Abortion

Planned Parenthood of the Northwest

A federal judge has agreed to dismiss a lawsuit challenging two anti-abortion laws in Idaho now that lawmakers have repealed the targeted statutes.

In 2015, the Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands sued the state over two newly enacted bans that prohibited women from receiving abortion-inducing medication through telemedicine. Planned Parenthood argued that the laws placed unnecessary burdens on women seeking safe abortions.

Ada County Statehouse Capitol Building House Chambers Entrance
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho lawmakers advanced a bill that would reverse two anti-abortion laws if passed.

Earlier this year, a federal judge told Idaho lawmakers that he would strike down two anti-abortion laws if they don’t reverse those measures at the state level. In 2015, Idaho passed two laws that banned women from being prescribed abortion-inducing medicine through telemedicine.

www.plannedparenthood.org

Women will no longer be banned from receiving abortion-inducing medication through telemedicine in Idaho under a newly reached agreement.

Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands announced Monday that the lawsuit settlement lifts unnecessary burdens on women seeking safe abortions.

The organization's lawsuit was directed at two laws passed in 2015 that required doctors to be present when administering pregnancy-ending pills.

AP

A new Idaho lawmaker has said he plans to sponsor a bill during the upcoming legislative session that would classify abortion as first-degree murder for mothers and doctors.

Sen. Dan Foreman's abortion bill would exempt mothers and doctors in cases where the mothers' lives are endangered, The Lewiston Tribune reported Wednesday.

"How can a woman tell her unborn child it has to die?" the Moscow Republican asked. "Who represents the child?"

The Stanton Project / Facebook

Planned Parenthood is suing a women's clinic in Idaho over the harassment of Planned Parenthood patients and employees in a parking lot shared by the two organizations.

Scott Thomas / Flickr Creative Commons

The Supreme Court’s decision Monday to strike down a Texas abortion restriction law could have ripple effects in Idaho, where pro-choice advocates are cheering. In a 5-3 ruling, the justices overturned a Texas law requiring surgical facilities in abortion clinics, while also requiring clinic doctors have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Jennifer Pack / Flickr Creative Commons

A Republican lawmaker from eastern Idaho is backing a bill that would require a woman be told where she can get a free ultrasound before undergoing an abortion.

Rep. Ron Nate of Rexburg says the legislation would require the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare to compile a list of providers that offer free ultrasounds for women seeking abortions. The list would be part of the informed consent brochures abortion providers are required to distribute.

Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood has filed a federal lawsuit seeking to overturn two recently passed Idaho laws that ban women from receiving abortion-inducing medication through telemedicine.

Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest in a lawsuit filed Tuesday says that the laws, signed by Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter this year, create an undue burden on women seeking abortions.

The new laws require doctors to be present when administering pregnancy-ending pills. It also requires doctors to make "all reasonable efforts" to schedule a follow-up, but it does not specify how many days later.

Butch Otter
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho had to dip into its bank account Monday to pay for three lawsuits the state has recently lost. The price tag is more than $800,000 dollars.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

An Idaho woman who faced criminal charges for having an abortion won a victory at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Friday.

The federal court found several Idaho restrictions on abortion to be unconstitutional.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals says Idaho's laws restricting abortions after 20 weeks and requiring all second-trimester abortions to take place in a hospital are unconstitutional.

The ruling Friday upholds a judgment made two years ago by U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill.

The case arose after eastern Idaho resident Jennie McCormack was charged with having an illegal abortion. Prosecutors said she obtained an abortion-inducing drug on the Internet and used it to terminate her pregnancy.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Republican Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter has signed legislation that will ban Idaho women from receiving abortion-inducing drugs via telemedicine.

The new law signed on Monday requires a doctor to be physically present when giving pregnancy-ending pills. But telemedicine is not even currently available in the state.

The law also requires doctors to make efforts to schedule a follow-up visit with the woman after administering the drugs.

The Idaho Senate has passed legislation banning women from receiving abortion-inducing medication through telemedicine — an option not available in the state — on a 27-7 party-line vote.

The Senate's seven Democrats opposed the bill Monday, arguing the proposal improperly regulated how doctors should administer care.

Republican Sen. Sheryl Nuxoll from Cottonwood countered that the bill protects women against so-called "webcam abortions," because rarely medical abortions result in surgery.

Idaho lawmakers are set to tackle some of the most contentious issues of the session at the capitol. Monday morning starts with a hearing on abortion.

A bill that would ban doctors from prescribing abortion-inducing medication through telemedicine has passed in the Idaho House on a party-line vote.

House lawmakers voted 55-14 on Monday.

Supporters of the bill argued that the legislation will better protect women's health. Others pointed out that they hoped the bill would limit the number of abortions that occur in the future.

House Democrats countered that the bill inappropriately allowed the Idaho Legislature to regulate medicine rather than physicians.

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