Boise Police Department

Boise Police Department

It’s been two weeks since the Boise Police Department began investigating a missing persons case involving 18-year-old Sierra Bush. Since then, very few details about the case have been released publicly.

A Boise police officer has been cleared of any wrongdoing after firing a shot at a suspect that missed.

The Boise Police Department in a decision announced Wednesday says Twin Falls County Prosecutor Grant Loebs determined Officer Michelle Havens acted according to protocol.

Police say that Havens fired one shot at Jennie Timmons in early March after Timmons didn't follow verbal commands and brandished an all-black BB gun that looked like a real firearm.

Police say evidence indicates Timmons attempted to force officers to shoot her.

Boise Police Department City Hall Logo
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Boise Police Chief William Bones says there was a palpable sense of heartache at BPD headquarters Friday morning after the shooting Thursday night in Dallas that killed five police officers. We spoke with Bones Friday after he completed a previously-scheduled bike patrol.

Bones says the Dallas shooting has made him more grateful for the relatively positive relationship his officers have with their community.

Boise Police Department Cop Car
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Update, 3:44 p.m.: The Ada County Coroner's Office says the Kuna man who died after shooting a Boise police officer late Tuesday night killed himself. Officials say Alan Amundson died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. In the announcement, the coroner's office also corrected Amnundson's age to show he was 53-years-old. A previous release said he was 52.

Update, 12:30 p.m.: The Ada County Coroner's Office has identified the deceased as 52-year-old Alan Amundson of Kuna. He died at the scene. An autopsy is scheduled for Wednesday afternoon. 

Boise Police Department Cop Car
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Update - Wednesday, June 15 at 9:16 a.m.: Authorities say a southwest Idaho man shot and killed by police spent decades in prison before being released in February.

Fifty-year-old Noel Rodriguez of Caldwell died Tuesday when a Boise police officer opened fire after authorities say Rodriguez rammed police vehicles with his vehicle.

Rodriguez was sentenced in 1992 to life in prison following the beating death of a 29-year-old woman in Wilder.

Boise Police Department / Cold Case

Boise Police are trying to crack a murder case that’s 39 years old. Despite the passing of time, they’re hoping for new leads in a Cold Case that happened back in 1977.

The Crime: It was April 20, 1977. Oney Leiby, 62, was a night watchman at Thriftway Lumber in Boise. He was murdered in the middle of the night while on duty, leaving behind a wife and two grown sons.

provided by Boise Police Department

Boise Police have joined other departments around the country to equip officers with body cameras. As of this week, 30 police officers have begun wearing cameras while on patrol. It’s the first group to receive the cameras, and it will take a year for the rest of the 250 cameras to be distributed.

Boise Police Department City Hall Logo
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

If you’ve been in downtown Boise on a Friday or Saturday night, you may have seen – or heard – cars cruising on Main and Idaho streets. Modified mufflers and blasting stereos are pretty hard to miss, after all.

But according to a press release from the Boise police department, the drivers could be fined for being too loud.

phone, office
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

A new phone scam has hit the area, according to the Boise Police Department.

Scammers are able to manipulate the caller ID so the phone call appears to be from a BPD phone number. They claim Boise Police have a warrant out for their arrest on an unpaid payday type loan. The scammers say officers will arrest them unless the money is paid over the phone.

TASER International / Facebook

A Wall Street Journal investigation this week highlights some possibly shady business practices by Taser, the maker of the eponymous shock device and other police hardware. It uses the Boise Police Department’s nearly $1.5 million body camera deal with Taser last year as an example.

According to the Journal, Taser convinces police departments it is the only company that can provide services in order to secure contracts without having to go through an open bidding process. That’s done, the Journal says, by giving free trips to decision makers.

m br / Flickr

The Boise Police Department says there were two reports of sexual assault that were recanted in the past few weeks. But officers want to make sure anyone who has been the victim of a crime is not afraid to make a report. The Department also works hard to prevent crimes, like rape and sexual assault, before they happen.

Roadsidepictures / Flickr

Boise Police recently investigated two cases of sexual assault. One was reported near the Boise River and the other in west Boise. But in both cases, the women who said they were assaulted later recanted their stories.

Police issued a statement after the second case, saying they don’t want such incidents to keep other women from reporting sexual assaults.

Angie Munson is a detective in the Special Victims Unit at BPD. She’s been an officer for 27 years and has worked on over 2,000 cases, most of them sex crimes. / Flickr

Idaho lawmakers passed a bill Monday to allow people 21 years old and up to carry concealed, loaded guns without permits or training.

Currently, Idaho allows people to carry a gun openly without a permit. A majority of the 22 people who testified were in favor of the bill.

Boise Police Chief Bill Bones testified against the bill Monday.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Maureen Wishkoski is a morning person. Wishkoski is the court advocate manager at the Women’s and Children’s Alliance in Boise. Most days she gets up before 6:00 a.m. and heads to the Ada County Courthouse, where she meets with clients in need of legal help.

Some of her clients are looking for relief from stalking, a crime that she says can have serious mental and emotional impacts. According to the national Stalking Resource Center, 7.5 million people are stalked across the country every year. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

In the months leading up to the eviction of more than 100 people from a tent city near downtown, Boise city leaders frequently cited crime as one of the main reasons the camp needed to be cleared.

TASER International

The Boise City Council is set to vote on a contract worth more than $1.4 million that will equip police officers with body cameras.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Update 5:30 p.m.: According to Boise Police Sgt. John Terry, there have been no arrests at Cooper Court. Police have been going tent-to-tent and the homeless people camping there are gone. Terry says there was some verbal resistance at first, but after explaining the options, people left without quarrel. 

Original post: On Friday, the City of Boise began taking new action on the homeless encampment known as Cooper Court. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

On Friday morning, Boise Police will begin clearing a homeless camp near downtown.

The camp in an alley known as Cooper Court has been around since early summer and nearly 100 people sleep there. City leaders have said for months that the camp is unsafe, unhealthy and would not be allowed to remain long term.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

It may be the beginning of the end for the homeless tent city near downtown Boise.

Thursday morning residents of the alley known as Cooper Court were awoken by Boise Police officers handing out warnings. The notices listed several laws people were breaking by sleeping in the alley and notified them that they could be fined or jailed.

The tents are located by the Connector in downtown, in an alley off Americana Boulevard and River Street. It's behind the Interfaith Sanctuary homeless shelter.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

After two years without one, Boise will soon have its next ombudsman in place.

Mayor David Bieter announced Friday that attorney Natalie Camacho Mendoza will assume the role on August 3, pending city council approval.  Council members are expected to approve the selection at their meeting Tuesday.

Camacho Mendoza is originally from Pocatello.  She’s been in Boise for 20 years and has practiced law for 26.  Her experience includes work as a defense attorney and prosecutor.