Sheriff's Office Reports 'At Least 14 Victims' In Florida High School Shooting

Feb 14, 2018
Originally published on February 14, 2018 6:05 pm
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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

We're still gathering information about a shooting this afternoon at a high school in South Florida. More than 3,000 students attend Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. It's in South Florida in the city of Parkland. Here's school superintendent Robert Runcie.

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ROBERT RUNCIE: There are numerous fatalities. It's a horrific situation.

SHAPIRO: The Broward sheriff's office says there are 14 victims. We still don't know if that means deaths or injuries or both. The scene is being described as active, though the sheriff's office says a shooter is in custody. Sheriff Scott Israel says that suspect is 18 years old and was not a current student at the school.

We're starting to hear from parents describing the confusion this afternoon. This is Caesar Figueroa, who spoke to us from the high school's parking lot as he waited for his daughter to come out of the building.

CAESAR FIGUEROA: Yeah, my daughter is in 11th grade. Her name is Gabrielle (ph) Figueroa. She was trapped. She was in the closet with her friends. She heard gunshots. She heard a window blow and all the kids running around. And for a half hour, I didn't hear from her at all. So I found this out when she texted me after - about, like, probably 20, 30 minutes later - after. And I saw cops coming like crazy with machine guns and helicopters flying. The FBI is here.

SHAPIRO: And on the line with us now is another parent, Alison Carew, whose twin daughters go to Marjory Stoneman Douglas. Ms. Carew, thank you so much for joining us on what I'm sure...

ALISON CAREW: Hi.

SHAPIRO: ...Has been a terrifying day.

CAREW: Yes.

SHAPIRO: First, I just want to clarify both your daughters are safe.

CAREW: Yes. I have one, and we are just about to get en route to pick up the other one. We're just trying to figure out logistics since a lot of the streets are still blocked.

SHAPIRO: How's she doing?

CAREW: She's - I haven't talked to her in a few minutes. Her phone actually died - but so far so good. The other one home with me now is shaken up and crying, and we're just so thankful that they're both OK. So I just - until I get the other one in my hands, I don't think I'll be able to relax.

SHAPIRO: I understand. How did you learn what was happening today?

CAREW: I was actually sitting at my desk at work. I work in Boca, and they both started texting me independently. They were in different classes. One of them said that she was on lockdown in the auditorium, and one was on lockdown in the front office. And they were both scared and telling me that they love me. And I think that's my daughter actually calling me right now.

SHAPIRO: Well, if you - you need to pick up your daughter.

CAREW: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

SHAPIRO: We will check in with you later in the afternoon.

CAREW: OK, thanks.

SHAPIRO: And get your daughter's phone call, OK. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.