James Dawson

News Director

James Dawson joined Boise State Public Radio as the organization's News Director in 2017. He oversees the station's award-winning news department. 

Most recently, he covered state politics and government for Delaware Public Media since the station first began broadcasting in 2012 as the country's newest NPR affiliate. Those reports spanned two governors, three sessions of the Delaware General Assembly, and three consequential elections. His work has been featured on All Things Considered and NPR's newscast division. 

An Idaho native from north of the time zone bridge, James previously served as the public affairs reporter and interim news director for the commercial radio network Inland Northwest Broadcasting. His reporting experience included state and local government, arts and culture, crime, and agriculture.

He's a proud University of Idaho graduate with a bachelor's degree in Broadcasting and Digital Media. When he's not in the office, you can find James fly fishing, buffing up on his photography or watching the Seattle Mariners' latest rebuilding season.

Diana Robinson via Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho may be known as the land of potatoes, but some farmers are beginning to turn to canola as a new cash crop.

James Dawson

After 12 years as governor, Butch Otter still says the hardest decisions he’s ever had to make have been whether or not to follow through with the death penalty.

Idaho Capitol Dome
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Gov. Butch Otter on Wednesday allowed some of this year's most contentious measures to become law without his signature, allowing lawmakers to officially close out their work for the session without debating whether to override a pending veto.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Student scores on an Idaho reading test can still influence their teacher’s paycheck. After several hours of backroom meetings, the Idaho House quickly rejected the idea of overriding Gov. Butch Otter’s veto stamp Tuesday afternoon.

Photo courtesy of Francesca Fenzi, KNOM

Every year, Alaska’s frozen tundra calls to dog mushers for the Iditarod – the iconic 1,000-mile race from Anchorage to Nome.

 

But if you head up to America’s last frontier a bit earlier, you’ll see people biking, skiing – and even walking – the same trail in a punishing ultra marathon course.

James Dawson

Treefort Music Fest 2018 has been a whirlwind for festival goers, whether the came from near or far.

Thousands of people swarmed downtown Boise during the five-day festival for live music, arts and culture programs and even family-friendly events at Kid Fort.

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Idaho Sen. Jim Risch refused to vote on Congress’s $1.3 trillion spending plan until leadership removed a provision renaming the Boulder-White Clouds Wilderness, according to multiple media outlets.

Idaho Capitol Dome
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho House lawmakers have once again refused to consider a bill that would extend health insurance to low-income residents.

AP

An Idaho health care proposal to provide insurance to the needy that was deemed dead for the year by legislative leaders has been given a second chance at life.

Francis Delapena / Treefort Music Fest

Treefort Music Fest is in its seventh year taking over downtown Boise. It’s more than tripled in size since 2012, with about 420 bands booked across roughly two-dozen venues.

Zach Dischner via Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Boise will soon marry two of its residents’ favorite passions: mountain bikes and dogs.

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s legislative leaders say more needs be done to help prevent school shootings, bucking comments made last month by Gov. Butch Otter.

Ronda Churchill / AP

West Ada, poised to be one of the largest school districts in the nation, will add a sixth high school after voters approved a $95 million bond Tuesday night.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Monday, Idaho House lawmakers overwhelmingly approved a bill that would give judges more leeway in handing down sentences in drug trafficking cases.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

After hours of testimony and a split vote, Idaho House lawmakers will consider a bill giving judges more discretion in how to sentence alleged drug traffickers.

 

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