Idaho Matters

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Idaho Matters is the place on-air and online where folks with different views can talk with each other, exchange ideas, debate with respect and come away richer out of the experience. 

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PETERDILLFORGOVERNOR.COM / STOCK / DANNY LAROCHE - FLICKR / BRADLITTLEFORIDAHO.COM

Idaho worst in country for working mothers . . . two more gubernatorial candidates sound off . . . and bicycling in Boise . . . 

ADAM COTTERELL - BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Nearly 60% of Boise's homeless population have outstanding arrest warrants, usually from petty misdemeanors like public drinking or sleeping in the park. These warrants are easily remedied, though they create substantial roadblocks for homeless Idahoans looking to lift themselves up.

OTTO KITSINGER / AP | CREDIT MATT GUILHEM / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Idaho Matters continues with the second in a five-part series presenting a Q&A with Idaho's gubernatorial candidates. Today, we hear Boise State Public Radio's Matt Guilhem speaks with Democratic Boise businessman A.J. Balukoff and BSPR's Samantha Wright talks with retired physician and Republican candidate Tommy Ahlquist.

JESSICA ROBERTS

News media has changed drastically since the beginning of the 2016 presidential election. Fake news, Russian bots, data mining and targeted news have changed the way front-line reporters get their content to consumers. 

ADAM COTTERELL - BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO / BYU BOISE / TOMMY FOR IDAHO / JESSICA ROBERTS

A community court to aid homeless Idahoans . . . student journalists in the 21st century . . . and we hear from two Idaho gubernatorial candidates . . . 

CREDIT MATT GUILHEM / EMILIE RITTER SAUNDERS / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Idaho Matters begins the first in a five-part series presenting a Q&A with Idaho's gubernatorial candidates. We hear Boise State Public Radio's Matt Guilhem speak with Democratic candidate Paulette Jordan, then BSPR's James Dawson speaks with Republican contender Raul Labrador.

Joe Wiegand has been performing as Theodore Roosevelt since 2004; his impersonation is so masterful he has performed at the White House, and has played the 26th president in documentaries. He will be performing in the Treasure Valley next week and he joined Gemma Gaudette in studio to talk about impersonating 'The Hero of San Juan.' 

AMELIA TEMPLETON / OPB

When news broke of the occupation of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Eastern Oregon, documentarian David Byars knew he had to go there with a camera. The result was 'No Man's Land,' a chronicle of the 40-day occupation by public land advocates who saw federal land policies as an infringement on their liberty.

Boise State University president Bob Kustra is retiring after 15 years. He joins Idaho Matters to discuss the growth of the university under his tenure and future plans for both himself and Boise State.

A documentary about the Malheur Ranch Occupation . . . A  pair of Idaho gubernatorial candidates discusses their positions . . . Retiring Boise State President Bob Kustra on his future . . . and a Teddy Roosevelt impressionist visits Treasure Valley.

A panel of reporters joins Gemma Gaudette to discuss this week’s news affecting the Treasure Valley and Idaho.

Twin Falls Mayor Shawn Barigar joined Idaho Matters to talk about the growth and economic development impacting Twin Falls and the Magic Valley.

May the Fourth be with you! Film critic George Prentice discusses the ways Star Wars has crossed generations and become a cultural phenomenon, infiltrating every part of mainstream pop culture.

Idaho Reporters' Roundtable . . . Twin Falls Mayor Shawn Barigar . . . Star Wars in American Culture

Chobani

Chobani has announced that it is offering six weeks of 100 percent paid maternal and paternal leave for its employees. The yogurt manufacturer's Twin Falls plant is the largest of its kind in the world and employs nearly 1,000 Idahoans.

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