Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

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Ketchum is getting back to its roots this Labor Day weekend by celebrating Wagon Days. The annual event reconnects the famed resort city to its Old West origins as a mining town.


Footage from a police body camera showing a nurse in Salt Lake City being arrested is going viral. Her skirmish with authorities stems from her refusal to allow city police to draw blood from an unconscious reserve officer with the Rigby Police Department who’s recuperating at the hospital.


Thomas Hawk / Flickr

With four more months to go until the end of the year, the number of firearms found by TSA officials at the Boise Airport this year has already eclipsed the number found in all of 2016.


Tatters / Flickr Creative Commons

A popular but toxic landscaping plant blamed for more than a hundred wildlife deaths over the last two winters isn’t going to be listed as a noxious weed.

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The building housing one of Boise's last true neighborhood markets is for sale. Southeast Boise’s Roosevelt Market has been a community fixture for nearly 120 years.

MPCA Photos / Flickr

Officials issued a health warning after dangerous levels of toxic blue-green algae were detected in Lake Lowell west of Boise. The blooms are turning the shores of the lake into a murky batch of pea soup.


CECIL D. ANDRUS PAPERS, SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES, BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

Remembrances of Idaho political icon Cecil Andrus are pouring in from leaders across the state and the nation. The former governor founded a public policy center at Boise State University after retiring from politics. The center’s director, John Freemuth, was a longtime associate of the late Andrus.

He says knowing his boss and friend was an ongoing education.


Plymouth District Library / Flickr

A new report finds Idaho students face more cyberbullying than kids in any other state. While the Gem State tops the list, other rural states also rank highly.

The Idaho Department of Education says one in five high school students has been cyberbullied. That backs up new findings from education company Educents which says a little over 21 percent of 9-12 graders have been the victims of cyberbullying. The report says 26 percent of high schoolers have reported on-campus bullying.

College of Idaho / Facebook

The president of the College of Idaho announced Thursday she’s stepping down from her leadership role. The departure comes as a surprise.

Charlotte Borst has filled the top job at the Caldwell college since being appointed two years ago. She was the 13th president of the liberal arts school.

 

Yellowstone National Park / Flickr

Although Craters Of The Moon National Monument in the eastern part of the state wasn’t directly in the path of totality, the otherworldly landscape proved a popular destination with eclipse-watchers. The monument near Arco saw a record amount of visitors and made a big announcement.


Kevin Bean

Monday’s total solar eclipse dazzled viewers in Idaho and across the nation. In the Gem State, crowds and traffic were predicted to reach astronomical levels, but – thankfully – the influx of visitors and vehicles remained manageable, for the most part.

One of the most picturesque and popular places to watch the eclipse in Idaho was Stanley. Perched in the Sawtooth Mountains, the tiny town was told to brace for 20,000 eclipse watchers coming in for the event. However, Stanley City Councilman Steve Botti says the town probably got closer to 10,000 visitors.


Robert Davies / Flickr

With the total eclipse just a few days away and many people arriving or in the state already on their way to where they plan to watch the solar spectacle, cloud cover could make or break watching the show in the sky. We have a look at Eclipse Monday’s forecast.


Roadsidepictures / Flickr

As luck would have it, many of the small towns scattered across Idaho in the path of totality for this Monday’s solar eclipse are only accessible by small, two-lane roads. We’ve got some tips for those driving to watch day turn to night.


Quinn's Pond Water Recreation Kayak Outdoor Lifestyle Greenbelt
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

After being closed for the better part of summer, Boise officials are finally reopening Esther Simplot Pond. The move comes after E. coli levels in the pond went down and stayed consistently low.

Otto Kitsinger / Associated Press

Ultra-conservative state representative Heather Scott from North Idaho is defending so-called white nationalists in the aftermath of the events in Charlottesville. Over the weekend, Scott posted on her Facebook page that a white nationalist was someone who was for the Constitution and making America great again.


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