Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

U.S. Capitol, Washington, DC
VPickering / Flickr Creative Commons

The response to the President’s budget among Idaho’s political delegation in Washington, D.C. is tepid. The Trump Administration proposes cutting spending by $3.6 trillion over the next decade.

In a statement, GOP Senator Jim Risch reminded people that Congress, not the President, actually appropriates funds. Risch characterized the proposed budget as a blueprint of the Trump Administration’s priorities.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Poll data released by Idaho Politics Weekly shows a majority of Idahoans support re-designating Craters of the Moon National Monument a national park.

The poll finds 55 percent of state residents are in favor of bumping up Craters to the more prestigious and visible national park status; 32 percent don't want to see the vast lava fields changed from their current state.

Courtesy Ivan Vazquez

Tuesday night, seniors at Capital High in Boise will graduate. Among the class of 2017 is Ivan Vazquez. He’s not only the valedictorian, but he’s one of just five students across the country this year to be accepted to all eight Ivy League colleges.

Matt Guilhem spoke with Vazquez about school, his future plans and what it was like as the acceptance letters kept pouring in.

For more local news, follow the KBSX newsroom on Twitter @KBSX915

Copyright 2017 Boise State Public Radio

Blaine County Sheriff / Facebook

Officials in Blaine County are telling residents water levels in the Big Wood River will rise again.  

Cooler temperatures and a momentary reprieve from flooding in the Wood River Valley are being called “the eye of the hurricane.” Speaking to a group at the Community Campus, Hailey City Councilman Don Keirn invoked the imagery while reminding people there's still plenty of snow yet to melt in the mountains.

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

U.S. Congressman Mike Simpson says he’s inclined to believe former FBI Director James Comey over President Donald Trump. The comments come in the wake of new details emerging about the investigation of Michael Flynn.

Speaking to reporters this week, Simpson says he’s afraid members of the GOP aren't doing enough to head off a possible crisis similar to Watergate.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

A famed sculptor who calls Florence, Italy home finishes up a two-week course he’s teaching students in Boise State’s Fine Arts program today. A trip to his workshop is like a trip back in time.

Besides the constant clacking of chisels against blocks of imported Carrara marble, one of the most striking things about stepping into the back sculpture studio at the Ben Victor Gallery on campus is the dust. Little chips of rock and dust fly from each student’s block as they turn white stone into art.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Congressman Raul Labrador introduced a bill in the House Tuesday seeking to tighten enforcement of immigration laws and cracking down on so-called Sanctuary Cities.

The bill is called the Davis-Oliver Act; it’s named after two California law enforcement officers who were killed in 2014 by an undocumented immigrant.

Among the provisions of the bill are requirements that all applicants for a visa to the U.S. undergo additional screening. Part of that enhanced vetting includes letting security agencies access an applicant’s social media profiles.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Members of the Idaho Senate from the right and the left jointly filed a petition to intervene in the lawsuit over Governor Butch Otter's veto of a bill that would've repealed the state's tax on groceries.

The official launch party for Boise Bike Week is Monday evening at Highlands Hollow, but rides and events are taking place this weekend.

A bike corral will be at Saturday morning’s market in downtown Boise, and on Sunday there’s a brunch and ride.

National bike to work day comes on Friday, May 19. If you park a bicycle in the special bike valet in front Bittercreek Alehouse downtown, you can score a free beer between 3 and 8 p.m.

Idaho Capitol Dome
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The field of candidates for Idaho’s Lt. Governor has again increased. There are now five GOP hopefuls seeking the position.

The former chairman of the state’s Republican Party, Steve Yates, is the most recent to throw a hat in the ring for Lt. Governor. The businessman from eastern Idaho previously served as an aid to Vice President Dick Cheney.

Penn State / Flickr

A new report from the U.S. Geological Survey says southeast Idaho is overdue for an earthquake. Sometime within the next 50 years, USGS says the so-called “big one” will start rattling southeast Idaho along the Bear Lake Fault.

They estimate the likelihood of a magnitude 6.0 quake coming in the next half-century at 63 percent.

Idaho Fish and Game

After an emergency declaration was issued for Blaine County Monday by Lt. Gov. Brad Little, the Army Corps of Engineers say they're sending a small group to the region to help with flooding.

The Corps is sending a three person crew to assess flood risks to public infrastructure and help Blaine County emergency management staff. Members of the Army Corps team are experts in both hydraulic and civil engineering. Another task the group will assist with is coming up with contingency plans should a worst case scenario unfold.

City of Twin Falls

In a 5-to-2 vote Monday, the Twin Falls City Council decided to label the community a “Neighborly City.”

In the run-up to the decision, the city council heard more than three hours of public comment at meetings over the last month.

The “Neighborly City” label is a tamer version of declarations other cities have made calling themselves either “Welcoming” or “Sanctuary Cities” where federal immigration law is either downplayed or outright flouted.

Dave Thomas / Flickr

The warm temperatures late last week are being blamed for rising flood waters in parts of Blaine and Elmore Counties.

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Organizers of Idaho Gives say the day-long event to raise money for Idaho nonprofits was a success. With donations topping $1.3 million, organizers beat their goal.

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