Samantha Wright

News Reporter/Show Producer

Samantha Wright is a news reporter and the host for Boise State Public Radio's new weekly podcast, "Legislative Breakdown".

Her spot reporting, special projects, and audio production have been featured on Voice of America, National Public Radio News, This American Life, National Native News, the Northwest Radio Network and on The New York Times website. Samantha earned a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Use of Sound for her feature “Co-op Cooks.”  She also earned a first place award for Use of Sound for her feature “Canning Makes a Comeback” from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Incorporated. Samantha was a co-producer of the Idaho StoryCorps Project. The project was recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The finish line is in sight for the Idaho Legislature. Lawmakers pushed through nearly 100 bills this week as they worked to wrap up and go home. They won’t officially end until next week, even though they’ve worked through the major issues of the 2018 session.

John Watson / Flickr

Despite a lot of cooking this session, the Idaho Legislature failed to make “soup” out of Governor Butch Otter’s health care bill.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Federal agencies that govern the Boise River plan to increase the amount of water flowing downstream Wednesday. But experts do not expect a repeat of the dramatic flooding seen last year.

Charlie Litchfield / AP Photo

Just a few days remain in this year’s legislative session.

If Idaho lawmakers wrap up things next week as they plan to do, it will have been a shorter, but busier session than usual.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

If you’re listening to Legislative Breakdown every week, chances are you probably also check in day-to-day to the Eye on Boise blog from the Spokesman Review.

The blog is THE spot to find out what’s happening during every hour of the legislature in real time and the reporter who makes it all happen is Betsy Russell.

You can find her running, literally, from committee meeting to protest to press conference, working hard to keep up.

Zoo Boise

Zoo Boise says Katarina, their 14-year-old Amur tiger, had to be put down after a back injury.

John Miller / Associated Press

Idaho could soon adopt its own "stand your ground" law after House lawmakers sent the bill to Governor Butch Otter’s desk Tuesday.

Nicholas K. Geranios / AP Photo

Rachel Dolezal, the former education director at Coeur d’Alene’s Human Rights Education Institute, will star in a new Netflix documentary after she claimed to be "transracial".

Otto Kitsinger / Associated Press

A bill to increase Idaho’s new child tax credit was introduced in the legislature Friday.

Mike McBirney / Monarch Butterflies In the Pacific Northwest Facebook Page

A butterfly, born and raised in the Treasure Valley, has flown all the way to the Pacific coast.

The monarch, nicknamed Monet, is part of a Washington State University study that tags and follows the winged invertebrates during their life cycle.

Otto Kitsinger / Associated Press

The Idaho Legislature is just a couple of weeks away from going home and bills are moving through at a furious pace -- at least in the House.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Who doesn’t like sausage? Tastes great at breakfast, but it can get kind of ugly when there’s just two weeks left in the Idaho Legislature.

Facebook

Idaho lawmakers are considering a bill that would force school districts, and other taxing entities, to take a year-long breather between each attempt to pass a bond.

AP Photo

Thursday, the Idaho Senate passed Governor Butch Otter’s massive tax cut bill on a vote of 26-9. It had already passed the House and now just needs Otter's signature to become law. The bill cut taxes for some in Idaho and creates a $130 dollar child tax credit.

Otto Kitsinger / AP Photo

The Idaho Health Care Plan and redistricting: two of the big topics the Idaho Legislature dealt with this week.

The health care bill ground to an abrupt halt, with several Republicans calling it an expansion of Medicaid in Idaho. That move from lawmakers dealt a blow to Governor Butch Otter, who had been touting the plan around the country.

And legislators are also considering a new plan for how redistricting gets done in Idaho.

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