Samantha Wright

News Reporter/On-air Host

Samantha Wright is a news reporter and the local host for Boise State Public Radio's All Things Considered on weekday afternoons.

Her spot reporting, special projects, and audio production have been featured on Voice of America, National Public Radio News, This American Life, National Native News, the Northwest Radio Network and on The New York Times website. Samantha earned a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Use of Sound for her feature “Co-op Cooks.”  She also earned a first place award for Use of Sound for her feature “Canning Makes a Comeback” from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Incorporated. Samantha was a co-producer of the Idaho StoryCorps Project. The project was recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The 2015 Treefort Music Fest ramps up Friday with the opening of its main stage in downtown Boise.  By the time the event ends Sunday, more than 400 bands will have entertained thousands of indie music fans.  One of those fans is journalist David Greenwald.  He writes about music for the Oregonian newspaper.

According to Sue Paul, the Executive Director of the Warhawk Air Museum, Vietnam veterans never got the respect they deserved. Paul says it’s time to put things right and look at the war as a military action, without all the politics and the Hollywood myths that have sprung up over time.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the war, Warhawk teamed up with the Department of Defense to host a series of educational talks on the history of Vietnam.

Forty-seven years ago, Boise filmmaker Ken Rodgers found himself in the middle of the longest battle of the Vietnam War. Now, his mission is to make sure no one ever forgets the men he fought with.

Rodgers’ documentary film “Bravo! Common Men, Uncommon Valor” is a look back at the battle of Khe Sanh.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Hyde Park Books, a staple in the North End of Boise for 30 years, is closing its doors.

Marti Martino bought the used bookstore in 2013. She says the store has had just three owners in its long history.

She says she’s heartbroken for her family and for the community. “It’s kind of still raw for me. It’s been something we’ve been thinking about for quite some time,” Martino says. “We haven’t made this decision lightly by any manner. I understand it’s been an icon in the community for quite some time. But unfortunately it’s not sustainable.”

Courtesy of American Center for Law and Justice

In the midst of an unexpected break in Iranian nuclear talks, President Barack Obama is calling for the return of Americans held in Iran, including Boise pastor Saeed Abedini.

In a message commemorating the Persian New Year, Obama says it's a time for families to be reunited.

Hopeful in NJ / Flickr

In just the last few weeks, Treasure Valley gas prices have increased by nearly 75 cents. Low oil prices caused the cost of gas to drop to less than $1.80 per gallon late last year. Oil prices are still low, but now gas is at $2.53.

Zoo Boise

Two wallaby mothers are showing off their new babies at Zoo Boise. Baby wallabies, known as joeys, spend most of their early months inside their mother’s pouch.

Mothers Abbey and Kaiya are both Bennett’s wallabies, a species that comes from Australia and are related to kangaroos. Both Abbey and Kaiya were also born at the zoo, in 2010 and 2011.

The zoo doesn’t know the gender of the joeys yet. That will come with their first veterinary exams. Kaiya’s joey is five-months-old. Abbey’s is three-months-old.

Mark K. / Flickr

Boise and surrounding cities could break a record Tuesday, but keep a rain slicker handy for the storm moving in Wednesday night.

“Today we’re going for a high of 71, the record high for today is 73 in Boise, so it’s going to be close,” says National Weather Service meteorologist Dave Groenert.

Normally this time of year would see highs around 53 degrees.

Curt Bowen

We’ve been following an Idaho non-profit over the years as it helps farmers in Guatemala grow more sustainable crops. We first learned of Semilla Neuva - that’s “New Seed” in Spanish - in 2011. The fledgling group was giving advice on farming techniques to Guatemalan farmers.

Karen Day

Last April, we told you the story of one Idaho woman filmmaker struggling to make a documentary about a pioneer of Idaho filmmaking.

Jeffrey Johnson / Boise State University

Jeffrey Johnson got quite a wakeup call this week. The assistant professor of geosciences at Boise State University is working in Pucon, Chile on a Fulbright grant to study volcanoes. He was just ten miles away when the Villarrica volcano had a large eruption Tuesday morning.

Johnson's work includes listening to low frequency sounds that volcanoes make. Here’s the low-frequency sound his sensors recorded during this week's eruption; the sound is normally too low for us to hear, so it's been sped up:

Lonnie Hutson

An Idaho artist has immortalized the state’s native fish, in the hopes that his art will encourage people to protect local rivers.

The health of Idaho’s rivers was the catalyst for a new art exhibit of native fish on display at the College of Idaho’s Rosenthal Gallery of Art. Artist Lonnie Hutson lives 25 miles outside of Moscow. When he’s not making art, he’s a river outfitter. He says the two professions are closely linked.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Lions are in trouble and need our help. That’s the message from a lion researcher in Africa and Boise’s own zoo, which together are trying to help lions survive in the wild.

reb / Flickr Creative Commons

Tax identity theft is increasing across the country and Idaho is no exception. The number of cases of people using someone else’s name and social security number to file a false tax return more than quadrupled last year in Idaho.

In 2013, there were 74 cases of tax identity theft. Last year, that number jumped to 352 says Idaho Tax Commission's Doreen Warren.

Courtesy of Frank Aden Jr.

Boise’s skyline has morphed over time, as buildings from early in the last century made way for newer, more modern structures. Those changes were captured in picture postcards and have been published in a new book.

Frank Aden Junior is an amateur Boise historian and a member of the Idaho Historical Society. His interest in Boise history grew out of his hobby of collecting old picture postcards that showed the city from different locations.

Courtesy Robin Rausch

For the fourth-straight year, Meridian chef Rich Brown won the top prize at the Idaho state snow sculpting competition in McCall, creating a 14-foot circus elephant in just three days.

The McCall competition is one of two sculpting contests held at the winter carnival each year. Local businesses host a themed contest, the state competition is later in the week. Brown took part in both and picked up first prize in the state competition.

He and his two teammates chose to sculpt a circus elephant. "It turned out very well," says Brown.

Ryan Wiedmaier / Flickr Creative Commons

A Boise State University professor wants to make it easier to decide whether it's worth it to spend a little more on organic produce, or purchase the cheaper non-organic option.

"Eighty percent of American grocery stores now sell organic food and people have to decide for themselves is this worth it to buy to feed myself and my family?" says Cynthia Curl. "We don't have a lot of guidance to give to those people and so I think it's a really important thing to study."

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

If you’re in a same-sex marriage and you live in Idaho, filing state taxes just got a little simpler.

When the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals legalized gay marriage last year in Idaho, that law change also meant changes at the Idaho Tax Commission and for same-sex couples filing joint tax returns. Now, married same-sex couples will only have to fill out one federal form when they file their taxes, instead of the three that had to be filed under the old rules.

Boise State University

A Boise State professor is looking for clues about Earth's origin by studying planets around distant stars.

Brian Jackson is an assistant professor in Boise State’s Department of Physics. He’s using a $271,000 grant from NASA and data from the Kepler space observatory to study planets that are very close to their host stars.

Samantha Martin

For three weeks this winter, Samantha Martin spent her days inside a freezing-cold house ripping apart the walls, doors, and windows. She was salvaging whatever she could because the house was set for demolition.

Martin and her group Buffalo Heart Homes have been trying for two years to save a group of historic homes in downtown Boise.