Arts & Culture

The City Club of Boise is hosting a civility summit July 31 through August 2. It’s part of City Club’s yearlong focus on promoting civil, public discourse. Early this year the City Club partnered with the National Institute for Civil Discourse to give Idaho lawmakers a training on how to have political and policy discussions in which people can disagree respectfully. Bill Manny is past president of the City Club and an editor with the Idaho Statesman. He says the lawmakers pointed out that...

Boise State Public Radio

The popular augmented reality game Pokemon Go has gotten Boise players out and about in the downtown as they play from their smartphones. According to the Idaho Statesman, there has been an influx of business at some shops, including pizza-by-the-slice vendors Pie Hole. “We’ve definitely seen an increase in our business, especially late at night,” said Logan Finch, assistant supervisor at Pie Hole and a member of Pokemon Go Team Valor. “It’s getting people out of the house. It’s actually...

screengrab YouTube.com

Update 7/11/16: The filmaker who captured the wild abandon of the Crouch Fourth of July celebration is not pleased with the version posted by the New York Post. Adam Nawrot calls the Post's shorter, music-enhanced video "disgusting." "I think the NYP put a weird spin on everything," Nawrot says. "My video was intended to be very 'fly on the wall' with as little editing choices or signs of my hand as possible. The music and clickbait style rhetoric added by the Post doesn't jive with my...

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Off a long dirt road about three-and-a-half hours northeast of Boise, the old mining town of Atlanta, Idaho rests on the edge of the Sawtooth Mountains. Next week, a group of artists of all skill levels will head to Atlanta to unplug from digital life and get inspired. The Atlanta School is a week-long set of workshops, founded by Boiseans Amy O'Brien and Rachel Reichert.

To O’Brien, the remoteness of it all is what makes The Atlanta School so special. “I think it’s so rare,"...

screengrab / Refinery29

This year's Treefort Music Fest may seem like a distant memory already, but luckily you can relive some of the magic with a new video from New York-based fashion and culture website Refinery29 . The online zine interviewed Spanish rockers Hinds during their visit to Boise this March. The all-female band was one of the most talked about groups to play the indie festival, and their infectious energy and feminist prowess got people moving at each of their three performances. But Hinds has faced...

courtesy Kristen Tracy

Author Kristen Tracy is coming to Idaho to promote her newest book, Project Unpopular . She’ll be doing a presentation at Boise’s Rediscovered Books June 16 at 7:00 pm. Talking about the book in the state is appropriate since, like many of the California-based writer's works, it is set in Idaho. Tracy is an award-winning writer of books for teens and kids. Her work has received rave reviews from places like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly, as well as from publications specifically about books...

Karen Day

A new “commercial hybrid” film takes viewers on a visual journey of Idaho, covering hundreds of miles of landscape and history. “Destination Idaho” will be shown for free Tuesday night in Boise. Idaho filmmaker Karen Day says her 65 minute travelogue took her all over the state, from Boise to Wallace to Priest Lake. She funded the film with public and private partners, from Shore Lodge to the National Park Service, to the Boise Convention and Visitors Bureau. Her plan was to use history and...

Mary Hallock Foote

It was an Idaho controversy more than one hundred years in the making. And one playwright is bringing the story to the stage Saturday in Boise. The story begins in the 1880’s. Mary Hallock Foote lived in Boise with her husband as he tried to build a canal system. She later wrote about her time in Idaho and the West in letters and prose. Almost 100 years later, a famous author used her words and her story, without giving her any recognition. That sparked a controversy over what constitutes...

Jeff Turner / Flickr Creative Commons

Fire trucks with red, white and blue bunting, kids on their parents' shoulders waving little flags: what’s more emblematic of American patriotism than a Fourth of July parade? Now the volunteer group that has organized Boise’s parade for the last 20 years is concerned about paying for it in the future. Jacob Barrett with the We The People 4 th of July Celebration Committee says a new rule last year from the Ada County Highway District required them to hire a contractor for traffic control...

1905 photo courtesy of the Idaho State Archives & Library

A group of dedicated historians and preservationists are working to educate people and protect downtown Boise’s historic architecture, one weekend at a time. The non-profit group Preservation Idaho has started up weekly tours of the city, called WalkAbout Boise . Preservation Idaho has been around since 1972. It started as “The Friends of Old Buildings.” For the past 12 years, they've run architecture walks around the city, giving a tour of a specific neighborhood. The desire for more...

