Arts & Culture

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

You may see more people riding their bikes to work today. It’s Bike to Work Day, and here in the Boise area, it caps off a week of festivities all focused on cycling.

The Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance (TVCA) is behind Boise Bike Week. Rick Overton sits on the Alliance's board. He says Boise’s cycling culture has become more active in the past ten years and that, he says is part of a national trend.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Today, groups around the world are celebrating the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (I.D.A.H.O). Started in 2005 in Paris, the annual May 17 celebration has the acronym “IDAHO”. But this is the first year that the day is being celebrated in Idaho.

RE:site + Metalab

Boise is preparing to get some new art at City Hall. A panel of city officials has selected three sculpture projects, and now it’s the public’s turn to comment. Boise residents have until May 28 to make their opinion known about the $200,000 project.

Karen Bubb is the public arts manager at the Department of Arts and History. She says one of the three sculptures will replace the fountain and flag poles in front of city hall next year.

Patti Murphy
Courtesy Patti Murphy

This Sunday we celebrate our mothers - the ones who raised us, guided us and imparted words of wisdom. Boise author Patti Murphy knows quite a bit about those words of wisdom.  Her new book Mother Knows Better – Sense and Nonsense from American Moms is a collection of what she calls “momisms.”

“They’re the things that moms use to kind of either teach a lesson or encourage some behavior change,” Murphy explains. “Most people have heard the momism ‘Always wear clear underwear in case you get into a wreck.’ They are just things that people remembered their moms saying.”

Lucas Swope

Summer is right around the corner, now that Boise's Alive After Five Concert Series has been announced.

The concerts are in their 27th year, and will once again be held every Wednesday at the downtown's Grove Center beginning June 5.

Idaho Statesman

The Boise Department of Arts and History recently received some good news. Harvard University’s Ash Center has selected the department as one of the most innovative government entities in the country. 

Courtesy of Boise City Department of Arts and History

Idaho’s capital city turns 150 this year and to mark the occasion the ticketing lobby at the Boise Airport will be home to a commissioned mural. The city of Boise will commission the work. A national panel has narrowed the field to proposals from three Idaho artists.  

Tal Roberts / Visit Sun Valley

Ketchum is known for its recreational opportunities. Hiking, camping and river sports have long been touted as reasons for people to visit the Wood River Valley. But a distinction from a national arts organization could give the small community another claim to fame.

Sadie Babits / Boise State Public Radio

More than 60 artists will take part in Modern Art tonight in downtown Boise.  This year artists, who do everything from fine art to performance, will take over more than 30 rooms at the Modern Hotel.

Amy O’Brien is one of the curators for this event. She has some advice for people who’ve never been to Modern Art before. “I would say be prepared to be completely entertained and expect the unexpected.”

Courtesy of NPR/ Tony Nagelmann

You hear NPR’s popular quiz show Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! every Saturday morning on KBSX. Thursday night the radio show will be beamed into select cinemas across the U.S. including in Boise for the first time. You’ll see host Peter Sagal along with Carl Kasell and the whole cast of characters live on the big screen.

Courtesy of Bill Carman

Idaho artist Bill Carman is never at a loss for ideas. They come to him at all hours. So he keeps a sketch book with him during the day and a pad of paper on his night stand. “Ideas come to me right before I fall asleep so I have to write them down,” he says. “And hopefully I can read them in the morning. More often than not I can’t.”

Red S / Flickr

NPR has been bringing you stories about coffee this week.

We’ve learned about coffee habits in Scandinavia, how growers in Central America are going green, and how coffee consumption has changed world history. Now, we learn a little bit about coffee here in Idaho.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise’s Treefort Music Fest made some big strides in its second year. A month after the festival wrapped up, organizers say the festival grew more than was previously thought.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Boise residents speculated for a long time about a curse on the corner of 8th and Main in downtown. This valuable piece of real estate saw a building burn down. It spent years as a vacant lot then after a failed project, the downtown corner spent years as a hole in the ground. That hole had become a city landmark bordering on icon status by 2011.

Steve Smith Photography

Ballet Idaho premieres Swan Lake tonight. Here’s what you need to know about this classic ballet. There’s Prince Siegfried. He falls in love with a beautiful woman named Odette, who’s actually trapped in the body of a swan.

Phyllis Rothwell Affrunti dances the part of Odette. The lead dancer calls her character “fragile,” a beautiful creature that has been imprisoned as a swan by the evil wizard Von Rothbart. “She’s waiting for true love to come to save her,” explains Affrunti. “It’s the only thing that can.”

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