Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

IIP Photo Archive / Flickr Creative Commons

Two big wildfires likely sparked by Monday’s thunderstorms continue to burn an hour east of Boise.

The smaller of the two fires is the Sand Point Fire. Firefighters have successfully held containment lines of the roughly 7,800 acre blaze and kept it from threatening structures. It’s burning about three miles south of Hammett. Emergency responders expect to have the Sand Point Fire contained by this evening.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Workers at a Twin Falls potato processing plant are claiming the company is trying to bust up a bid to join a local branch of the Teamsters Union next month.

Employees of Lamb-Weston, a subsidiary of ConAgra Foods based in Eagle that specializes in potato products, claim a so-called “union busting firm” has been hired to dissuade workers at a Twin Falls plant from joining Teamsters Local Union 483.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

After being constructed in secret by a small group of Republican senators, a push is underway to pass a bill reforming the nation's health care system.

For perspective on what changes could be in store both nationally and in Idaho, Matt Guilhem spoke to Dr. David Pate, the President and CEO of St. Luke's Health System.

Lafe / Flickr

In the run up to the Fourth of July, fireworks are now on sale at licensed stands. With the memory of last summer’s Table Rock Fire still fresh, officials are asking people to be mindful of where they detonate their pyrotechnics.

The Table Rock Fire scorched four square miles of the Boise foothills and burned destroyed one home last year; it started with an illegal Roman candle.

Even so-called “safe and sane” fireworks can start wildfires and present a danger if set off improperly or in areas close to accelerants like fuel or dried brush.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s oldest and tallest sequoia moved over the weekend. While the evergreen only went a short distance, the process of moving an 800,000 pound tree is no small feat.

Late Saturday night, two huge excavators make that familiar beep as they slowly back up, pulling the big tree out of its spot by St. Luke’s Hospital. With Fort Street shut down, a crowd assembles to watch the hundred-foot-tall tree make its journey of about 1,200 feet down the road.

Todd F. Niemand / Flickr

Several motorcycle deaths throughout the Treasure Valley over the last week or so are causing alarm and raising questions about safety.

In a little over a week, five people around the Valley were killed in motorcycle accidents: three in Boise, one in Canyon County and another in Boise County.

The five deaths in such a short amount of time are particularly surprising given there were just five motorcycle deaths across the Treasure Valley in all of 2010.

Create Common Good

Summertime in Boise is synonymous with being outside. Before going on a hike or maybe after perusing Boise’s downtown farmer’s market this weekend, you can stop by the first Feed Your Soul Festival put on by the nonprofit Create Common Good. The free family event offers food trucks, craft beer, games and live music.

In an email interview, the group’s CEO, Tracy Hitchcock, says Create Common Good got its start in 2008 as a response to the financial crisis.

Nicholas D. / Flickr

Washington County Commissioners passed an emergency declaration ahead of what many think will be a massive influx of visitors for August's solar eclipse.

The town of Weiser has a little over 5,000 residents. The tiny community on the Oregon border could swell up to six times that size during the third weekend in August which will culminate in a total eclipse Monday, August 21.  

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

After 57 years at the intersection of Collister and State Street in Boise, 20th Century Lanes is closing down June 30. A community fixture since Eisenhower was in the White House, the same family has operated the alley for generations.

Blaine County Sheriff / Facebook

The Big Wood River again rose above flood stage this week. It’s the fifth time since early May. Damage assessments from the devastating flood season are finally set to get underway.

State and federal emergency management officials will meet with county and city leaders in the Wood River Valley the week of June 26 to examine the toll spring flooding took on infrastructure in the region.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

BASE jumper Miles Daisher reclaimed his record for the most human-powered jumps in 24 hours off the Perrine Bridge in Twin Falls Tuesday morning.

Daisher hurled himself off the Perrine Bridge, hiked up the canyon wall and rode a bike to the jump spot in the middle of the bridge 63 times. Daisher was looking to complete 62 jumps to reclaim the unofficial record from his rival Danny Weiland.

In September, Weiland leapt off the bridge 61 times to beat Daisher’s old record of 57 BASE jumps.

Sean Pyle / Flickr

A four-day job fair gets underway in Caldwell this morning. A wide variety of industries will be participating in the event at the Idaho Department of Labor’s Canyon County office.

The largest job fair in recent memory, different sectors will be at the site looking to hire new talent each day.

Charles Peterson / Flickr

After waters raged over Shoshone Falls earlier in the spring, the Bureau of Reclamation cut the flow of the Snake River over the scenic landmark to a trickle. However, the flow is going back up and the falls will again be a spectacle.

Whether a lot or a little water is flowing over Shoshone Falls, the landmark is something to see. However, when the amount of water plummeting more than 200 feet over the falls is greater than 15,000 cubic feet per second, the falls live up to their nickname: “The Niagara of the West.”

Catherine Chanel / Flickr

As floodwaters in the Wood River Valley recede, residents and officials are getting their first look at damage caused by a season of high water.

For six weeks the Big Wood River has inundated parts of Hailey. With summer just days away, the high spring flows are finally ebbing. As the river recedes, damage to homes, roads and electrical equipment that was underwater is finally coming into view.

Youtube

Former state senator Russ Fulcher of Meridian is bowing out of the race for governor and pursuing a run for Congress.

After spending the last nine months running to replace Governor Butch Otter, Fulcher now has his sights set on filling Raul Labrador’s shoes in Washington D.C. The five-term Republican lawmaker released a video online making the announcement.

Pages