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Two days after the official holiday (which celebrates the 1862 Mexican victory over French invaders) the town of Wilder, Idaho came together for their first annual Cinco de Mayo party. The agricultural town in Canyon County is largely Latino; last year the town became the first in the state to elect an all-Latino city council . Dancers in bright dresses took the stage, and a mariachi band and "low-ride" cars were on display. The afternoon also included a display of Mexican "dancing horses,"...

Erin Pass / Flickr Creative Commons

After nine years, a beloved arts event in downtown Boise is coming to an end. Modern Art (which takes over the Modern Hotel Thursday evening for the last time) began at the height of the Great Recession. Now, the hotel staff says it’s time to retire the event – but not without one big final party. In 2008, the Modern Hotel opened some of its rooms to local artists for one night in May. The idea was to give artists a new venue to display or perform their work, allowing them to transform their...

Angie Smith

Los Angeles-based photographer Angie Smith first became curious about Idaho’s refugee population five years ago during visits with her family in Boise. “I wondered why are they coming to Idaho," says Smith, "how do they get here, what are their lives like once they have arrived and are in the resettlement process. I just had a lot of questions.”
Smith has been photographing and interviewing refugees for more than a year, funded by a grant from Boise’s arts and history department. Before...

Screengrab ted.com

Pocatello has begun the process of redesigning its city flag. But, the reason for that redesign is a bit unusual. It begins with a TED Talk . The public speaking events known as TED Talks are so popular they even have their own NPR show. (Saturdays at 3:00 on KBSX 91.5.) And it was a TED talk by a public radio host/podcaster that shamed Pocatello into changing its flag. San Francisco-based Roman Mars talks about design on his show “99% Invisible.” Just over a year ago Mars gave a TED Talk...

Justin Doering / Fifty Sandwiches blog

Recent Boise State University media studies graduate Justin Doering has set out on a unique cross-country journey. Through a blog he's calling "Fifty Sandwiches," Doering has set out to interview people experiencing homelessness. The blogger says the idea is to " close the gap between perception and reality" when it comes to what homeless individuals experience. "I will be traveling city to city, offering to take homeless people out for a casual lunch in exchange for an interview. The...

Sarah Conwell / facebook.com/thefuturesoon

You may know Jonathan Coulton for his humorous, often nerd-culture themed songs. Or maybe you know him as the co-host of NPR’s Ask Me Another. But Coulton is also the inspiration for a new musical that premiered Friday night in Boise. Computer programmer turned musician Coulton is a rock star to geeks and nerds. That’s why computer programmer / musical theater director / Idaho resident Gregg Irwin and fellow techie Eric Shuss created The Future Soon . It’s a musical written around more than a...

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The TED organization has a large and loyal following for its live speaking events and millions of people watch the talks online. In recent years, locally organized TEDx events have been produced around the country. Saturday TEDx Boise returns for its second year. All afternoon and into the evening notable Idaho residents will give talks on stage at the Egyptian Theater. This year’s theme is “reframing radical.” We asked three of this year’s speakers how they want to do that. The body image...

Boise Escape / Facebook

People do a lot of unusual things in their leisure time. That includes - and this is not an April Fool’s joke – paying to be locked in rooms so they can struggle for an hour to get out. In fact, escape room games are an international sensation and Boise is no exception. Five members of the KBSX team went to find out what Boise Escape is all about. Now you can hear what it’s like behind the scenes of an escape room business. And you can listen to the struggles and eventual triumph as a...

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

With this year’s fifth Treefort Music Fest came the third installment of Storyfort, a mini fort whose main focus is the literary arts scene in Boise. Founder Christian Winn, a local writer and adjunct professor at Boise State, says the main idea behind Storyfort is to bring great narrative in a variety of compelling genres to the crowds already gathered and coming out for Treefort. Attending the readings and panels, however, it’s hard not to notice the other kinds of crowds Storyfort draws:...

Alex Hecht / Treefort Music Fest

Despite some cold nights and cloudy days, thousands of people attended the fifth annual Treefort Music Fest. Festival director Eric Gilbert says organizers have learned from past mistakes to make the event easier to navigate and enjoy. “Attendance is definitely up but our lines have been better," he says. "I feel like we’ve spread the lineup out a lot better, so it made harder choices for folks but that also led to a better line experience.”
Gilbert says it will take a while to settle...

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