Birds

Wildlife
10:38 am
Wed August 6, 2014

Fatal Attraction: Ospreys In A Bind With Baling Twine, Fishing Line

This is how ospreys' unhealthy affinity for baling twine can kill. Idaho Fish and Game biologist Beth Waterbury rescued this osprey in the nick of time.
Beth Waterbury Idaho Fish and Game

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 2:37 pm

Osprey nests are a common sight near rivers, lakes and bays in the Northwest. If you look closely with binoculars, you might notice some of these large raptors like to line their nests with discarded baling twine or fishing line. The problem is it can kill them.

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Documentary
9:55 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Meet Idaho's 'Bluebird Man' Who Helped The Species Make A Comeback

Al Larson and one of the nest boxes on his Bluebird Trail.
Credit Matthew Podolsky

For the last 35 years, Al Larson has been helping bluebirds thrive in Idaho. He loves bluebirds. He’s known around birding circles as Idaho’s “bluebird man.” “That’s what they call me. I haven’t sprouted wings yet,” Larson chuckles.

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Wildlife
6:09 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Environmentalists See Chance To Quash Idaho Raven-Killing Experiment

File photo of a common raven

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 8:18 am

A plan to poison 3,500 ravens in Idaho won’t proceed this year as state wildlife managers had hoped. The idea is to stop the ravens from eating the eggs of the imperilled sage grouse.

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Wildlife
9:21 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Idaho Officials Scrap Plan To Poison Ravens

Credit Doug Brown / Flickr Creative Commons

A plan by state wildlife biologist to kill 4,000 ravens in three Idaho areas this spring by feeding them poisoned chicken eggs has been scrapped due to federal environmental permitting delays.

The Times-News reports in a story on Tuesday that Idaho Fish and Game officials won't start the two-year program this spring aimed at boosting sage grouse numbers.

State officials say Fish and Wildlife Services is the only entity in the state with permission to administer the poison.

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Dams
11:51 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Army Corps To Kill Birds At Snake And Columbia River Dams

Columbia River Gorge
Credit Shawn Kinkade / Flickr

The Army Corps of Engineers this spring will begin killing birds at some Snake and Columbia river dams to help protect juvenile salmon and steelhead.

The agency unveiled a plan Thursday that will allow as many as 1,200 California gulls, 650 ring-billed gulls and 150 double-crested cormorants to be killed.

The Lewiston Tribune says the action will occur at McNary Dam on the Columbia River and Ice Harbor, Lower Monumental, Little Goose and Lower Granite dams on the Snake River.

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Wildlife
8:00 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Study: Climate Change Means More Raptors Are Wintering In Idaho

The American Kestrel was one of six raptors whose winter range is changing. The others are golden eagles, Northern harriers, prairie falcons, red-tailed hawks, and rough-legged hawks.
Credit Neil Paprocki

People in Idaho are seeing more raptors because golden eagles and red-tailed hawks aren't flying as far south for winter. That's according to a new study from Boise State University. The study authors say the change in migration habits means fewer of the birds of prey are being spotted in southern states.

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Wildlife
4:14 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Drought Could Be Diminishing Sandhill Crane Population In Idaho

One of the Sandhill Crane's habitats is Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Idaho.
Credit Charles Peterson / Flickr Creative Commons

The Sandhill Crane may be one species that's seeing the impact of dry conditions. Crane numbers in Idaho have continued to decline in the past three years.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says that decline means a lower number of those birds can be hunted this season. The Pacific Flyway Council (PFC) is the governing body that monitors migratory bird populations in the West. Every September the group oversees bird counts in 11 states and sets rules about hunting.

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Kestrels
2:06 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Kestrels Return To Boise Nest Box: Research Project Grows Dramatically

Last year's kestrel family grew to 7, with five chicks
Credit The Peregrine Fund

The Peregrine Fund’s American Kestrel Partnership launched its 2013 KestrelCams today.  Already the breeding pair has laid one egg. 

Last year, we told you about the project's kickoff in Boise to sign up citizen scientists to build nest boxes for these dwindling birds.  

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Research
6:00 am
Tue December 18, 2012

Idaho Researchers Study Impact Of Road Noise On Animals In Boise's Foothills

Field biologist Rose Swift examines a red-naped sapsucker.
Samantha Wright Boise State Public Radio

Scientists are trying to understand how road noise affects animals. So they’ve set up a road of sorts in the hills above Boise and they’re capturing birds to find answers.

Heidi Ware holds an angry bird in her hand. “This is a Cassin's Vireo and they’re pretty well-known for being pretty feisty birds in the hand, so you can see he’s biting my finger right now.”

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Environment
12:35 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Kestrel Chicks Hatch In Boise

Kestrels in Boise nest box
The Peregrine Fund

The kestrels have hatched!  In a story we told you last month, the Peregrine Fund is asking citizen scientists to put up nest boxes and monitor American Kestrel populations across the U.S.  The American Kestrel Partnership has a box with a webcam posted at the

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Environment
6:34 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Citizen Scientists Get Chance To Help Declining Kestrels

Kestral On Top Of Nest Box
American Kestrel Partnership The Peregrine Fund

It’s nesting time for many birds in Idaho, including the American Kestrel.  In fact, you can watch a pair of kestrels sitting on their eggs right now, through a live webcam.  It’s part of a new project by the Peregrine Fund that launches today to get people involved in helping gather information n kestrels.  The goal is to help scientists understand why the American Kestrel is in steady decline across North America.

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