Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

Robert Davies / Flickr

With the total eclipse just a few days away and many people arriving or in the state already on their way to where they plan to watch the solar spectacle, cloud cover could make or break watching the show in the sky. We have a look at Eclipse Monday’s forecast.


Roadsidepictures / Flickr

As luck would have it, many of the small towns scattered across Idaho in the path of totality for this Monday’s solar eclipse are only accessible by small, two-lane roads. We’ve got some tips for those driving to watch day turn to night.


Quinn's Pond Water Recreation Kayak Outdoor Lifestyle Greenbelt
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

After being closed for the better part of summer, Boise officials are finally reopening Esther Simplot Pond. The move comes after E. coli levels in the pond went down and stayed consistently low.

Otto Kitsinger / Associated Press

Ultra-conservative state representative Heather Scott from North Idaho is defending so-called white nationalists in the aftermath of the events in Charlottesville. Over the weekend, Scott posted on her Facebook page that a white nationalist was someone who was for the Constitution and making America great again.


Three days after the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia and condemnations from all but one of Idaho’s congressional delegation, Representative Raul Labrador finally issued a statement.

Tuesday evening, following urging from Governor Butch Otter earlier in the day, Congressman Raul Labrador finally made his own statement about the events in Charlottesville.

In a release from his office, Labrador says he waited to respond because he didn’t want to insert himself in a national tragedy neither about him nor politics.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The eclipse is now less than a week away. As anticipation builds for this once-in-a-lifetime solar spectacle, logistical realities are setting in. Communities in the path of totality are expecting to be swarmed and are preparing for hordes of people.


AP

Mike Bullinger, the man wanted in connection to a triple homicide in the outskirts of Caldwell, continues to elude authorities. Local, state and federal law enforcement agencies are all hoping new information about the suspected murderer comes to light.


Shutter Runner / Flickr

With up to a million people predicted to come to Idaho to watch the solar eclipse on August 21, the sky is big business. While day turning to night is rare to see, the night sky is a spectacle unto itself.


Tom Banse

Just one electrical transmission line serves parts of the Wood River Valley. After years of debate, the proposal to build a second line as a backup is finally before the Idaho Public Utilities Commission.


Foothills Quinn's Pond Apartments
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

E. coli contamination continues plaguing Boise’s Esther Simplot Pond and preventing swimmers from beating the heat by taking a dip. After a summer of searching for the cause of the bacteria, officials may have finally found the source.


EarthFix

An agriculture group says the cost of saving salmon in the Northwest’s largest river system is unsustainable. Now, the Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association is turning to the Trump administration to try and sidestep endangered species laws.


KeyWestDavid / Flickr

With wildfires burning throughout southern Idaho and smoke from fires in neighboring states polluting the air, fire restrictions are beginning across much of the state this week.


Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

A murky, smoky haze hung over the Treasure Valley throughout the weekend limiting visibility and wrecking air quality. The dense cloud hid the foothills and added a yellowish cast to the hot summer sun. Smoke from fires in neighboring states is parking itself over Idaho and cooking into noxious fog.

Ali Noorani / Facebook

Immigration is a consistently hot-button topic, but since the President vowed to build that "big, beautiful wall" and proposed banning people from the U.S. who came from several Muslim-majority countries, it has remained at the forefront of political conversation.

wikimedia commons

We'll soon know if Meridian has crossed the threshold to become a city of 100,000 people. The Census Bureau conducted a population estimate July 1 and when the official numbers come in, it will likely find Meridian to be the second Idaho city with a six-figure population.

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