Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

Idaho Freedom Foundation

Following last month’s election, some form of legal marijuana use is allowed in every state that borders Idaho. The Gem State’s strict prohibition of cannabis – even for medicinal purposes – goes against a national trend of increased access.

The libertarian-leaning Idaho Freedom Foundation advocates legalizing a medical form of pot used to treat disorders like epilepsy. The group’s president, Wayne Hoffman, discussed their position with our Matt Guilhem.

Brent Moore / Flickr Creative Commons

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said he’ll deport all 11 million undocumented people in the U.S. Lacking legal status, they fill many jobs – especially in farming. With Idaho solidly conservative, we wondered how those in agricultural areas reconciled their business interests with their politics.

Steve Millington is sitting in the back corner of the Twin Falls Perkins restaurant when we meet in the late morning. He’s the chairman of the Twin Falls County Republican Party and an avowed fan of breakfast; he has a plate of eggs, bacon and pancakes while we chat.

AP

The Idaho Statesman has joined some other red-state newspapers in endorsing the Democratic candidate for president. Hillary Clinton picked up the paper’s support in an editorial published last week. The last time The Statesman endorsed a Democrat for president was Barack Obama’s first campaign in 2008.

NPR

You hear Paula Poundstone most weekends on NPR’s "Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me" on KBSX 91.5 FM.

Throughout her nearly 40 year career, she’s been an author, late night TV personality, and actress. Ahead of her appearance in Boise Saturday night, Matt Guilhem spoke to Poundstone about her lengthy career, getting her start and Idaho. 

When most people want to play a game, the first thing they reach for is likely a smartphone or tablet. Actual pinball machines have become quaint curiosities, but a father-son duo in California is keeping these old-school games alive in a museum.

The Museum of Pinball is hidden away in an old industrial building, just off Interstate 10 and about 90 miles east of Los Angeles in Banning, Calif. It's pretty quiet when the rows upon rows of pinball machines are not turned on. But once the switch is flipped, it gets loud.

The investigation into Wednesday's mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., is impacting the lives of tens of thousands of people with developmental disabilities.

The attack, which claimed the lives of 14 people and wounded 21 others, targeted a holiday party for county public health employees at the Inland Regional Center, which provides vital services for about 30,000 developmentally disabled people.

As authorities continue to delve into the shooting, the IRC remains closed, cutting off care for approximately 30,000 individuals in the Inland Empire.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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