Scott Graf

News Director

Scott comes to BSPR from WFAE in Charlotte, N.C., where he served as local host of NPR’s “Morning Edition” for the past eight years. He began his new position as Morning Edition Host/Senior Editor for BSPR in 2012.

Scott is a multi-award winning host and reporter who was named the North Carolina Journalist of the Year in 2007. He has produced several feature stories for NPR news magazines and he contributes to WBUR's “Only a Game” sports program.

Ways To Connect

Bogus Basin

Bogus Basin will open Friday despite anemic snow accumulation on the mountain north of Boise.

The ski resort plans to open limited terrain to skiers and snowboarders. Bogus reports 13 inches of snow at its base.

"We’re ready and very excited to welcome the community up the mountain to have fun enjoying early-season skiing and boarding,” says Bogus General Manager Alan Moore.

State of Idaho

A pilot project that could change the way Idahoans get treated during a mental health crisis has opened its doors in eastern Idaho. Officials held a ribbon cutting ceremony in Idaho Falls Monday morning.

ITD

The agency that oversees Idaho's highways spent part of Tuesday taking a trip down Memory Lane.

The Idaho Transportation Department opened a time capsule buried in Boise in 1989. The 3-foot piece of conduit had been glued shut and buried near the department's East Annex. The burial was part of a dedication of a grove of trees given to the state by the University of Idaho.

The contents included newspapers of the era, license plates, advertisements and more.

Alexander Baxevanis / Flickr Creative Commons

The internationally-known author Salman Rushdie will speak in Boise Thursday evening during a free event at Boise State University. 

Rushdie’s 1988 book “The Satanic Verses” led to the leader of Iran putting a bounty on the author’s head. Iranian hardliners continue to vow to kill Rushdie.     

In April, the threat prompted police in Ohio to check for bombs in a venue where Rushdie was scheduled to speak.

Jay Breidenbach / National Weather Service

Treasure Valley residents still dealing with the aftermath of last week's record-setting snowfall now have an inversion on their hands, too.

The National Weather Service in Boise says the inversion set up Sunday. Meteorologist Bill Wojcik says it's likely to last through Saturday when winds from a new system disrupt the layering of warm air over cold. He says the inversion - the first of the season - reaches 10,000 feet into the atmosphere.

Bogus Basin, ski
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

This post was updated at 3:15 p.m. Nov. 14:

Those who operate Bogus Basin ski area say they're now "in wait-and-see" mode. Snow totals have been on the low side of forecasters' predictions for the mountain.

General Manager Alan Moore says the ski hill needs three or four more inches of packable snow in order to open a limited number of runs this weekend.

"At this point, without more snow, we're not opening," Moore said Friday afternoon. "And as of right now it's not snowing."

Add The Words
Frankie Barnhill / For Boise State Public Radio

Four Idaho cities have made the latest rankings of a national group that advocates for the rights of lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender people. 

The Washington D.C.-based Human Rights Campaign released its third annual Municipal Equality Index Wednesday. Boise, Idaho Falls, Meridian and Nampa are among the 353 cities ranked. The organization assigns cities a score based on "LGBT inclusion in municipal law and policy." It examines 47 different criteria in six categories.

Idaho National Guard

This story was updated Nov. 7 at 12:00 p.m.

The Idaho National Guard has identified the two soldiers who were killed Thursday near Gowen Field when their Apache helicopter crashed.

Chief Warrant Officer 4 Stien P. Gearheart, 50, and Chief Warrant Officer 4 Jon L. Hartway, 43, were killed when the helicopter they were piloting crashed during night training. Gearheart was from Meridian, Hartway was from Kuna. 

The Guard says both men were part of the 1-183rd Attack Reconnaissance Battalion based in Boise.

A.J. Balukoff, 2014 Election, Democrats
Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Tuesday’s elections revealed two political parties headed in different directions in Idaho.

For the GOP, the sweep of statewide races was a step in healing wounds opened during a contentious summer. But Democrats’ optimism gave way to the stark reality that they continue to struggle for competitiveness in one of the reddest states in the country.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

This post was updated on Nov. 5 at 7:50 a.m.

Idaho Republicans have swept the state's top elected offices and seats in Congress. In addition to Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter being elected to a rare consecutive three-year term, every down-ticket race also went to Otter's Republican colleagues.

Secretary of State

Idaho Public Television

In their last meeting before Tuesday's election, three men running to be Idaho's governor wasted no time in taking shots at each other's policies and ideas. The debate, hosted by Idaho Public Television, featured incumbent Republican Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter, Democrat A.J. Balukoff and Libertarian John Bujak.

UGA College of Ag / Flickr

Idaho dairy producers are touting a new study that again shows the substantial role the dairy industry plays in the state’s economy. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Republican Sherri Ybarra says her at-times bumpy campaign for Idaho's Superintendent of Public Instruction is a result of increased public scrutiny on a political newcomer. But the school administrator from Mountain Home says she understands the focus that's on her comes with a run for public office.

jana jones, education, election 2014
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The Democrat running to be Idaho’s next Superintendent of Public Instruction says funding and low morale are the two biggest issues facing Idaho’s schools.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

As same-sex couples and their supporters gathered at the Ada County Courthouse Wednesday in Boise, a party atmosphere soon took hold as couples would exit the building with marriage licenses in-hand.

The Boise Gay Men's chorus was there to sing. Hundreds of supporters lined the sidewalks in front of the courthouse ready to cheer. There were no protestors.

Here are some sounds from the scene.

David / Flickr Creative Commons

A reporter for the blog covering the Supreme Court, "Scotusblog" says the state of Idaho likely faces an uphill battle in convincing justices that their case against gay marriage is any different than the seven states the court turned away Monday.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

After several weeks of reported prowler sightings on and around the Boise State University campus, officials will host an information session Wednesday for those in the campus community who may be concerned with their safety.

The university announced the forum in an email Tuesday morning. Police again investigated calls early Tuesday regarding suspicious people on and around campus.  A prowler has been reported in women's bedrooms.

Gay marriage, couples, lawsuit
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

This post was updated at 9:16 p.m.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has now given the state of Idaho until 1 p.m. MDT Monday to respond to this evening's motion from the plaintiffs in the case.  The plaintiffs have until 6 p.m. MDT Monday to reply to that response.

The federal government has awarded the Boise Airport $700,000 to help secure direct flights to the eastern U.S.

The airport applied for the Department of Transportation grant over the summer.  A similar application last year was not successful.

U.S. Forest Service

 A slow wildfire season in the U.S. means the Forest Service won’t have to dip into other parts of its budget to cover firefighting expenses. The federal government’s fiscal year ends Tuesday. It’s the first time in three years the agency’s firefighting allotment will cover actual costs.

The Forest Service exceeded its firefighting budget by $505 million last summer, and $440 million the year before.

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