Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

Nicole Blanchard / Idaho Statesman

A national Democratic group is coming to Idaho on Saturday to try and help Idaho Democrats get a foothold in local races.

Idaho Statesman

Retired Boise Catholic priest W. Thomas Faucher made his first in-person appearance at the Ada County Courthouse this morning.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Surel’s Place is an artist-in-residency program on the banks of the Boise River in Garden City. The organization applied for their first NEA grant in 2017, knowing the likelihood of getting one in the first application was quite low.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Images

Tuesday, President Trump unveiled his long-awaited $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. But in order to streamline these projects, the administration is proposing changes to the way they are reviewed for environmental impact.

The National Environmental Policy Act was enacted in 1970. Called NEPA for short, the law was created after the construction of the Interstate Highways System damaged delicate ecosystems around the country.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Monday, February 12 would have been President Abraham Lincoln’s 209th birthday, which is a big deal for people like Dave Leroy. Leroy is Idaho’s unofficial Lincoln scholar, and has amassed quite a collection of artifacts connected to our 16th President over several decades.

Pussy Riot / via Facebook

Treefort Music Fest has released their third and final list of headliners set to play this year’s March extravaganza.

Erin Colonna / Flickr Creative Commons

When it comes to hop farming, the Pacific Northwest is king. Washington State leads the pack but Idaho eclipsed Oregon in 2017.

USFWS Mountain-Prairie / Flickr Creative Commons

Mountain lions in the Wood River Valley have forced wildlife managers to make some hard choices this winter.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Winemakers are hyper-focused when it comes to the environmental factors that influence the way their product is made. Soil, climate and location all affect wine grapes. Now, there’s evidence that wildfire smoke alters the way a wine tastes – regardless of the flavor of the grapes at harvest.

Jeremy Erickson / Flickr Creative Commons

The Treasure Valley’s verdant tree canopy gives the capital city more than just its nickname. According to a new report by the Treasure Valley Canopy Network, trees are one of our best tools in fighting back against climate change locally.

Susan Montoya Bryan / AP Images

Earlier this month, the Trump Administration announced a 30 percent tariff on imported solar panels.

Lynne Sladky / AP Images

The Mormon Church released a statement Friday in support of “Dreamer” immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Leaders from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints say politicians should “create policies that provide hope and opportunities” for these young people. They said these folks have “demonstrated a capacity to serve and contribute positively in our society” and that they should continue to be given that chance.

ep_jhu / Flickr Creative Commons

Ada County Judge Lyn Norton says opioid abuse has arrived in Idaho's most populous county, and that abuse can happen to anyone.

screenshot / Brewers Association

The Idaho craft beer industry has exploded in recent years. Between 2011 and 2016, the number of craft barrels produced in the state more than tripled. (For reference: A barrel is equal to two kegs.)

Clairvoyant Brewing

On a recent winter afternoon, Mike Francis stood on the brew deck at Payette Brewing Company in Boise. He pointed to four large stainless steel vessels surrounding him.


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