Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

Brad Washa / Boise National Forest

Firefighters continue to battle a large blaze in southern California that started last week. At its most dangerous, the wildfire threatened about 4,000 homes and has moved quickly in the dry and windy conditions.

In Idaho, the National Interagency Fire Center predicts a slightly milder – but still above average – fire season.

Kevin Micalizzi / Flickr Creative Commons

Later today, the Natural Resources Conservation Service will release a full report on snowpack and water levels in Idaho so far this year. The report will help paint a clearer picture of a complicated water scenario.

Water specialist Ron Abramovich says this year’s snowpack started off strong, but quickly dropped off. That makes for diverse stream levels.

Molly Messick / StateImpact Idaho

It’s been five months since the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., sparked a national gun debate. In Colorado, the state legislature there pushed through a ban on high-capacity magazines – the kind that were used to kill 12 people at a movie theater in Aurora, Co. last summer.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

A few hundred people rallied at a downtown park in Boise for immigration reform before marching to the Statehouse. As part of the national May Day rallies, Idaho labor unions, businesses and student groups came out in support of a U.S. Senate bill that would create a path to citizenship for immigrants who came to America illegally. 

Cristina McNeil is with the Idaho Community Action Network. She says that lobbying Congressman Raul Labrador to pass comprehensive immigration reform is an important part of the struggle.

DMeyer / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been two weeks since a deadly explosion at a Texas fertilizer facility claimed 14 lives and injured scores more. Investigators are still determining what caused the blast at the West Fertilizer Company.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

This morning, ironworkers celebrated the “topping off” at the Eighth and Main Tower in downtown Boise. Business and political leaders watched as the final beam was placed at the top of the 18-story building.

Visitors to the private event signed their names before the beam was hoisted above the city’s skyline.


Speaking from the windy rooftop, developer Kem Gardner thanked construction workers who have been building the Tower.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise’s Treefort Music Fest made some big strides in its second year. A month after the festival wrapped up, organizers say the festival grew more than was previously thought.

Monsanto

The deadly explosion at a fertilizer facility in West, Texas Wednesday, has put a spotlight on the industry.  According to NPR, 12 people died and 200 were injured. 

Sadie Babits / Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho running community will celebrate the 36th annual Race to Robie Creek this Saturday. But the half marathon has taken on new meaning for racers since two bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Brian Rencher has helped plan this weekend's race. He says organizers have been talking with the Boise Police Department and the Boise County Sheriff’s office about Monday’s bombing. 

Boise High School Evacuation 4-11-2013
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Five schools in southeast Idaho received violent threats this morning, disrupting classes, as police searched the schools. Boise High, Skyview High School in Nampa, Kuna High, and the Twin Falls Christian Academy all were evacuated after bomb threats were called in. Caldwell High School received a threat about a shooter.

Robin Wagner / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho’s regional airport towers have been given a short reprieve from federal budget cuts known as the sequester. That includes Idaho Falls, Pocatello, Lewiston and Hailey. The towers are now set to close on June 15th.

Closing the towers means planes could still fly, but pilots would take on the responsibilities the towers now hold.

Davis Cup -- John Isner
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

American tennis player John Isner lost in straight sets to Serbian Novak Djokovic in Boise this afternoon.

Djokovic is the No. 1 ranked tennis player in the world. Friday's match was the first in a series that will be played at the Taco Bell Arena for the Davis Cup quarterfinals.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

A new farmers market opens Saturday in Idaho’s capitol city. The Boise Farmers Market comes on the heels of a big dust-up with the city’s long-standing market. Now, each side says Boise can support both markets.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Davis Cup is one of the most important tournaments in the tennis calendar. This year the USA team faces Serbia on Boise State’s campus. Official matches won’t start until Friday, but on Wednesday tennis fans saw some of the best players in the world show off their skills.

Courtesy of the Idaho Statesman

It’s been more than a month since the federal budget cuts took effect. The across-the-board spending cuts impact federal agencies including the Pentagon and the FAA. American Indian tribes in Idaho are now beginning to see the impact of those cuts.

Amber Ebarb is a policy analyst at the National Congress of American Indians. She says for many tribes, the sequester could not have come at a worse time. She says there are nearly 18,000 American Indians eligible for services in Idaho.

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