Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

During Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue's visit to Idaho last week, the Trump administration official met with state leaders on a range of issues. He took a tour of the state Capitol in Boise alongside Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, and met with dairy producers and other agriculture leaders.

 

Perdue told reporters later on Friday the question of what to do about undocumented workers who fill agriculture jobs across the country is something he has talked with President Trump about often.

Google Maps / Surel's Place

Boise’s First Thursday is a well-known event in the Treasure Valley. Focused mostly on the visual arts – with music, theater and dance playing a role as well – it’s become a staple of the downtown scene each month.

Jimmy Emerson / Flickr Creative Commons

The Idaho Department of Labor says between 2015 and 2025, the state is expected to grow by 15 percent.

Using a new model to project these changes, the agency says the state’s pace is about three times higher than the nation’s when it comes to population.

So where is this boost coming from? The trend of older people moving to the state for retirement continues to lead the way. The department predicts the 65 and older crowd will grow by about 36 percent.

Paul Thompson / Flickr Creative Commons

Yellowstone National Park is now offering a reward of up to $25,000 for information about a wolf found shot in the park last month.

The National Park Service is investigating the death of a famous white female wolf. The service initially set a reward for information at $5,000. But park spokesperson Jonathan Shafer says a group of generous advocates have upped the ante.

“And we increased that amount to $25,000 as a result of a groundswell of interest from people who wanted to contribute to the reward fund,” says Shafer.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Water managers are crediting a new Idaho law with keeping water from leaving the state.

Idaho Department of Water Resources bureau chief Brian Patton says the updated policy is making things a little better for the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer. He says the state's existing water right is for one 1,200 cubic feet per second. But with all the snow southern Idaho received this winter, 15 times that amount was flowing down the river at different points.

A refugee from Boise imprisoned for terror charges is now in more trouble.

Fazliddin Kurbanov is serving 25 years in federal prison for conspiring and attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization. The 34-year-old refugee fled Uzbekistan in 2009, and lived in Boise until he was arrested in 2013.

Kurbanov has maintained his innocence, telling a federal judge during his sentencing last year that he’s never been a terrorist.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Apparently, Vogue is really into Idaho these days.

The formidable magazine published an online article titled “Why Boise, Idaho, Is a Growing Culinary Hotspot.” The piece, written by Jen Murphy, gives an overview of some of the well-loved local spots in the Capital City. Among them: Guru Donuts, the Basque Marketplace, Red Feather Lounge and State & Lemp.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

There’s a house in Garden City with strange noises happening inside.

Experimental electronic artist Gretchen Jude is playing around with all kinds of instruments, including the sound from a cracklebox. Jude is the artist-in-residence at Surel’s Place this month. She’s from Idaho, but has spent time in Japan and now lives in Hawaii – places that all come up in her newest piece which Jude will debut Friday night.

Matt Hintsa / Flickr Creative Commons

If you're new to Idaho, you may wonder how some Gem State places got their names.  Thankfully, historian and Idaho Statesman columnist Arthur Hart has you covered.

In a recent column, Hart went over the origins of a number of county names:

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Trump administration has proposed an 11 percent decrease in funding for the Interior Department.

If approved by Congress, the Interior Department would receive $11.7 billion for fiscal year 2018. That’s more than the president had originally outlined in an earlier budget draft, but still would be a hit to department funding.

Linn Kinter / Idaho Fish and Game

As we've reported, the Japanese yew is a commonly planted ornamental evergreen in Idaho -- with lethal ramifications for wildlife. Once an elk eats just a couple handfuls of the plant, the animal goes into cardiac arrest and dies within hours. Idaho Fish and Game estimates about 75 elk and pronghorn around the state died this winter from eating yew.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Toward the end of Table Rock Road in Boise, Bob DiGrazia points to a ridge a few hundred yards away.

“It was on January 5th I walked up here," he says. "And I could see birds and coyotes over here. Like coyotes on one carcass,  six to eight [of them].”

DiGrazia is a hunter and he often comes to this spot to just watch elk on the ridge grazing in the winter. That January day, he could see dead elk on the ground in distance. At first he thought poachers were to blame.

He called Idaho Fish and Game and a conservation officer came up right away.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

The Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial in Boise has been the target of a series of racist and anti-Semitic vandalism.

The first slurs were found Tuesday morning. Shortly after, Boise Parks and Recreation went to work removing and covering up the language scrawled on the marble.

Wednesday morning, a swastika was discovered on a tablet listing the donors to the memorial. It was drawn in permanent marker next to the name “Wood River Jewish Community.”

Samantha Wright/BSPR

Update 10:34 a.m. Thursday: Former Republican Lt. Governor David Leroy has filed paperwork to run for Labrador's seat. He is the first candidate to enter the race.

Earlier this week Republican Rep. Raul Labrador filed paperwork to run for Idaho governor, ending a long period of speculation about whether he would jump into the race. Now, political wonks are turning their attention to who might seek his congressional seat. 

Screengrab / Feeding America

A new report shows the number of people dealing with hunger in Idaho has dropped overall. But children in some parts of the state are still struggling to get enough to eat.

The annual study by Feeding America – a national network of food banks – shows that overall food insecurity in the state has decreased incrementally.

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