Arts & Culture

Boise Escape / Facebook

People do a lot of unusual things in their leisure time. That includes - and this is not an April Fool’s joke – paying to be locked in rooms so they can struggle for an hour to get out. In fact, escape room games are an international sensation and Boise is no exception.

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

With this year’s fifth Treefort Music Fest came the third installment of Storyfort, a mini fort whose main focus is the literary arts scene in Boise.

Founder Christian Winn, a local writer and adjunct professor at Boise State, says the main idea behind Storyfort is to bring great narrative in a variety of compelling genres to the crowds already gathered and coming out for Treefort.

Alex Hecht / Treefort Music Fest

Despite some cold nights and cloudy days, thousands of people attended the fifth annual Treefort Music Fest. Festival director Eric Gilbert says organizers have learned from past mistakes to make the event easier to navigate and enjoy.

“Attendance is definitely up but our lines have been better," he says. "I feel like we’ve spread the lineup out a lot better, so it made harder choices for folks but that also led to a better line experience.”

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

James Lloyd draws castles and woodsy creatures for a living.

The 32-year-old illustrator moved to Boise from Eastern Idaho in 2011. Hungry for work, he put an ad on Craigslist. Pretty soon after, somebody reached out to him asking if he could make some posters for a small weekend music festival planned for the spring of 2012. Lloyd said yes -- and quickly found himself working on posters, t-shirts, a website and print ads for a festival that had grown to almost 140 bands. Treefort Music Fest was born.

Rase Littlefield / Treefort Music Fest

Today is the first day of Boise's Treefort Music Fest. The five-year-old festival has become the heart of the indie arts and culture scene in Boise, showcasing talent from different genres – including writing and the culinary arts. Reporter Frankie Barnhill talked with Morning Edition host Dan Greenwood about this year's festival, which runs through Sunday.

The Treefort Music Festival is preparing for what will likely be its biggest year since it began in 2012. And as it grows, new elements of the festival continue to emerge.  This year attendees will see another branch of the festival with a focus on food issues.  Tara Morgan is one of the organizers of Foodfort. She says that aspect of the festival will feature two components.

“For the taste component we have 10 local chefs that are utilizing mostly local ingredients to create small plates, and then talks which is a series of panels and discussions related to food,” Morgan said.

Francis Delapena / Treefort Music Fest

Happy #Treefort2016, intrepid music voyagers.

 

Michael Smith / Treefort Music Fest

Of the 450 bands that will perform at Treefort Music Fest this week (March 23-27), 25 are international acts. That is the largest number of bands from across the pond to play at five-year-old festival. 

According to festival director Eric Gilbert, the increase in groups from around the globe is in part because the reputation of Treefort has travelled beyond U.S. borders. 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho Commission on the Arts (ICA) turns 50 this year. The organization, which is funded equally by state and federal funds, has a lot planned for its future. They're celebrating their big year with an arts-fueled social media campaign they're asking the public to take part in. (For more info on Art Sparks! Day, click here.)

 

Henry Whiting II

Nestled in the Hagerman Valley sits the only structure in Idaho designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Known as Teater’s Knoll, this artist retreat was built in 1952.

Lucy Dacus / Facebook

Boise State Public Radio is excited to host a special performance with Lucy Dacus, one of the 400+ bands set to play Treefort Music Fest. Dacus will play a free "prefort" show Wednesday, March 23 at 11 a.m. The event will take place at The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St, Boise.

Boise Shriners-Treefort Partnership Has Benefits For Both Groups

Mar 18, 2016
Patrick Sweeney / Treefort Music Fest

Shriners are generally known for riding around in miniature cars in parades, for circuses they sponsor and for the hospitals they operate for children.

But in Boise, Shriners have also become a linchpin in helping downtown host Treefort Music Fest, the City of Trees' annual indie music festival.

Screenshot / YouTube

The votes are in.

No, we aren't talking about the latest primary and caucus results for #Election2016. We're talking about the second annual NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert Contest (dare you to say that five times fast). 

Christina Birkinbine / Treefort Music Fest

Treefort volunteer coordinator Elizabeth Corsentino says since Treefort began in 2012, the festival heard from local nonprofits that wanted to get involved. Corsentino says this year, the team behind the festival created some new opportunities for these groups to get exposure – and hopefully get more helping hands.

Screenshot / Wild Lens Vimeo

A new film festival to celebrate the conservation community in Idaho and around the globe will be held Saturday night in Boise. The goal is to inspire viewers to get outside and help the land.

A film from a high school student in Victor, Idaho and a local film about ranchers making room for sage grouse are just some of the stories in the Les Bois Film Festival. Viewers will also see conservation films from Borneo and Singapore.

Bricolage

Chelsea Snow opened Bricolage in 2010, when the economy was still bleeding from the wounds of the Great Recession. The downtown Boise store sells things like handmade jewelry, cards and clothes.

But Snow’s vision was to create more than just a store – she wanted to make a community space where crafters of all levels could learn new skills. She hosted workshops on crafts like sewing and printmaking.

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

The Warhawk Air Museum in Nampa has been recording the stories of Idaho veterans for more than a decade. It’s part of the Library of Congress and its Veterans History Project.

Each veteran tells their story on video as a way to preserve the history of their service in their own words. Now the museum has gone a step further, with a new book that captures those stories in pictures and print.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Friday and Saturday Ballet Idaho does its winter show at Boise’s Morrison Center for the Performing Arts. And tickets sold much faster than usual. This ballet is made up of four short pieces but one of them in particular is generating the excitement.

At a recent rehearsal John Selya goes over trouble spots with Ballet Idaho dancers, an activity he calls slaying dragons.

Jeremy Conant / Treefort Music Fest

More than 440 bands will play this year’s Treefort Music Fest. Despite that huge number – which will be the most so far in the event’s five-year existence – festival director Eric Gilbert says the tough part of booking those artists was having to say “no” to many others.

Provided by Ross Partridge

Ross Partridge says above all else, aspiring filmmakers need to be extremely passionate about what they’re doing. Partridge is an actor, director and writer in Hollywood – and is hosting a screenwriters workshop at Boise State University Friday. He says one also has to be able to shut out the naysayers, and trust your instincts when it comes to storytelling.

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