Arts & Culture

courtesy Caldwell Fine Arts

Eleven Tibetan Monks will be spending this week in Caldwell at the invitation of the College of Idaho and the nonprofit Caldwell Fine Arts. These monks are from a monastery in India that has a satellite campus of sorts in Georgia. The monastery’s founders fled Tibet after the Chinese government took over the area in the 1950s and its monks follow the Dalai Lama.

Deb Newman

An Idaho artist, who spends much of the year in an RV showing his work, is vying for a $200,000 dollar award in a competition in Michigan.

Ken Newman, his wife Debbie and their dog leave the town of Cambridge every year to travel the U.S. showing off Ken’s art. While on the road, they attend art shows and venues, and Ken spends time creating new works in bronze and wood.

For the last 17 years, the Newman’s have been on the road.

Marcel Pacatte

Pop quiz: What do a pig puppet named Hamlet (Get it?) and about a dozen Boise elementary school students have in common?

You wouldn’t be incorrect if you ventured that all are adorable, but the answer we’re looking for is a little more specific: All performed on Saturday in proximity to a 400-year-old book that you can see in Boise for just one more day, Wednesday.  

Boise City Department of Arts and History

The City of Boise has allotted its largest amount ever to local artists through its annual grant program. The arts and history department announced Monday the 33 arts organizations and individuals will receive a total of $200,000.

The annual grant fund comes from the city’s general fund and has grown rapidly over the last few years. Since the grant program began 20 years ago, the city has awarded more than $1 million to artists and art groups. 

Boise Hive

A Boise nonprofit got a makeover and is ready to share its updated building with the community. The Boise Hive is celebrating its updated space with an open house Thursday from 5-9 p.m.

The Hive opened its doors on the Bench two years ago. The nonprofit serves musicians, offering rehearsal and recording space – but also mental health counseling for those struggling with issues like depression and anxiety.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Barbara Perry Bauer likes to use the line from the movie The Sixth Sense, “I see dead people.” But she doesn’t mean it literally. This local historian is obsessed with the people and places that shaped Boise. Lately, she’s been seeing a lot of ghosts of groceries past in the North End neighborhood.

Marcel Pacatte / Boise State Public Radio

The first collection of Shakespeare's plays, printed nearly 400 years ago, is in Boise for three more weeks, and on Thursday night the world's foremost Shakespeare scholar delivered the keynote speech of the celebration surrounding the famed First Folio's stop here.

Today, we revere them. So much so, in fact, that they're worth millions. One was purchased for just under $6 million, another for just over. Some are secured in vaults. One had to be sold because its owner couldn't afford the insurance.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Dave Eggar is one of those rare musicians who is equally at home in a large classical concert hall, on stage accompanying top 40 pop artists, and at a jam session with tribal musicians in the Philippines. He’s played at Carnegie Hall and has made pop music with artists like Coldplay, Beyonce and the late Amy Winehouse. 

The New York City-based musician has made it to the top of his field by stretching the boundaries of what it means to be a classically-trained cellist. 

 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

 

A rare copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio is in Boise for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. This 400-year-old book is the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays. It has immense historical significance and is sought-after by collectors. Copies can sell for millions of dollars. Boise State has gone to great lengths to create a memorable experience and ensure the book’s safety.

Wiki Media Commons

A valuable, rare book is coming to Idaho for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. is doing a national tour of the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays, known as the First Folio. The university expects thousands of people to come and see this 400-year-old book.

To explain why this book is considered so important, George Prentice talked with reporter and the KBSX newsroom’s resident Shakespeare enthusiast Adam Cotterell.

The City Club of Boise is hosting a civility summit July 31 through August 2. It’s part of City Club’s yearlong focus on promoting civil, public discourse.

Boise State Public Radio

The popular augmented reality game Pokemon Go has gotten Boise players out and about in the downtown as they play from their smartphones. According to the Idaho Statesman, there has been an influx of business at some shops, including pizza-by-the-slice vendors Pie Hole.

screengrab YouTube.com

Update 7/11/16: The filmaker who captured the wild abandon of the Crouch Fourth of July celebration is not pleased with the version posted by the New York Post. Adam Nawrot calls the Post's shorter, music-enhanced video "disgusting."

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Off a long dirt road about three-and-a-half hours northeast of Boise, the old mining town of Atlanta, Idaho rests on the edge of the Sawtooth Mountains.

Next week, a group of artists of all skill levels will head to Atlanta to unplug from digital life and get inspired. The Atlanta School is a week-long set of workshops, founded by Boiseans Amy O'Brien and Rachel Reichert.

To O’Brien, the remoteness of it all is what makes The Atlanta School so special.

screengrab / Refinery29

This year's Treefort Music Fest may seem like a distant memory already, but luckily you can relive some of the magic with a new video from New York-based fashion and culture website Refinery29. The online zine interviewed Spanish rockers Hinds during their visit to Boise this March.

courtesy Kristen Tracy

Author Kristen Tracy is coming to Idaho to promote her newest book, Project Unpopular. She’ll be doing a presentation at Boise’s Rediscovered Books June 16 at 7:00 pm. Talking about the book in the state is appropriate since, like many of the California-based writer's works, it is set in Idaho.  

Karen Day

A new “commercial hybrid” film takes viewers on a visual journey of Idaho, covering hundreds of miles of landscape and history. “Destination Idaho” will be shown for free Tuesday night in Boise.

Idaho filmmaker Karen Day says her 65 minute travelogue took her all over the state, from Boise to Wallace to Priest Lake.

She funded the film with public and private partners, from Shore Lodge to the National Park Service, to the Boise Convention and Visitors Bureau. Her plan was to use history and visuals to inspire people to visit the Gem State.

Mary Hallock Foote

It was an Idaho controversy more than one hundred years in the making. And one playwright is bringing the story to the stage Saturday in Boise.

The story begins in the 1880’s. Mary Hallock Foote lived in Boise with her husband as he tried to build a canal system. She later wrote about her time in Idaho and the West in letters and prose. Almost 100 years later, a famous author used her words and her story, without giving her any recognition. That sparked a controversy over what constitutes plagiarism that lingers to this day.

Jeff Turner / Flickr Creative Commons

Fire trucks with red, white and blue bunting, kids on their parents' shoulders waving little flags: what’s more emblematic of American patriotism than a Fourth of July parade? Now the volunteer group that has organized Boise’s parade for the last 20 years is concerned about paying for it in the future.

1905 photo courtesy of the Idaho State Archives & Library

A group of dedicated historians and preservationists are working to educate people and protect downtown Boise’s historic architecture, one weekend at a time.

The non-profit group Preservation Idaho has started up weekly tours of the city, called WalkAbout Boise.

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