Boise State University

Boise State University, campus
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Treasure Valley students and residents this fall will have an opportunity to take classes from Harvard Business School without leaving Idaho. Boise State University and the famed Ivy League school announced a new partnership Thursday.

Kristina Anderson

A woman who survived the mass shooting at Virginia Tech nine years ago is bringing her message of safety to Boise State University.

Kristina Anderson was in French class on April 16, 2007 when another student walked into her building, chained the doors shut, and started shooting at teachers and students. Anderson was shot three times. The gunman killed 32 people and wounded 17 others before taking his own life.

Now, Anderson travels the country telling her story and encouraging people to talk about safety in schools, businesses and public spaces.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State University and Concordia Law School have created an arrangement aimed at undergrads who want to go to law school. Students can start at Concordia after three years at Boise State. For students in the “three plus three” program, the first year at Concordia will also count as the fourth year at Boise State. So students could get a bachelor's and a law degree in six years, rather than seven.

Concordia Law dean Cathy Silak says the program will help students minimize debt and get to the workforce quicker. She says it was a natural partnership.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A group of Boise State University students got glowing reviews after the tool they built for NASA was put through its paces last month.

The tool, known as the Zero Operable Interplanetary Delivery Based Ergonomics Grabber, is called Zoidberg 2.0 for short. Zoidberg is a character on the cartoon Futurama.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

Mercury is passing between the Earth and the sun Monday, an event known as a planet transit. It’s an event important to scientists that anyone with a special telescope can watch.

The Physics department at Boise State University is setting up filtered telescopes to watch the event.

Professor Brian Jackson says during the transit, the Earth will be in Mercury’s shadow.

Boise State University

Boise State and Idaho State will hold spring commencement ceremonies Saturday. 

Boise State says 2334 students are eligible for degrees and certificates following the spring semester. All told, about 4,000 students will graduate from Boise State this academic year. 

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A group of Boise State students has built a tool for NASA that one day might go into space. The Microgravity team is in NASA in Houston this week, where it will be tested by experts. If it does well, NASA may use the design on a mission to study asteroids.

“It’s kind of heavy. This is last year’s tool, if it wants to cooperate,” Boise State University student Chris Ruby is holding what looks like a weird, oversized pistol with boxes on one end. Everyone on the Microgravity team calls it “The Tool.”

Boise State University

Update: March 18, 2016

Our original story said that Leroy was up for adoption. Sadly, Leroy took a turn for the worst and passed away on Thursday.

Leroy suffered from abuse and neglect before he was rescued by Boise Bully Breed Rescue. On their Facebook page, the group said Leroy took a turn for the worst after the last few days. The group says Leroy spent the last four months with a better quality of life and a chance to “be a happy dog again.”

Boise State University School of Public Service

In a public opinion poll from Boise State University that we’ve been reporting on this week, respondents overwhelmingly named education as the most important issue in Idaho. But, that desire to focus on education comes with a pretty low opinion of the state’s school system.

Boise State University School of Public Service

Only a few of the 1,000 Idahoans who took a new public opinion poll saw immigration as a big priority for the state.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Fewer than three percent of those polled said the environment should be the first priority of state lawmakers. That's according to a new survey from Boise State University – which 1,000 Idaho residents took part in a month ago. Those surveyed rate protecting the environment far below economic growth. Respondents were mostly split along party lines, with Democrats more likely to prioritize the environment over Republicans.

Boise State University has revived a longtime poll.

For 21 years between 1990 and 2011, Boise State offered an annual glimpse into the mindset of the Idaho electorate. On Monday, the university’s new School of Public Service announced a 2016 version.

Jeffrey Johnson

There’s a volcano in Guatemala that erupts on a regular basis, so regular that some scientists call it the “Old Faithful” of volcanoes. That makes it very popular with people who study volcanoes, like Boise State Professor Jeffrey Johnson.

Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, Johnson recently led 60 researchers from Mexico, France, Italy and the United Kingdom to conduct different studies on the volcano. He returned last month and says the work being done in Guatemala could someday help scientists better predict how other volcanoes will behave.

Provided by Ross Partridge

Ross Partridge says above all else, aspiring filmmakers need to be extremely passionate about what they’re doing. Partridge is an actor, director and writer in Hollywood – and is hosting a screenwriters workshop at Boise State University Friday. He says one also has to be able to shut out the naysayers, and trust your instincts when it comes to storytelling.

USGS

Just ten miles from downtown Boise, scientists are studying golden eagle migration in southwest Idaho. And they’re using roadkill to do it.

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Boise State University and Idaho Fish and Game created a series of motion-sensitive camera traps. They drag a 250-pound road-killed elk through the snow to the trap and leave. The cameras do the work, snapping pictures of whatever scavenger comes by for a snack.

Idaho Statesman

A reporter who’s been one of Idaho’s most widely-read journalists is stepping down next week.

For 14 years, Chadd Cripe has covered Boise State football for the Idaho Statesman. His articles and Tweets are consistently among the paper’s most popular coverage, sports or otherwise. Next week, he’ll leave the beat and cover recreation and the outdoors.

medical marijuana, pot
Audio Vision, Public Radio / Flickr Creative Commons

What’s being billed as a town hall meeting on marijuana policy is scheduled for 7:00 p.m. Tuesday at the Boise State University Student Union Building. The forum will include some influential figures with differing perspectives on the pot legalization.

Speakers include a pro-marijuana blogger, a pro-marijuana radio personality, someone from the Idaho State Police and Elisha Figueroa - the head of the governor’s Office for Drug Policy.

Boise State University

Many Boiseans woke up Friday to news that a former president at Boise State University had passed away.

Dr. John Keiser served as president from 1978 to 1991, and is credited with beginning a major transformation at the institution. For instance, facilities like Morrison Center and Taco Bell Arena were built during his tenure. The famous blue football turf was also installed while Keiser was president.

Some of the nation's most formidable statesmen and women were guests of  Friday's Frank Church Conference on Public Affairs, now in its 32nd year. The Boise State conference attracted ambassadors, scholars, authors and U.S. State Department officials. They were on hand to deconstruct this year's theme: Clash of Cultures, The Middle East in Turmoil. 
 

Ambassador Gerald Feierstein was invited to consider this week's fifth anniversary of the rise of the Arab Spring. Feierstein is the current Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of Near East 

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

In his State of the State speech Monday, Idaho Governor Butch Otter said education is his top legislative priority this year. The Republican’s budget proposal includes millions of dollars in new funding for K-through-12 schools. 

But based on percentage, the increases Otter is requesting for higher education are even larger.  The governor’s budget hints at some changing priorities in state government.

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