Arts & Culture

Peter Lovera / Treefort Music Fest

Get your headphones ready, Treeforters.

The first bunch of bands set to play Boise's sixth-annual Treefort Music Fest is here, and features a mix of well-established and emerging bands.

Joan Marcus / Beautiful - The Carole King Musical

Idahoans have an affinity for singer/songwriter Carole King. She owned a ranch in Stanley for more than 30 years and spent much of her time in the Gem State. But she’s not originally from Idaho, as audiences found out in a musical that’s been burning up stages from Broadway to London. The touring company of “Beautiful,” the Carole King story, is in Boise this week.

Pappy Ace / Facebook

An obscure yet fascinating museum in Idaho is looking for a new home and, perhaps, a sponsor.

The Coeur d'Alene Press reports that Richard Le Francis runs the Pappy Boyington Veterans Museum in Hayden with a couple colleagues. Boyington was a World War II flying ace and Medal of Honor winner who was born in Coeur d'Alene.

Arts Saginaw Facebook Site

In September, we told you the story of traveling Idaho artist Ken Newman and his wife Debbie, who tour the country each year, showcasing Ken’s art. When last we left them, the Newmans were in Grand Rapids, Michigan at ArtPrize8 with the bronze sculpture titled “The Last Whistle.”

Jodi Eichelberger / Surel's Place

Garden City hasn’t always been known for its artistic residents. But over the last 10 years, a growing number of creative types have set up shop there.

Surel’s Place is the focal point of the city's Live-Work-Create District. The multipurpose space, which hosts an artist in residency program, is named after Surel Mitchell. The painter lived in the house until her death in 2011.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The day before his new exhibit opening in downtown Boise, Giuseppe Licari takes a break from building his installation. Licari sits in the courtyard behind Ming Studios sipping an espresso as he takes a puff of his cigarette. As it turns out, the Sicilian-born artist is kind of obsessed with smoke – and what it means for a landscape. 

Diane Simmons

A new book chronicles the bizarre true story of a Boise woman who became the victim of a bigamist who traveled around the West after World War II. The man, it seems, had a penchant for marrying, and then leaving, young women.

NPR

You hear Paula Poundstone most weekends on NPR’s "Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me" on KBSX 91.5 FM.

Throughout her nearly 40 year career, she’s been an author, late night TV personality, and actress. Ahead of her appearance in Boise Saturday night, Matt Guilhem spoke to Poundstone about her lengthy career, getting her start and Idaho. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

EDITOR'S NOTE:  Boise State Public Radio is bidding farewell to a familiar voice. ​Adam Cotterell has been a reporter on our airwaves for nine years. But starting next week, he will become a stay-at-home dad instead. (He's not leaving the radio station entirely. He'll work as a part-time podcaster on a special project set to debut in February.) For his last daily reporting assignment, we asked Adam to tell us about stay-at-home fatherhood in Idaho. 

Copyright James Castle Collection and Archive, L.P.

The City of Boise is working to preserve the property where Idaho artist James Castle lived and worked.

Castle is known worldwide for his drawings, many of which he created in Boise from the 1930s until his death in 1977. He was deaf and used his homegrown art to communicate.

courtesy Caldwell Fine Arts

Eleven Tibetan Monks will be spending this week in Caldwell at the invitation of the College of Idaho and the nonprofit Caldwell Fine Arts. These monks are from a monastery in India that has a satellite campus of sorts in Georgia. The monastery’s founders fled Tibet after the Chinese government took over the area in the 1950s and its monks follow the Dalai Lama.

Deb Newman

An Idaho artist, who spends much of the year in an RV showing his work, is vying for a $200,000 dollar award in a competition in Michigan.

Ken Newman, his wife Debbie and their dog leave the town of Cambridge every year to travel the U.S. showing off Ken’s art. While on the road, they attend art shows and venues, and Ken spends time creating new works in bronze and wood.

For the last 17 years, the Newman’s have been on the road.

Marcel Pacatte

Pop quiz: What do a pig puppet named Hamlet (Get it?) and about a dozen Boise elementary school students have in common?

You wouldn’t be incorrect if you ventured that all are adorable, but the answer we’re looking for is a little more specific: All performed on Saturday in proximity to a 400-year-old book that you can see in Boise for just one more day, Wednesday.  

Boise City Department of Arts and History

The City of Boise has allotted its largest amount ever to local artists through its annual grant program. The arts and history department announced Monday the 33 arts organizations and individuals will receive a total of $200,000.

The annual grant fund comes from the city’s general fund and has grown rapidly over the last few years. Since the grant program began 20 years ago, the city has awarded more than $1 million to artists and art groups. 

Boise Hive

A Boise nonprofit got a makeover and is ready to share its updated building with the community. The Boise Hive is celebrating its updated space with an open house Thursday from 5-9 p.m.

The Hive opened its doors on the Bench two years ago. The nonprofit serves musicians, offering rehearsal and recording space – but also mental health counseling for those struggling with issues like depression and anxiety.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Barbara Perry Bauer likes to use the line from the movie The Sixth Sense, “I see dead people.” But she doesn’t mean it literally. This local historian is obsessed with the people and places that shaped Boise. Lately, she’s been seeing a lot of ghosts of groceries past in the North End neighborhood.

Marcel Pacatte / Boise State Public Radio

The first collection of Shakespeare's plays, printed nearly 400 years ago, is in Boise for three more weeks, and on Thursday night the world's foremost Shakespeare scholar delivered the keynote speech of the celebration surrounding the famed First Folio's stop here.

Today, we revere them. So much so, in fact, that they're worth millions. One was purchased for just under $6 million, another for just over. Some are secured in vaults. One had to be sold because its owner couldn't afford the insurance.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Dave Eggar is one of those rare musicians who is equally at home in a large classical concert hall, on stage accompanying top 40 pop artists, and at a jam session with tribal musicians in the Philippines. He’s played at Carnegie Hall and has made pop music with artists like Coldplay, Beyonce and the late Amy Winehouse. 

The New York City-based musician has made it to the top of his field by stretching the boundaries of what it means to be a classically-trained cellist. 

 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

 

A rare copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio is in Boise for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. This 400-year-old book is the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays. It has immense historical significance and is sought-after by collectors. Copies can sell for millions of dollars. Boise State has gone to great lengths to create a memorable experience and ensure the book’s safety.

Wiki Media Commons

A valuable, rare book is coming to Idaho for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. is doing a national tour of the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays, known as the First Folio. The university expects thousands of people to come and see this 400-year-old book.

To explain why this book is considered so important, George Prentice talked with reporter and the KBSX newsroom’s resident Shakespeare enthusiast Adam Cotterell.

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