Arts & Culture

Boise 150, Community Conversation
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

This year, Boise turns 150-years-old. When it comes to national top 10 lists, the town has been competitive with much bigger cities like San Francisco, Seattle, and even New York City. But what exactly is it about Idaho’s capital city that makes it a place people love to call “home”?

During a community conversation hosted by the KBSX newsroom, Boiseans dug in to what makes the city tick.

Karen Bubb

Boise artist Karen Bubb took more than 1,000 photographs while she was in Cuba last December. She returned to create more than 100 paintings inspired by those photos.

Brian Thom and Ardele Hanson

Four years ago, Brian Thom, the Episcopal Bishop of Idaho, came up with a plan to ask Ardele Hanson to marry him.  He wanted to recreate a special moment by kayaking up the Snake River to a lush, green island they had visited that summer. 

In his pocket was an engagement gift, a heart-shaped necklace.  The couple sat down in the StoryCorps booth in Boise to talk about that day.

Dave Crawforth

Boise is 150-years-old this year. The same year that Idaho became a territory, 1863, Boise became a town.

Terri Schorzman knows the city well. She was born here and didn’t leave until she was in high school when her father took a job in Colorado. Schorzman says she had a circuitous route back to Boise, including 13 years in Washington D.C.

“It just seemed like the right thing to do,” she says. “I just wanted to raise my kids here.”  Schorzman and her family left Washington D.C. on a whim. She and her husband didn’t have any jobs lined up in Boise.  

Larry McCauley, StoryCorps
StoryCorps

It was just over 45 years ago when the first human heart transplant was performed in South Africa. Now, about 2,000 transplant surgeries happen every year in the United States.

Larry McCauley of Idaho is part of that statistic.  He's now 67, but on October 8, 1986, he had a heart transplant. Since then, McCauley has led a full life and works part time.

His friend Elise Daniel recently brought him to the StoryCorps booth in Boise to talk about his surgery and how it affected him.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

As Boise celebrates its 150th birthday this month, the city and its residents are also thinking about the next 150 years. Boise is looking toward community planning to meet its goal of becoming “the most livable city in the country.”  

And when it comes to planning a city’s future, Boise is looking to Jaap Vos. He is the director of the Department of Community and Regional Planning at Boise State University. Vos moved to town a year ago, and is building the academic program that will produce a new group of city planners.

The Things That Draw People To Boise (And What Pushes Them Away)

Jul 9, 2013
Boise, Foothills, City, Landscape
Seth Lemmons / Flickr Creative Commons

Every year Boise ranks on a slew of top 10 lists. The city has been placed among the best U.S.

Garrison Keillor
Erik Hageness

In the world of radio, few voices are as distinct as Garrison Keillor’s. 

The Minnesota native created the live weekend variety show “A Prairie Home Companion” nearly four decades ago.  The program has taken Keillor and his crew all over the U.S., and soon, perhaps, even overseas. 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise celebrated its 150 birthday Sunday with a massive party at Julia Davis Park. The City of Trees was officially platted July 7, 1863.

Mayor Dave Bieter led the birthday song for the crowd.  Crowds flocked to the shade, escaping the heat under food and beer tents.  The festivities included music from local indie rock group Finn Riggins, as well as more traditional music from Boise's past.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

This summer, more than 60,000 people are expected to see a play at the Idaho Shakespeare Festival. Of the five plays this season, perhaps the most anticipated is "Sweeney Todd".

This blood-drenched murder musical by Stephen Sondheim shocked audiences when it debuted more than 30 years ago. It’s had a large and loyal audience ever since, and in 2007 director Tim Burton made a movie version starring Johnny Depp.

This is not the Shakespeare Festival’s first dance with Sondheim but it is its first time with "Sweeney Todd". 

John Burns / Crew members of the USS Medrick AMc 203

Life aboard a minesweeper in World War II was dangerous duty. The boats swept harbors and coastline for the deadly underwater mines planted by Germany and Japan.  Two men, who now live in Idaho, were part of the U.S. Navy’s minesweeping fleet.

Boise Dept. of Arts & History

Boise celebrates its sesquicentennial this month and we want to hear your stories about living in Idaho's capital city. Come share your stories at our July 11 community conversation. You'll hear perspectives on the city from our guests who will include a historian and a city councilor.

Our guests will include Barbara Perry Bauer, a local historian who co-owns TAG Historical Research and Consulting in Boise. She has a special interest in neighborhood history and urban development and has managed historic site surveys throughout the Treasure Valley.

StoryCorps

Marilyn Shuler is perhaps best known for her work as the director of the Idaho Human Rights Commission from 1978 to 1998.  She fought against the Aryan Nations and pushed for basic human rights in the Gem State. 

But what many people don’t know is that at the age of 10, Shuler was diagnosed with polio while she was living in Salem, Oregon.  She sat down in the StoryCorps booth in Boise to talk about how it felt growing up in the 1950s with the illness.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

This time last year, Boise author Alan Heathcock gave two of his former students the green light to turn one of his stories into a film. Now, that film has wrapped up production. Here are some of the people behind the filming of Smoke.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

There’s something breathtaking about watching a real-life cowboy ride his horse through this green pasture near McCall, Idaho.

This Roy Rogers – not the 50’s era icon – is Alan Heathcock’s version of the star. The actor pulls the reigns gently, swings to the ground, and saunters over to a young man leaning half-dazed against an aspen tree.  

"Hey, Vernon," he says.

"Hey Roy. She's a hot one, ain't she?" asks the young man.

"It's hotter than a bull's breath out here."  

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