Arts & Culture

Grandma Kelsey
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise-based singer-songwriter Kelsey Swope, a.k.a. “Grandma Kelsey," will perform at Treefort Music Fest on Sunday. She played for us in the studio recently for what we're calling Studio 208 Sessions.

Over the coming months we hope to bring you more in studio performances from artists around Idaho. So enjoy and if you know of a local band or musician we should invite into our studio send them our way

Lucas James Swope

The Treefort Music Fest is underway in Boise and goes through this weekend. More than 260 indie and emerging bands will perform during the festival including local acts. Grandma Kelsey is one of them.

Jeremy Conant / Courtesy of Treefort Music Fest

Treefort Music Fest gets underway tonight in Boise. Local rock band Finn Riggins will kick off the second annual festival and bands will play into the early morning hours. The four day event will bring indie and emerging bands to a dozen venues in downtown. 

Frankie Barnhill has been covering the lead-up to Treefort, and she talked with Scott Graf about why Treefort is becoming a big deal for the Idaho music scene.

Courtesy of the Sun Valley Film Festival

Organizers of the Sun Valley Film Festival are calling this year’s event a success. Ticket sales nearly doubled from last year and eight awards were given to filmmakers.

Director Sean Baker received the Festival’s highest honor, the Vision Award, for his film Starlet. It’s about an unlikely friendship between a young aspiring actress and an elderly widow. 

From the Kyle McGrady collection, courtesy of Bob McGrady

Early in the last century, people living in Hells Canyon didn't have much contact with the outside world.  Their lifeline were  the mail boats that braved the challenging Snake River.  Former Lewis Clark State College professor Carole Simon-Smolinski has been studying Hells Canyon. She'll talk about the mail boat tradition tonight in Boise.  She says the boats started running around 100 years ago.

Foster Helps Cap Sun Valley Film Festival

Mar 18, 2013
NPR

The Sun Valley Film Festival wrapped up Sunday with actress Jodie Foster giving a public talk. Foster says she's excited about the festival because it brings unique films and the movie making process to the Wood River Valley.

Hollywood Comes To Sun Valley For Film Festival

Mar 15, 2013
Courtesy of the Sun Valley Film Festival

Sun Valley is no stranger to film. Several movies have been shot in the Wood River Valley, including 1985’s “Pale Rider” starring Clint Eastwood.  Last year, after finishing his latest story, screenwriter Ted Grennan came up with an idea that would add to the local film scene.    

“I really didn’t know what I was going to do next and a friend called and I said ‘What about a film festival in Sun Valley,’ and he said ‘there are film festivals everywhere.’ And I said ‘there is not one in Sun Valley’ and he said you might be on to something,” explains Grennan.

Courtesy of the Sun Valley Film Festival

The Sun Valley Film Festival gets underway today with its first ever Screenwriters Lab. Writer and actor Will McCormack will lead the three hour discussion.  You might recognize McCormack from a few appearances on the Sopranos or the film Syriana. 

But lately this actor turned screenwriter is best known for his breakout movie Celeste and Jesse Forever. He wrote that film with Rashida Jones who appears on the sitcom Parks and Recreation.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A Nampa man has taken his skills with computers and turned a children’s bedtime story into a new interactive e-book.  The work is a labor of love, literally.  The book is a legacy for his daughter who was the inspiration for the main character.

Randy Jamison reads the interactive e-book “Jubitron: The Girl Robot” with his nine-year-old daughter Jubilee.  “Isn’t this your favorite page?” asks Jamison.  “Yeah, it’s another one of my favorites,” says Jubilee.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The inaugural Boise Beardsmen Beard and Mustache Championships packed the house Saturday night at the Red Room. Men sporting bushy beards and twisted mustaches worked the rowdy crowd. They were judged in several categories including "Full Beard" and "Freestyle Beard." Female Beardsmen competed in the "Whiskerina" section. 

Matthew Wordell

Last June was a big month for Cody Gittings and Stephen Heleker. For one, the Boise filmmakers formed a media company shortly after Gittings graduated from Boise State. And two, the pair received the green light to pursue their most ambitious project yet: turning “Smoke,” a story by local author and professor Alan Heathcock – into a short film.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Scholars often look to Abraham Lincoln as one of the most important figures in American history. Memorials to the famous president continue almost 150 years after he was killed, including last year’s blockbuster film bearing his name.

Monday, Idaho memorialized Lincoln with a special ceremony, commemorating the sesquicentennial of the day he signed the bill designating the Idaho Territory. 

The Family of Woman Film Festival is underway in Sun Valley. One documentary that will be shown this weekend comes from Nisha Pahuja, a filmmaker who splits her time between India and Toronto. Her film, “The World Before Her,” looks at two different groups of women.

Courtesy of Family of Woman Film Festival

Most of the films you’ll see this weekend at the Family of Woman Film Festival in Sun Valley come from overseas. The festival will feature films from Egypt, Democratic Republic of Congo, and India. Only one film comes from the U.S. The Invisible War, which exposed the sexual assaults in the U.S. military. That documentary was recently nominated for an Academy Award. 

Boise Weekly

It’s Wednesday, so that means a new edition of Boise Weekly is out. Today’s paper is the latest work under the new editor Zach Hagadone.  

Hagadone has been reading the Boise Weekly for nearly 15 years. At 32, he's worked with the Associated Press, Idaho Business Review, and even started his own paper in his native Sandpoint.  In a recent interview with KBSX, Hagadone told us that alternative weeklies have been somewhat insulated in the changing world of print journalism.

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