Arts & Culture

The Idaho Statesman

Idaho music icon Rosalie Sorrels passed away Sunday. Known as the “Travelin’ Lady,” she drove around the country for decades, singing folk music and recording more than 20 albums. But she always came home to Idaho.

I met Rosalie in the early 1990s when a friend asked me to help produce a CD of union folk songs. Until then, I only knew her through her songs broadcast on KBSU radio. Many people knew her through her music, which spilled out of her, night after night, as she toured the country constantly.

Idaho Shakespeare Festival

Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s production of Hamlet, its first in more than a decade, continues at its amphitheater south of Boise through the month of June. The production, directed by ISF’s artistic producing director Charlie Fee, features an Elizabethan set design and on-stage seating for the audience.

But the real talk of the town surrounds the casting of Hamlet. Alternating in the lead role are Laura Welsh Berg and Jonathan Dyrud. And when they’re not playing Hamlet, the actors are also alternating in the supporting role of Rosencrantz.

Travis Estvold

Over the weekend, Idaho filmmaking teams were given 48 hours to put together a short film for the 14th annual i48 film competition and festival.

The statewide film competition and festival is an annual event that brings together teams of filmmakers of all levels. Founder of i-48, Andrew Ellis, channeled his passion for film into creating this timed event in 2004.

 

Matthew Murphy

The Phantom of the Opera has been haunting stages across the globe for more than thirty years and is now the longest-running musical in the history of Broadway. Andrew Llloyd Webber’s classic musical returns to Boise’s Morrison Center Wednesday, June 14 and continues for an extended stay through Sunday, June 25.

The star of the current North American tour of Phantom is Derrick Davis, only the third African American actor in the musical’s history to wear the famous mask. Just prior to arriving in Boise, Davis talks with Weekend Edition host George Prentice.

Google Maps / Surel's Place

Boise’s First Thursday is a well-known event in the Treasure Valley. Focused mostly on the visual arts – with music, theater and dance playing a role as well – it’s become a staple of the downtown scene each month.

Like any adventure centering on fried food, this one starts at a posh restaurant in Boise where the head chef has twice been nominated for a James Beard Award, commonly referred to as the “Oscar of cooking.”

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Apparently, Vogue is really into Idaho these days.

The formidable magazine published an online article titled “Why Boise, Idaho, Is a Growing Culinary Hotspot.” The piece, written by Jen Murphy, gives an overview of some of the well-loved local spots in the Capital City. Among them: Guru Donuts, the Basque Marketplace, Red Feather Lounge and State & Lemp.

Ted S. Warren / AP

Ernest Hemingway’s historic home in Ketchum has new ownership. The nonprofit and privately funded Community Library in Ketchum now owns Ernest Hemingway’s home along the Big Wood River.

 

 

Despite the new acquisition, Executive Director of the Community Library, Jenny Emery Davidson, intends to preserve the historical significance of Hemingway’s house.

 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

There’s a house in Garden City with strange noises happening inside.

Experimental electronic artist Gretchen Jude is playing around with all kinds of instruments, including the sound from a cracklebox. Jude is the artist-in-residence at Surel’s Place this month. She’s from Idaho, but has spent time in Japan and now lives in Hawaii – places that all come up in her newest piece which Jude will debut Friday night.

The Idaho Shakespeare Festival is preparing for another summer under the stars - its 41st season. This year’s repertory includes Wait Until Dark, A Midsummer’s Night Dream, a musical adaptation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Hound of the Baskervilles and a rather unique twist on Hamlet.

Weekend Edition’s George Prentice talks with the festival’s producing artistic director Charles Fee about how he builds a season and his unique casting decision for Hamlet.

Listen to their conversation below.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

A famed sculptor who calls Florence, Italy home finishes up a two-week course he’s teaching students in Boise State’s Fine Arts program today. A trip to his workshop is like a trip back in time.

Besides the constant clacking of chisels against blocks of imported Carrara marble, one of the most striking things about stepping into the back sculpture studio at the Ben Victor Gallery on campus is the dust. Little chips of rock and dust fly from each student’s block as they turn white stone into art.

The official launch party for Boise Bike Week is Monday evening at Highlands Hollow, but rides and events are taking place this weekend.

A bike corral will be at Saturday morning’s market in downtown Boise, and on Sunday there’s a brunch and ride.

National bike to work day comes on Friday, May 19. If you park a bicycle in the special bike valet in front Bittercreek Alehouse downtown, you can score a free beer between 3 and 8 p.m.

Vicky Bates

A new book follows the journey of a Sun Valley family in the 1990s when they're faced with the death of their son.

Rocky Bates struggled from the time he was adopted with medical issues. In the book “Empty Jacket,” his mother Vicky Bates chronicles Rocky’s struggles with illness, his childhood and his sudden death at age ten.

Boise Philharmonic Has A New Music Director

May 9, 2017

A year ago, the Boise Philharmonic began an intensive search for a new Music Director. They’ve now finalized their decision.

It was like a yearlong episode of “Survivor.” Seven conductors came to Boise, not just to interview for the open position of Music Director, but also to lead the Boise Philharmonic.

It was an unusual process for the candidates. All seven finalists played with the musicians and also met donors and audience members. In the end, only one was left standing.

Zoo Boise

Zoo Boise marks a milestone Friday. It was twenty years ago that Steve Burns joined up with the zoo.

Back then, Steve Burns was working at the Nature Conservancy in Washington D.C. He shifted gears and took the job as the Executive Director of the Friends of Zoo Boise. After three-and-a-half years, he added head of Zoo Boise to his title and now holds both jobs.

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