriguez / Treefort Music Fest

Treefort Music Fest is bringing the heat in 2018 with some empowering female voices in the indie rap and R&B scene.

Inge Jørgensen / Flickr Creative Commons

In 2000, 532,000 people had home landlines in Idaho. The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) reports that this number fell to 152,000 last year. According to the Idaho Statesman, this shift has diminished a 30-year-old fund that keeps rural landlines affordable.

Otto Kitsinger / AP Images

In the wake of the #MeToo movement, the Idaho Legislature held mandatory sexual harassment training for all 105 lawmakers at the statehouse Tuesday. Senate President Pro-Tem Brent Hill (R-Rexburg) says the goal was to get everyone on the same page about what is and isn’t proper behavior at the capitol.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

In Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter’s final State of the State address Monday, education loomed large. One of his proposals is to hire a chief education officer for public colleges and universities.

Otto Kitsinger / AP Images

About 16,000 Ada County voters will see their precinct change in 2018. The changes come after the Treasure Valley’s growth continues to balloon.

Otto Kitsinger / AP Images

Leaders on both sides of the aisle at the Idaho statehouse agree on this: The issue of sexual harassment needs to be dealt with head-on this session.

Idaho Statesman

Communities around the world – including in Idaho – have grown accustomed to sending their recycled plastic to China. But on January first, a new Chinese policy went into effect that bans the importation of certain plastics.

Mike Carney / Flickr Creative Commons

Republic Services picks up paper, aluminum and plastics in southwest Idaho communities from Middleton to Mountain Home. The company is no longer accepting plastics numbered 3-7, which includes things like pipes, plastic bags, some food containers and plastic utensils.

via Google maps

Three years ago, William Higginson had friends coming to town for Christmas. They wanted to see what Boise had to offer for lighting spectacles, so he created a crowdsourced Google map pinpointing Christmas lights around the Treasure Valley. 


via Idaho Office for Refugees

Jan Reeves has been the director of the Idaho Office for Refugees since 1998, but he got his start in the field in the '80s – when resettlement was under the state Department of Health and Welfare.