Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

Scott Lowe / Flickr

The Idaho Department of Labor is out with its latest monthly jobs report. It finds the state’s unemployment rate has held steady for half a year.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

After discussing future plans for Boise’s Highlands Elementary for more than a year, the Boise School District decided to tear down the 1961 campus and start from scratch.

Several criteria were evaluated before making the call to tear down the old campus nestled in north Boise, including educational impact and safety and budgetary constraints.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Treefort Music Fest is taking over downtown Boise. More than 400 bands are scheduled to play over the five day festival. For this installment of Wanna Know Idaho, we take a look at how the selection process works.

Ada County Sheriff's Office

Boise Police arrested a former local pastor who was held captive in Iran for the better part of three years for violating a no contact order with his estranged wife.

AP

March Madness is sweeping the country, but the fever is especially pronounced in Boise. Several NCAA basketball games were held at Taco Bell Arena on Thursday and Saturday. It was the first time the City of Trees hosted the tournament since 2009.

Julochka / Flickr

Maybe you love them, maybe you hate them – or maybe you are one. Millennials are an ascendant generation; the youthful cohort is expected to eclipse Baby Boomers as the biggest generational group in 2019. Next year, it’s expected millennials in the U.S. will number 73 million. The boomers will recede to just under 72 million that year. As for Gen-X, sorry gang. You’re not going to pass the boomers until 2028, but you’re stereotyped as slackers, so it makes sense, right?

fossilmike / Flickr

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo’s bill to ease financial protections established by the Dodd-Frank Act passed in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis got the green light from the U.S. Senate this week. Crapo’s proposal drew bipartisan support.

Idaho National Laboratory

The federal government is looking into keeping a treatment facility for nuclear waste in eastern Idaho online longer than previously expected.

christopher sebela / Flickr

The reward for information about a January incident in Burley involving a fire and a pipe bomb has been raised.

capitol, statehouse, idaho
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The deadline to file as a candidate in the upcoming May primary passed at 5 p.m. Friday, March 9.

Twelve people are running for governor according to the Secretary of State’s office. Familiar names in Idaho politics are on the list: Raul Labrador, Brad Little and A.J. Balukoff to name a few. And two candidates who went viral in the 2014 governor’s race – Walter Bayes and Harley Brown – are also running.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The federal government weighed in on Idaho’s attempt to skirt provisions in the Affordable Care Act. On Thursday, the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services sent a letter to state leaders warning them they were on thin ice with the proposed policies.

Larry Darling / Flickr

The saga surrounding the leadership of the New Plymouth School District continues to unfold.

Alexey Kljatov / Flickr

A new study from Oregon State University finds snowpack is in decline across the West.

Cesar Astudillo / Flickr

The Senate passed a bill Wednesday cracking down on slow vehicles impeding traffic on the highway.

Like the famous song, you could say Idaho residents like to live “Life In The Fast Lane.”

A fairly divided Idaho Senate voted 22 to 13 in favor of a bill making it illegal to block the flow of traffic in the fast lane for any extended period of time. Violators could face a fine of $90.

The legislation was initially introduced by  Representative Lance Clow (R-Twin Falls).

SalFalko / Flickr

A ruling this week in favor of two transgender women will allow individuals to change the sex listed on their birth certificates. That’s a significant change in policy from Idaho’s former automatic denial of such requests.

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