Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

Molly Messick / Boise State Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the value of Idaho's agricultural production was down six percent in 2016.

Jeffrey W. Spencer / Flickr Creative Commons

Treasure Valley residents are approaching a consensus when it comes to mass transportation options: 73.9 percent say they want more ways to get around. That's according to the latest survey from Boise State, and it represents a 7 percent increase over last year.

potatoes
Kris Krug / Flickr Creative Commons

Wildfire smoke challenged the state’s potato crop this year as hazy skies blunted direct sunlight this summer. According to the Twin Falls Times-News, farmers dealt with weather extremes on both ends of the spectrum. An unusually wet and snowy start to the year saturated the soil, forcing later planting days in the spring.

Jimmy Emerson / Flickr Creative Commons

Courtney Conway had a big ask for a handful of Idaho ranchers in sage grouse country.

 


C. C. Chapman / Flickr Creative Commons

When we think of finite resources, it’s not likely that sand comes to mind. But according to new research from Jodi Brandt at Boise State, a global sand shortage could have big implications for growing communities like the Treasure Valley.

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Images

At the same time firefighters work to control the deadly flames in Northern California, a group of western politicians are pushing for a change in how these efforts are funded.


Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho senate has a new member. Governor Butch Otter has appointed an eastern Idaho man to fill a vacancy left by the former majority leader.


Andrew Harnik / AP Images

It might not be Halloween yet, but according to the Idaho Statesman – it’s probably time to make your Christmas tree plans.

OneBeat

Twenty-five international musicians are trying to practice diplomacy through music. If that seems like an impossible task, tell that to OneBeat fellow Sayun Chang. Chang is a percussionist from Taiwan, and OneBeat is the name of a traveling musical fellowship through the State Department.

AP Images

Bowe Bergdahl was the only American POW in the Afghanistan War, held captive by the Taliban for five years. After he was released, the Army Sergeant – who is from Idaho – was charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.


Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The City of Boise has begun its formal campaign to build support for a 5,000-seat downtown sports stadium.

Idaho State Historical Society

In our series of Legacy of Hate, we explore the Confederate connection to Idaho history and politics. 

City of Boise

Boise city officials have their sights set on 11 acres on the corner of Americana and Shoreline Drive for a 5,000-seat stadium, which would be the new home of the Boise Hawks baseball team. The Hawks currently play at Memorial Stadium in Garden City.


Susan Walsh / AP Images

Michael Dourson has consulted with companies including Dow Chemical and Koch Industries – according to the Intercept. He’s the Trump Administration pick to lead the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention at the EPA.


Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

In February, the city council in Charlottesville, Virginia voted to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee from a park which – at the time – had the same name. The controversy that followed culminated in a violent rally in the city this August, and renewed a discussion about white supremacy and what to do with Confederate monuments.

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