Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

Twitter: @SenatorRisch

Senator Jim Risch proposed a novel idea for protecting the nation's power grid from cyber threats. The senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee thinks we should rely less on electronics and more on humans to manage the nation's electricity.

The Republican senator cited a 2015 cyber attack on Ukraine's power grid as evidence for his proposal. Power was cut to some 215,000 Ukranians in the incident, but the outage would've been even more widespread had humans not still been in physical control of some elements of the grid.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The U.S. Attorney in Boise, Wendy Olson, is leaving her post Saturday after seven years in the top position and two decades with the office. Just two days before stepping down, Matt Guilhem spoke to Olson, an Idaho native, not just about her long career, but about her roots in the Gem State.

Wendy Olson's last day on the job is February 25. She'll be going into private practice at a Boise law firm.

 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

An informational hearing at the state capitol Wednesday centered on early childhood education.

The Senate Education Committee was scheduled to only hear about kindergarten and other early education resources for 20 minutes. However, questions from senators pushed the meeting to close to an hour.

Karl Stanton / Flickr Creative Commons

With backlashes at townhall meetings held by congressional representatives across the country, Idaho’s own Congressional delegation isn’t setting any public meetings with constituents during the current recess.

There’s a missing persons campaign afoot for Idaho’s D.C. contingent.

Posters announcing a mock missing persons campaign for Idaho’s D.C. contingent are making the rounds on social media and on street lights in downtown Boise. The posters say: “Missing: Have You Seen This Man?” and feature pictures of Senator Mike Crapo or Senator Jim Risch.

vote, election
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Despite a concerted advertising campaign by the College of Western Idaho to pass a $180 million bond, the measure failed on the November ballot. 

Now, CWI is examining the loss. The bond would have been used to construct a new CWI campus in Boise and expand the college’s footprint in Nampa.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Hundreds of students from around Boise were absent from class Thursday morning as they gathered on the steps of the Statehouse to voice their concern over Betsy DeVos, President Trump's secretary of education.

The rally was organized by Nora Harren and Colette Raptosh, the pair of high school students who spearheaded the Women's March Idaho, which drew thousands to the state capitol in the cold and snow the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump.

splcenter.org

A report out this week from the Southern Poverty Law Center finds the number of hate groups went up between 2015 and last year.

According to the center, which tracks incidents of violence and hate, there were 917 bigoted organizations operating in the country last year – up from 892 in 2015. The Southern Poverty Law Center currently monitors 12 hate groups in Idaho.

Bureau of Reclamation / WaterArchives.org | Flickr Creative Commons

The recent threat of catastrophic flooding at the Oroville Dam in Northern California has abated for the moment, but the incident dredged up old memories of Idaho's own dam catastrophe.

In June of 1976, the earthen Teton Dam in eastern Idaho failed, killing 11 people and causing $2 billion in damage. It cost $100 million to construct, but the government ended up paying over thrice that in damage claims linked to the failure.

John Milner / Flickr Creative Commons

The Sun Valley Resort has shut down Bald Mountain for fear of extreme avalanche danger.

While the resort has received some 50 inches of snow in just the last few days, warmer temperatures plus winds and freezing rain are making for a dangerous mix. With temperatures above 40 degrees, the situation on the mountainside is touch and go.

Once it's deemed safe, Bald Mountain will be reopened.

Flickr Creative Commons

The Canyon County Fair isn’t going anywhere; it’ll stay at its home in Caldwell. County commissioners made the announcement earlier this week, ending a proposed move for the fair to an 80 acre property north of Nampa.

Boise River, snow, weather
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The National Weather Service considers the snow season running from October to May; so far this year, Boise has seen 37.6 inches – significant, but not close to an all-time record.

AP

The Idaho Transportation Department says it's going to re-pave a section of Interstate 84 between Nampa and Caldwell this summer instead of next year. 

Specifically, ITD is looking to refurbish the section between Franklin Boulevard in Nampa and Franklin Road in Caldwell during the warmer months.

Almost Sunrise / Facebook

A documentary detailing two Iraq War veterans' tribulations upon returning to the U.S. from combat is showing Friday evening at Boise State.

'Almost Sunrise' follows Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson as they walk across the country to find themselves and process the experience of war. 

The film's director, Michael Collins, spoke with our Matt Guilhem before his trip to Boise.

Joe Jaszewski / Idaho Statesman

Oddly enough, you can buy fireworks in Idaho, but detonating aerial types in the state is illegal. The Table Rock Fire started unintentionally with illegal fireworks on June 30th of last year; the total cost of battling the flames ended up around $341,000.

Immediately following the fire, Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan called the fireworks policy “absolutely ludicrous.”

Now, Doan is asking lawmakers to prohibit the sale of fireworks in Idaho.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

Idaho's entirely Republican political delegation in Washington DC offered kind words for President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee.

Both Senator Mike Crapo and Representative Raul Labrador praised Trump's selection of Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the vacancy left by the late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia.

Idaho Statesman

The president's executive action is getting mixed reactions from the business community in Idaho. The spectrum of responses runs from concern for workers' families and the talent pool – to silence.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

More than 600 people held signs, chanted and demonstrated yesterday at the Boise Airport in opposition to President Donald Trump’s executive order banning refugees from entering the country.

“No hate. No Fear. Refugees are welcome here!” resounded through the concourse between the airport’s check-in counters and security area.

Keith Ridler / AP

As priorities and strategy dramatically shift in Washington DC with Donald Trump assuming the presidency, officials at the Idaho National Lab are altering their narrative to better align with the new administration.

With Trump's White House saying the jury is out on climate change and a lack of clarity on the direction of energy research, INL officials plan to focus less on themes surrounding greenhouse gases and more on the facility's role in energy security and as a font of good jobs.

flu, flu shot, sickness
US Army Corps Of Engineers / Flickr Creative Commons

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the flu is particularly widespread and acute in the Gem State this year. Ten people over the age of 50 have died from the flu so far this season in Idaho.

Boise’s Saint Alphonsus Medical Center reports seeing a spike in instances of flu this January compared to the same month last year. A spokesperson tells the Statesman the hospital has seen a 300 percent increase in cases of the illness.

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Projects centering on STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering and Math — took over the capitol rotunda in Boise Tuesday. From robots launching balls through a hoop to projects engineered out of Legos, the skills of tomorrow were on show by the students of today.

Among the displays at the event, one from the Wilder School District stands out. It focuses on an animation program that brings cartoons to the classroom. Jeff Dillon, superintendent of the Wilder School District and Wilder Elementary principal, explains the appeal to young students.

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