Ammon Bundy

GOP congressman and gubernatorial candidate Raul Labrador says four Idaho residents involved in the 2014 Bunkerville Stand Off in Nevada are facing “a miscarriage of justice.”

John Locher / Associated Press

The first of three trials in the case of Nevada Rancher Cliven Bundy has gone to the jury. The six defendants include four from Idaho.

Testimony has been going on for two months. The six defendants, from Idaho, Arizona and Oklahoma, are accused of a variety of charges, including conspiracy and assault on a federal agent. They are accused of using guns as they stopped federal agents from rounding up Cliven Bundy’s cattle in 2014. States’ rights supporters say this is really a case about federal control of public land in the West.

Rick Bowmer / AP

Jury selection begins Tuesday in the second trial involving people who took part in last winter's armed takeover of a wildlife refuge in southeastern Oregon.

Jurors last fall acquitted occupation leader Ammon Bundy and six others who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to protest the federal control of Western lands and the imprisonment of two ranchers convicted of setting fires.

Amelia Templeton / OPB

As we approach the anniversary of the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, some of the people involved still face charges.

It was Monday January 2, 2016 when an armed group of protestors took over the refuge. Led by Ammon and Ryan Bundy, the occupiers were protesting the jailing of two ranchers and wanted the government to turn over public lands to local control.

AP

Federal prosecutors want a judge in Nevada to schedule a trio of trials for the 17 defendants jailed on charges stemming from an armed confrontation in April 2014 with U.S. officials over grazing rights near cattleman Cliven Bundy's ranch.

But Bundy and his attorney call in documents filed Wednesday for all the defendants to be tried together.

Otherwise, the defendants who are required to wait will spend more months behind bars without a chance to prove their innocence, Bundy attorney Bret Whipple said in the request to Chief U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro.

In a turnaround, the face of the occupation at a national wildlife refuge denied leading the standoff over federal control of public lands and defended receiving a government loan to help his business.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Ethan Knight pressed Ammon Bundy on his claim that he wasn't the leader, pointing to earlier testimony in which he said he was "sort of" in charge.

Bundy told Knight he teaches correct principles and lets people govern themselves.