Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Monday marks the opening of a much-anticipated new transit center in downtown Boise. Transit officials with Valley Regional Transit, the inter-county agency that runs the bus system in the Treasure Valley, is betting the facility will make riding the bus more comfortable.

But will Main Street Station attract new riders? To answer that question, KBSX got on a bus with Kim Wegener one morning in early October. Wegener lives in Eagle and commutes most mornings to downtown Boise to her job at Ballet Idaho. 

Copyright James Castle Collection and Archive, L.P.

The City of Boise is working to preserve the property where Idaho artist James Castle lived and worked.

Castle is known worldwide for his drawings, many of which he created in Boise from the 1930s until his death in 1977. He was deaf and used his homegrown art to communicate.

Boise Parks and Recreation

Friday, Boise opened the last section of the Boise Greenbelt. It comes nearly fifty years after the city started gathering up land to create the iconic foot-and-bike-path.

The new .9-mile section is on the south side of the Boise River between Americana Boulevard and Garden City. With this section, Boise says the Greenbelt is complete within city limits. The footpath stretches nearly 26 miles along both sides of the river.

U.S. Navy

It’s Navy Week in Boise, an event designed to bring the Navy to places that don’t have a port and don’t get a lot of contact with this segment of the Armed Forces.

Every year since 2005, the Navy has picked a small number of cities for Navy Week. This year, fifteen cities have the honor, including Dayton, Des Moines and Boise.

Sailors are in town to show off their skills. That includes sailors from the city’s namesake, the USS Boise.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The drive-through window behind the Moxie Java on Boise’s Vista Avenue is for cars, not trains. That’s not a point one usually has to make but in this case, a set of train tracks terminates just a few feet away from that window and the back wall of that coffee shop and its neighbors, Blimpie and the UPS Shop.

Organizers have announced sponsorships details of a new marathon to be run this fall in Boise.

The Onward Shay! Marathon and Half Marathon is scheduled for October 30. The event will honor the legacy of runner Shay Hirsch, who died of cancer in 2014.

Ada County Sheriff's Office / Facebook

Update, Thursday at 5:21 p.m.: Fire crews have reached 80 percent containment on the Mile Marker 14 fire.

Update, Thursday at 10:38 a.m.: The latest tweet from BLM Idaho shows progress is being made in containing the fire: 

Gordon Bowen Collection / Boise City Department of Arts and History

It’s 25 miles long and stretches from Eagle to Lucky Peak. The Greenbelt is Boise’s premiere biking and walking path. But how did dozens of separate chunks of riverside pathway eventually end up as one long greenbelt?

Using city documents, interviews with Greenbelt pioneers and historical research, Author David Proctor tells the story in his new book, “Pathway of Dreams: Building the Boise Greenbelt.”

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

The Ada County Sheriff says in less than 24 hours over the Fourth of July holiday, his dispatch office received 235 fireworks complaints and 33 reports of grass fires.

Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan says at least 12 fires in Boise were likely caused by fireworks over the Monday holiday. And the Table Rock Fire in the Boise Foothills last week, which burned a home, was caused by illegal fireworks. The Nampa Fire Marshal says illegal fireworks likely burned down a home Tuesday morning.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Table Rock Fire started late Wednesday night and continued into Thursday. By mid-morning officials said it had burned 2,500 acres but was mostly contained. The fire destroyed two structures including a home. Investigators say it was caused by fireworks. 

Scott Graf, Boise State Public Radio

Final update: Crews reached full containment on the Table Rock Fire at 9 o'clock Thursday evening. Boise Fire officials say crews will monitor the fire through at least Friday to maintain containment. 

Update, 5:35 p.m.: Fire crews continued to make progress on the Table Rock Friday Thursday afternoon. Boise Fire Department officials said just before 5:30 that the fire is now 85 percent contained and that full containment is expected by 10 p.m.

Boise Police Department Cop Car
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Update, 3:44 p.m.: The Ada County Coroner's Office says the Kuna man who died after shooting a Boise police officer late Tuesday night killed himself. Officials say Alan Amundson died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. In the announcement, the coroner's office also corrected Amnundson's age to show he was 53-years-old. A previous release said he was 52.

Update, 12:30 p.m.: The Ada County Coroner's Office has identified the deceased as 52-year-old Alan Amundson of Kuna. He died at the scene. An autopsy is scheduled for Wednesday afternoon. 

Kyle Green, Idaho Statesman

Organizers say after a gunman killed 49 people at a gay bar in Orlando last week, Boise's annual LGBT celebration known as Pridefest could go a couple of different ways. Fewer people might show up this weekend for Pridefest because of fear of anti-gay violence. Or, more people might turn out to show solidarity with the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Castle Rock sticks out of the foothills in northeast Boise. Native Americans called it Eagle Rock and the land below it was considered sacred. But the U.S. Army rounded up the area’s Indians and sent them to reservations to make way for white settlers in the late 1800s. The descendants of those people are gathering Friday in Boise’s Quarry View Park, which is on part of that land below Castle Rock.

provided by Boise Police Department

Boise Police have joined other departments around the country to equip officers with body cameras. As of this week, 30 police officers have begun wearing cameras while on patrol. It’s the first group to receive the cameras, and it will take a year for the rest of the 250 cameras to be distributed.

Jeff Turner / Flickr Creative Commons

Fire trucks with red, white and blue bunting, kids on their parents' shoulders waving little flags: what’s more emblematic of American patriotism than a Fourth of July parade? Now the volunteer group that has organized Boise’s parade for the last 20 years is concerned about paying for it in the future.

Idaho Housing and Finance Association Facebook page

The City of Boise Thursday celebrated the opening of a new apartment complex for low-income seniors. It’s called the Vineyard at Eagle Promenade, though it’s actually in Boise just across the road from Eagle. The City of Boise helped pay for the 30-unit project along with several partners, including the Idaho Housing and Finance association and New Beginnings Housing which has other low-income housing in Nampa, Caldwell and Hailey.

Erin Pass / Flickr Creative Commons

After nine years, a beloved arts event in downtown Boise is coming to an end. Modern Art (which takes over the Modern Hotel Thursday evening for the last time) began at the height of the Great Recession. Now, the hotel staff says it’s time to retire the event – but not without one big final party.

TASER International / Facebook

A Wall Street Journal investigation this week highlights some possibly shady business practices by Taser, the maker of the eponymous shock device and other police hardware. It uses the Boise Police Department’s nearly $1.5 million body camera deal with Taser last year as an example.

According to the Journal, Taser convinces police departments it is the only company that can provide services in order to secure contracts without having to go through an open bidding process. That’s done, the Journal says, by giving free trips to decision makers.

Justin Doering / Fifty Sandwiches blog

Recent Boise State University media studies graduate Justin Doering has set out on a unique cross-country journey.

Through a blog he's calling "Fifty Sandwiches," Doering has set out to interview people experiencing homelessness. The blogger says the idea is to "close the gap between perception and reality" when it comes to what homeless individuals experience.