Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

sage grouse, wildlife
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Flickr Creative Commons

The Trump Administration plans to change how an iconic western species is managed. The new approach comes after Republican governors lobbied for a review of a plan to protect the greater sage grouse.


Lynn Friedman / Flickr Creative Commons

If you have a tree overflowing with fruit or a garden that needs some culling, a new website in the Treasure Valley could help you out.

screenshot / YouTube

Passions run high in a YouTube video showing an argument between a recreationist and a private land security guard in southwest Idaho.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Water managers in Idaho say the largest aquifer in the state has made significant gains this year.

The Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer provides water to the most productive agriculture fields in the state, and is essential to the economy. It also provides drinking water for about 200,000 people. But lately, its size was no match for Mother Nature as a series of droughts dwindled the water supply, along with growing demand from nearby industry.

Andrew Harnik / AP Images

The Trump Administration has nominated an Idaho attorney to lead the Interior Department’s legal team. Ryan Nelson has been the General Counsel at the Melaleuca Corporation for almost eight years.

The Idaho Falls-based nutritional supplements company is owned by billionaire and Republican donor Frank VanderSloot. In a statement, the CEO said “Ryan is a true patriot and I fully support his personal sacrifice in serving this country that he loves so much.”

Grizzly, wildlife, grizzlies, endangered species list
Jason Bechtel / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. government lifted protections for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone region on Monday, though it will be up to the courts to decide whether the revered and fearsome icon of the West stays off the threatened species list.

More than a month after announcing grizzlies in and around Yellowstone National Park are no longer threatened, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officially handed over management of the approximately 700 bears living across 19,000 square miles (49,210 sq. kilometers) in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming to wildlife officials in those states.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

It’s hard not to pick up a hammer and start working when you see the nearly destroyed Atlanta Club up-close. Built in the 1940s by a Yugoslavian bootlegger, the club has survived wildfires and the collapse of the mining industry in this tiny town northeast of Boise.

But this year's record winter was devastating for the building; after an unlucky mix of conditions the old roof couldn’t take it anymore. It collapsed one day, emitting a cloud of dust so thick it looked like smoke.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

OK river rats, here’s the scoop: Ada County will open Barber Park services this Saturday where you can start your day on the river. The tube and raft rentals open at 10 a.m., and the first shuttle departs Ann Morrison Park at noon, where floaters can take out.

For those new to the summertime experience, you can expect the float to take about two hours.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Tuesday, the U.S. Senate narrowly approved a motion to proceed with GOP health care legislation. Idaho’s two senators voted in favor of the motion. Sen. Mike Crapo and Sen. Jim Risch both voted in favor of the motion, which required a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Mike Pence to proceed.

The vote fell along party lines, but two Republican senators dissented.

Today Show

Idaho has been preparing for the Aug. 21 eclipse for years.

David Chang / via Instagram

Take one look at famous fine dining chef David Chang's Instagram feed and you can tell the guy has a thing for high-and-low brow combinations. In one picture this May, Chang was eating some greasy potato chips accompanied by a luxurious tin of caviar.

Turns out, the chef is a big fan of an Idaho food captured in this photo – but no – we aren't talking about potatoes. 

Bryant Olsen / Flickr

A tribe says it will seek possession of human bones found protruding from an Idaho badger hole after tests determined they weren't from modern day homicide victims but belonged to people who lived five centuries ago.

 

Shoshone-Paiute Tribe Chairman Ted Howard said Thursday that Shoshones have occupied the southwestern Idaho area for thousands of years and the well-preserved bones of a young adult and a 10- to 15-year-old should be returned to the tribe for proper burial.

Jesse L. Bonner / AP Images

Tuesday, the Idaho Supreme Court ruled in favor of Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter’s decision to veto a grocery tax repeal passed by the legislature this spring.

To recap: After the legislative session adjourned, the governor vetoed a bill written to get rid of the grocery tax. In response, a group of lawmakers filed suit against that veto – arguing the governor had made his veto decision too late – after the legal timeframe allowed. But now the court has agreed with the governor, and his veto stands.

Screengrab / Idaho Statesman

The skeletal remains of two people were found in a badger hole near Mountain Home by Idaho Fish and Game officers this spring. The Elmore County Sheriff’s office initially treated the findings as possible homicides. The sheriff’s office sent samples to Florida and Arizona for carbon dating analysis.

Tuesday, officials released the results of the test – which found that the remains could date as far back as 1436 and are no longer being investigated as homicides.  It's estimated the bones of one belonged to a person who died around the age 20, the other likely belonged a teenager.

Butch Otter, Idaho Governor
Otto Kitsinger / AP Images

Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter is back in the hospital after undergoing two back surgeries.

Otter first underwent surgery for a ruptured disc July 7. According to his office, the governor went home the following day but was still experiencing numbness and pain in his back. After more tests, he went through a second surgery last Friday. He briefly went home Saturday but then quickly returned after developing infection symptoms.

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