courtesy Caldwell Fine Arts

Eleven Tibetan Monks will be spending this week in Caldwell at the invitation of the College of Idaho and the nonprofit Caldwell Fine Arts. These monks are from a monastery in India that has a satellite campus of sorts in Georgia. The monastery’s founders fled Tibet after the Chinese government took over the area in the 1950s and its monks follow the Dalai Lama.

Every once in a while, you come across individuals who make you feel better just for having encountered them. As David Brooks, puts it, “They seem deeply good. They listen well. They make you feel funny and valued. They are not thinking about what wonderful work they are doing. They are not thinking about themselves at all.”

Boise City Department of Arts and History

The City of Boise has allotted its largest amount ever to local artists through its annual grant program. The arts and history department announced Monday the 33 arts organizations and individuals will receive a total of $200,000.

The annual grant fund comes from the city’s general fund and has grown rapidly over the last few years. Since the grant program began 20 years ago, the city has awarded more than $1 million to artists and art groups. 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Off a long dirt road about three-and-a-half hours northeast of Boise, the old mining town of Atlanta, Idaho rests on the edge of the Sawtooth Mountains.

Next week, a group of artists of all skill levels will head to Atlanta to unplug from digital life and get inspired. The Atlanta School is a week-long set of workshops, founded by Boiseans Amy O'Brien and Rachel Reichert.

To O’Brien, the remoteness of it all is what makes The Atlanta School so special.

Angie Smith

Los Angeles-based photographer Angie Smith first became curious about Idaho’s refugee population five years ago during visits with her family in Boise.

“I wondered why are they coming to Idaho," says Smith, "how do they get here, what are their lives like once they have arrived and are in the resettlement process. I just had a lot of questions.”

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

With this year’s fifth Treefort Music Fest came the third installment of Storyfort, a mini fort whose main focus is the literary arts scene in Boise.

Founder Christian Winn, a local writer and adjunct professor at Boise State, says the main idea behind Storyfort is to bring great narrative in a variety of compelling genres to the crowds already gathered and coming out for Treefort.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho Commission on the Arts (ICA) turns 50 this year. The organization, which is funded equally by state and federal funds, has a lot planned for its future. They're celebrating their big year with an arts-fueled social media campaign they're asking the public to take part in. (For more info on Art Sparks! Day, click here.)


Screenshot / Wild Lens Vimeo

A new film festival to celebrate the conservation community in Idaho and around the globe will be held Saturday night in Boise. The goal is to inspire viewers to get outside and help the land.

A film from a high school student in Victor, Idaho and a local film about ranchers making room for sage grouse are just some of the stories in the Les Bois Film Festival. Viewers will also see conservation films from Borneo and Singapore.

Rich Brown

One of the signature events of the annual McCall Winter Carnival is the giant images carved in blocks of snow. But many people don’t know that the Carnival hosts two separate snow sculpting competitions. One is sponsored by local businesses and teams can use power tools and chicken wire to build their masterpieces.

Boise Hive

The Boise Hive is at a crossroads.

The nonprofit arts organization has until October 9th to raise $75,000. The Hive serves artists and musicians in need of mental health resources. The organization needs the money for a down payment to buy the building they currently rent, which has received an offer from another buyer.  


In the dance world, tap is a quintessentially American form. And for dancer Andrew Nemr, it’s also a great way to tell stories.

The tap dancer recently traveled from New York to Garden City for a month-long stay at Surel’s Place. The residency is open to all kinds of artists, but Nemr is the first tap dancer to get a respite at the space.

After an interview this week at KBSX studios, the tap dancer gave Boise State Public Radio staff a short performance.


Boise-based musician Trevor Powers, better known in the music world by the stage name Youth Lagoon, is gearing up to release his third album, “Savage Hills Ballroom.” The new album is said to address breaking down barriers and acknowledging personal flaws.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A visiting Boise State professor has spent this week trying to get Idaho children to connect with refugee children.

The “Quilting to Speak” workshop is the brainchild of Reshmi Mukherjee. She’s a visiting professor at Boise State, and is teaching a course this summer about communication between refugees and non-refugees.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

There’s an increasing number of musicians, visual artists and artisans who have chosen to set up shop in Garden City. Many of these artists are from Boise or other parts of the Treasure Valley. The trend has been led by a few visionaries who recognize two things about the town: the cheap real estate, and plenty of space to practice their passion.

Two Boise State University professors have received a $15,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to study the relationship between three western universities and their local arts scenes.

Kevin Martini-Fuller /

Much to the lament of his many fans, cowboy poet Baxter Black is taking a break from the stage. Black has been entertaining audiences for more than 25 years, traveling all over the country, including Idaho. One of his last stage shows will be this Saturday in Sun Valley.

Leslie Durham, Amanda Ashley / Boise State University

A study released this week shows Boise has a vibrant cultural scene, but points to gaps in artistic opportunities, especially among emerging artists.

The comprehensive study from Boise State University professors surveyed more than 500 artists from a variety of disciplines. Visual artists, designers, musicians, dancers, writers, filmmakers and theater artists were all included.

Tyler Garcia / Treefort Music Fest

When Boise's fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest gets underway Wednesday, around 200 writers, bloggers and reporters will be covering the event. 

Kymm Cornelison is the festival’s publicity director.  She says music news outlets from places like Portland, Seattle, Denver, San Francisco and Los Angeles are among those represented.   

More media will cover Treefort in 2015 than ever before. The number of credentials has doubled since the festival's first year. As coverage has grown, so has the festival. 

Jeremy Conant / Treefort Music Fest

Yeah we know, 13 may seem like a pretty random number, but might as well choose a traditionally lucky number out of the dizzying 430 bands scheduled to play the fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest in Boise Wednesday through Sunday.

Clearly, the indie music fest has really owned the "go big or go home" ideal this year.

Courtesy: The Cabin

Boise's annual Treefort Music Fest isn't just about up-and-coming bands, there are "forts" for techies, beer enthusiasts, and yogis. Plus there's a fort for people who love words and stories.

Treefort kicks off this week and this will be the second year of Storyfort.