Anne Frank Memorial

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

In the first part of our Legacy Of Hate series, we took you to north Idaho to look at the history of the Aryan Nations and the effects that still ripple through that community. The compound made north Idaho infamous, but statistics show that year after year, it’s Boise that has topped the list for the number of hate crimes — despite conventional wisdom. It turns out southern Idaho, too, has an unfavorable history that persists into the present.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

In August, a poster surfaced online advertising that Hammerfest would go down on September 30th in Boise. The event is sponsored by the Hammerskins, a white supremacist group that started in Dallas in the late 1980s. The white power themed concerts have taken place around the country and even in Budapest.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

The recent vandalism at the Idaho Anne Frank Memorial triggered a direct response in the form of a performance called Letters From Anne and Martin, which will be taking place Wednesday evening.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

The Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial in Boise has been the target of a series of racist and anti-Semitic vandalism.

The first slurs were found Tuesday morning. Shortly after, Boise Parks and Recreation went to work removing and covering up the language scrawled on the marble.

Wednesday morning, a swastika was discovered on a tablet listing the donors to the memorial. It was drawn in permanent marker next to the name “Wood River Jewish Community.”

Frankie Barnhill / for Boise State Public Radio

It’s hard not to be struck by how happy and normal the Frank family seems in the photos taken before they went into hiding in 1942 during World War II. There’s a black and white photo of Anne with her older sister Margot on the beach, another with all four of her family members dressed up and smiling in a courtyard.  

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

About 100 people gathered at the Anne Frank Memorial Park in Boise Wednesday afternoon to remember this day 50 years ago when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous “I have a Dream” speech.

One of the Boiseans who attended the historic March on Washington in 1963 was Yvonne McCoy. McCoy grew up in Virginia, and was 15 at the time. She says that even as a young girl, she was involved with the civil rights movement.