2016 Election

Carolyn Kaster / AP

U.S. Representative Raul Labrador spoke to the Idaho House Wednesday about President Donald Trump.

The First District Republican gave a fifteen minute speech to members of Idaho’s House of Representatives. Labrador said he was concerned at the reaction to President Trump’s actions. Labrador said people are acting like Trump’s actions are unusual or illegitimate, when he’s just doing the things he said he would while campaigning.

AP

Demonstrators have gathered outside Idaho's Capitol hours before Republican electors are expected to back President-elect Donald Trump.

Roughly 40 protesters marched, chanted and waved signs Monday, joining similar efforts around the country in a last-ditch attempt to swing electors from voting for Trump. The efforts aren't expected to work in Idaho, nor are they expected to prevent Trump's selection as president.

One Idaho protester stood on the Idaho Capitol steps and read a letter from a Texas elector Christopher Suprun, who vowed not to vote for Trump.

Senate Chamber Idaho Capitol
Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

Idaho’s four Republican presidential electors will cast their Electoral College vote Monday at noon. Elsewhere in the country there's been speculation on so-called faithless electors -- those refusing to cast their vote for their state's electoral winner. But here in Idaho, the concerns were not about who to vote for but who could vote, creating a last-minute scramble to find replacements for two of the four electors.

Idaho Statehouse
Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter and Secretary of State Lawerence Denney say the state's four Republican electors will meet next week to cast their ballots for the president of the United States.

Otter and Denney in a statement Monday say the electors will meet at noon on Dec. 19 in the Governor's Ceremonial Office.

Several of Idaho's electors say they've been flooded with emails, telephone calls and Facebook messages from strangers urging them to reconsider their vote for President-elect Donald Trump.

A 180-million-dollar bond to fund a two-pronged expansion for the College of Western Idaho failed to get the necessary supermajority it needed to pass at the polls Tuesday. The 25-year bond would have gone toward growing CWI’s main campus in Nampa as well as establishing a presence in Boise.

In order to pass, the measure – which would have raised taxes – needed a 67 percent approval rating. Instead, it got 57 percent. The defeat means the college’s trustees now have to consider their next step for the growing institution. 

Two prosecutors who were elected to positions in Boise and Payette County have already resigned from their posts.

Boise County Prosecutor Ross Pittman, who ran unopposed in Tuesday's election, has resigned and has been appointed to a job at the Payette County Prosecutor's office, The Idaho Statesman reported. Payette County Prosecutor Anne-Marie Kelso has also resigned from her position days after winning her re-election bid.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Wednesday afternoon, a group of about 25 protesters gathered on the steps of the Idaho Capitol to show their opposition to president-elect Donald Trump.

Whitnee Kieran held a bright yellow poster, with the message “He is Not My President” written in marker. Kieran says she moved from shock to terror on Election Night, as she watched Donald Trump take the lead.

Ronda Churchill / AP

Election officials said they faced delays tallying the votes in Idaho's second most populated county because of illegible ballots and technical trouble with a voting machine.

The Idaho Press-Tribune reports that the final votes for Canyon County weren't counted until Wednesday morning. Election day polls closed at 8 p.m. on Tuesday.

Tim Hurst, chief deputy at the Secretary of State's office, says Franklin, Bonner and Nez Perce counties also faced troubles counting ballots.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

After a divisive political election, about 100 people gathered at the Idaho Statehouse today to try to come together and find common ground.

The Interfaith Alliance held a service with a Rabbi and an LDS minister, along with Unitarian and Episcopalian members.

Judy Cross is the President of the Board of Directors for Interfaith Alliance of Idaho. She organized the event a few weeks before the election.

Today she said the state needs healing, after such a polarizing election.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The Latest on Election Day in Idaho (all times local):

10:08 a.m.

Idaho voters have approved a Constitutional Amendment that enshrines lawmakers' legislative veto power.

Idaho lawmakers have been using the legislative veto power to reject administrative rules created by executive branch agencies for years.

The practice was approved by the Idaho Supreme Court 25 years ago.

But federal courts have ruled that a similar veto function by Congress was unconstitutional and some states have deemed it illegal.

Brent Moore / Flickr Creative Commons

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said he’ll deport all 11 million undocumented people in the U.S. Lacking legal status, they fill many jobs – especially in farming. With Idaho solidly conservative, we wondered how those in agricultural areas reconciled their business interests with their politics.

Steve Millington is sitting in the back corner of the Twin Falls Perkins restaurant when we meet in the late morning. He’s the chairman of the Twin Falls County Republican Party and an avowed fan of breakfast; he has a plate of eggs, bacon and pancakes while we chat.

Idaho Republican Party / Facebook

Republicans are expected to dominate Tuesday's election, with GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump predicted to easily win Idaho's four electoral votes and all three of the Republican congressional candidates likely to secure their bids for re-election.

That leaves the open seat on Idaho's Supreme Court as the state's most competitive race.

Twin Falls attorney Robyn Brody and Republican state Sen. Curt McKenzie are in a tight race over the little-known position.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Ada County elections officials today will test their voting system in advance of next week's big vote.

The test takes ballots with predetermined votes and runs them through the same process they would go through on Election Day to make sure software and equipment are working properly.

The equipment is tested every election, but Ada County Deputy Chief Clerk Phil McGrane says there’s added scrutiny this year after allegations of voter fraud across the country.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Election Day is next week and all 35 seats in the Idaho Senate and all 70 seats in the Idaho House are on the ballot. That means opportunity for change in the body that makes state policy.

But how much variation will we actually see? And how competitive are this year's races? Those are questions Boise State University Political Science Professor Emeritus Gary Moncrief has been considering. Moncrief says many of the state's legislative races just aren’t that competitive this year.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Elections officials in one Idaho county have found a delicious new way to get out the vote: by bringing "food truck voting" straight to the people.

OK, so it's not a real food truck. You can't get a meal there.

Pages