Samantha Wright

News Reporter/On-air Host

Samantha Wright is a news reporter and the local host for Boise State Public Radio's All Things Considered on weekday afternoons.

Her spot reporting, special projects, and audio production have been featured on Voice of America, National Public Radio News, This American Life, National Native News, the Northwest Radio Network and on The New York Times website. Samantha earned a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Use of Sound for her feature “Co-op Cooks.”  She also earned a first place award for Use of Sound for her feature “Canning Makes a Comeback” from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Incorporated. Samantha was a co-producer of the Idaho StoryCorps Project. The project was recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Service Dog Series

Feb 5, 2014
service dog, awescar
Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Service Dog: An Idaho Army Veteran Struggles With Post Traumatic Stress

Neil Paprocki

People in Idaho are seeing more raptors because golden eagles and red-tailed hawks aren't flying as far south for winter. That's according to a new study from Boise State University. The study authors say the change in migration habits means fewer of the birds of prey are being spotted in southern states.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Republican gubernatorial candidate Russ Fulcher released his latest campaign finance report Friday. The report shows Fulcher raised $251,642 last year, $100,000 of which he personally loaned to his campaign.

Fulcher is currently a state senator in the Idaho Legislature. He's running against fellow Republican Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter in the May primary.

bread, food, foodbank
Emily Carlin / Flickr Creative Commons

Local musicians and their lyrical Christmas creations brought more than good cheer to Idaho last year.
In December, we told you about a special musical collection aimed at raising money for The Idaho Foodbank. Now, we know  just how much the album raised.

The fourth IdaHo Ho Ho Christmas CD raised enough cash to pay for 23,465 meals for those in need.

Nordic Focus / US Biathlon

Sara Studebaker is a Boise native. She graduated from Boise High School and has been a biathlon competitor since 2003. She represented the U.S. in biathlon during the Vancouver Winter Olympics. Since then, she’s been training hard, ready to take another shot, this time in Sochi, Russia.

SARA STUDEBAKER

Hometown: Boise, ID

Sport: Biathlon

Birthday: Oct. 7, 1984

Stethescope, Health Care, Doctor, Medical
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

A federal judge says a Boise-area hospital violated federal antitrust laws when it purchased Idaho's largest independent physicians' practice.

U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill made the ruling Friday, ordering St. Luke's Health System to undo its buyout of the Nampa-based Saltzer Medical Group.

Nordic Focus / US Biathlon

Idaho native Sara Studebaker is two weeks away from skiing and shooting in her second Olympic Games. Studebaker, a Boise High School graduate, has been competing in the biathlon since 2003. Now, at 29-years-old, Studebaker says she's ready for Sochi.

“The second time, you feel a little more seasoned," Studebaker says. "You feel like you know what’s going on and I think it gives me a great opportunity to have some really good results and hopefully do better than I did in Vancouver. So I’m really excited for the possibilities.”

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A legislative House committee Tuesday approved a rule that will make it more complicated for married same-sex couples in Idaho to file their taxes. It’s a rule designed to try and appease state law, which does not acknowledge same-sex marriage, and the federal Internal Revenue Service, which does. It was a rare chance for gay Idahoans to speak their mind before lawmakers.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A legislative committee Tuesday will hear testimony on a rule that would forbid same-sex couples who are legally married in other states from filing joint Idaho income tax returns.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The 2014 Idaho legislative session started just last week, but there are already people watching the calendar to see when lawmakers will go home. That matters to taxpayers because each day of the session costs roughly $30,000. 

Lawmakers aren't just thinking about the money, but they're gearing up for the primary election this May. 

Joe Jaszewski / Idaho Statesman

Update 3:15 p.m.: The Idaho State Police (ISP) report the westbound lanes of I-84 reopened at about 2:00 p.m. That’s after a 46-car-accident caused a five-hour delay.

An ISP spokesperson says a swerving logging truck caused a chain reaction of accidents. Tow trucks, another logging truck, and a boom had to be brought in to clear vehicles and logs from the road.

Idaho Capitol, statehouse
Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The 2014 Idaho Legislature kicks off Monday with Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter’s annual State of the State speech. 

Lawmakers will look at a variety of issues this year, from the budget to education, all through the lens of primary elections, which come up in May.

Boise State University Political Science professor Gary Moncrief says lawmakers will look closely at a couple of issues: healthcare and education.

Gavel, Courts, Justice
SalFalko / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. District Judge Edward Lodge has halted part of Boise's new anti-panhandling ordinance. The ordinance was set to go into effect Thursday.

Boise approved the ordinance in September to crack down on aggressive panhandling.  The tougher rules make a first offense an infraction when panhandlers seek handouts while someone is crossing a roadway or near a sidewalk cafe. 

For the fourth-straight year Idaho musicians and local coffee chain Moxie Java have teamed up to release a holiday album to raise cash for The Idaho Foodbank.

The aptly-named IdaHo Ho Ho CD features local artists including Curtis Stigers, Ned Evett, and Belinda Bowler.

Steve Stuebner

The Owyhee Canyonlands cover more than 5 million acres of rugged landscape in southern Idaho and eastern Oregon.

Few hikers and campers venture into this desert wilderness because there aren't many trail signs or information.

Steve Stuebner teamed up with photographer Mark Lisk to create a guidebook for the Canyonlands. Their new book, The Owyhee Canyonlands: An Outdoor Adventure Guide, details 55 hiking and biking trails.

Stethescope, Health Care, Doctor, Medical
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

While the number of Idahoans who've signed up for subsidized health plans through the state's insurance exchange increased in November, enrollment hasn't made much of a dent in the number of uninsured people in Idaho.

“The number of individuals who have selected a marketplace plan and are considered enrolled through the process is 1,730 as of November 30,” says insurance exchange director Amy Dowd.

That's a big jump from the 338 people who signed up for a plan in October, the first month the online marketplace was available to consumers.

Courtesy of American Center for Law and Justice

Pastor Saeed Abedini has been the focus of media reports and pleas for help from his family in Boise.  Now Abedini will be the focus of a hearing of a U.S. House Foreign Affairs subcommittee.

Abedini has been a prisoner in Iran since September of 2012 after being accused of forming a network of Christian churches. He's serving an eight year sentence and was recently moved to a notoriously brutal prison in Iran.

snow, tree, weather
Jim Bauer / Flickr Creative Commons

A storm that will bring snow and frigid temperatures, is on its way to Idaho. The snow will come first, blowing into into Oregon this evening and into southern Idaho later Friday night.

"We’re going to get several inches of snow in most of southeast Oregon and in southwest Idaho," says Les Colin, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Boise."The Treasure Valley here will get about one to two inches.”

cat, feline
AlexHubner / Wikimedia Commons

Updated Jan. 10, 2:20 p.m.

The Knitting Factory is sad to report that Lil’ Bub won’t make it to the Boise festival. However, there will be a special appearance by Keyboard Cat and his owner Charlie Schmidt.

telephone, buttons, hotline
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Since the end of October, Idaho's Suicide Prevention hotline has fielded more than 800 calls. Now, the year-old hotline is expanding its hours of operation and may soon receive national accreditation.

The suicide prevention hotline continues to see an upward trend in the number of people calling for support. Currently, volunteers from Idaho answer the phone from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Outside those hours, all calls to 1-800-273-TALK are answered by people out of state.

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