Boise State University

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

 

A rare copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio is in Boise for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. This 400-year-old book is the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays. It has immense historical significance and is sought-after by collectors. Copies can sell for millions of dollars. Boise State has gone to great lengths to create a memorable experience and ensure the book’s safety.

Boise State University

"I came to be inspired. I need inspiration."

Those words were one bookend, spoken by a two-year Boise State University employee as she walked to the Morrison Center auditorium on Wednesday morning. 

Wiki Media Commons

A valuable, rare book is coming to Idaho for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. is doing a national tour of the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays, known as the First Folio. The university expects thousands of people to come and see this 400-year-old book.

To explain why this book is considered so important, George Prentice talked with reporter and the KBSX newsroom’s resident Shakespeare enthusiast Adam Cotterell.

Ian Robertson / Boise State University

A small, flowering plant that grows only in southwest Idaho is about to go back on the Endangered Species List. Slickspot Peppergrass has been there before, in 2009, but its status as “threatened” was challenged by Governor Butch Otter.

After years of legal wrangling, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to put it back on the list next month.

Slickspot Peppergrass is a hairy green plant with white flowers, and is found in just a few areas of southwest Idaho.

Albertsons, stadium
Boise State University

Boise State is reportedly among 17 schools that will make a formal pitch to officials from the Big 12 to join the athletic conference.

ESPN's Brett McMurphy reports Big 12 administrators will host video conferences with representatives of the interested schools. Boise State is currently a member of the lower profile Mountain West Conference.

gray wolf, wolves
U.S. Fish & Wildlife

A Boise State academic is studying what it takes for humans and large carnivores to live together in the same environment.

Neil Carter is an assistant professor at Boise State. His study tries to figure out how humans can successfully coexist with large carnivores, like bears, wolves and tigers.

He found that humans are already adapting to living with animals, as we encroach on their territory. But he also found that the animals are adapting, too, to changes brought by people.

Boise State University

Thirty-two Idaho delegates are among those who kicked off the Republican National Convention in Cleveland Monday. The 20 Ted Cruz supporters and 12 Donald Trump delegates had a front row seat to the somewhat chaotic start to the event.

Another Idahoan in Cleveland this week is Corey Cook. Cook is the dean of Boise State University’s School of Public Service. It’s his sixth convention and our Scott Graf spoke with him about his expectations for the week.

Hear their Morning Edition conversation below. 

NASA, ESA, and J. Nichos (University of Leicester)

The NASA space probe Juno arrives at Jupiter on the Fourth of July.

The probe will study Jupiter’s atmosphere, magnetic fields, and auroras. The hope is to better understand the planet's origin and evolution.

Boise State's physics department will use telescopes to get a close-up look at Jupiter Monday night as Juno starts orbiting the planet.

Boise State University, campus
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Treasure Valley students and residents this fall will have an opportunity to take classes from Harvard Business School without leaving Idaho. Boise State University and the famed Ivy League school announced a new partnership Thursday.

Kristina Anderson

A woman who survived the mass shooting at Virginia Tech nine years ago is bringing her message of safety to Boise State University.

Kristina Anderson was in French class on April 16, 2007 when another student walked into her building, chained the doors shut, and started shooting at teachers and students. Anderson was shot three times. The gunman killed 32 people and wounded 17 others before taking his own life.

Now, Anderson travels the country telling her story and encouraging people to talk about safety in schools, businesses and public spaces.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State University and Concordia Law School have created an arrangement aimed at undergrads who want to go to law school. Students can start at Concordia after three years at Boise State. For students in the “three plus three” program, the first year at Concordia will also count as the fourth year at Boise State. So students could get a bachelor's and a law degree in six years, rather than seven.

Concordia Law dean Cathy Silak says the program will help students minimize debt and get to the workforce quicker. She says it was a natural partnership.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A group of Boise State University students got glowing reviews after the tool they built for NASA was put through its paces last month.

The tool, known as the Zero Operable Interplanetary Delivery Based Ergonomics Grabber, is called Zoidberg 2.0 for short. Zoidberg is a character on the cartoon Futurama.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

Mercury is passing between the Earth and the sun Monday, an event known as a planet transit. It’s an event important to scientists that anyone with a special telescope can watch.

The Physics department at Boise State University is setting up filtered telescopes to watch the event.

Professor Brian Jackson says during the transit, the Earth will be in Mercury’s shadow.

Boise State University

Boise State and Idaho State will hold spring commencement ceremonies Saturday. 

Boise State says 2334 students are eligible for degrees and certificates following the spring semester. All told, about 4,000 students will graduate from Boise State this academic year. 

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A group of Boise State students has built a tool for NASA that one day might go into space. The Microgravity team is in NASA in Houston this week, where it will be tested by experts. If it does well, NASA may use the design on a mission to study asteroids.

“It’s kind of heavy. This is last year’s tool, if it wants to cooperate,” Boise State University student Chris Ruby is holding what looks like a weird, oversized pistol with boxes on one end. Everyone on the Microgravity team calls it “The Tool.”

Boise State University

Update: March 18, 2016

Our original story said that Leroy was up for adoption. Sadly, Leroy took a turn for the worst and passed away on Thursday.

Leroy suffered from abuse and neglect before he was rescued by Boise Bully Breed Rescue. On their Facebook page, the group said Leroy took a turn for the worst after the last few days. The group says Leroy spent the last four months with a better quality of life and a chance to “be a happy dog again.”

Boise State University School of Public Service

In a public opinion poll from Boise State University that we’ve been reporting on this week, respondents overwhelmingly named education as the most important issue in Idaho. But, that desire to focus on education comes with a pretty low opinion of the state’s school system.

Boise State University School of Public Service

Only a few of the 1,000 Idahoans who took a new public opinion poll saw immigration as a big priority for the state.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Fewer than three percent of those polled said the environment should be the first priority of state lawmakers. That's according to a new survey from Boise State University – which 1,000 Idaho residents took part in a month ago. Those surveyed rate protecting the environment far below economic growth. Respondents were mostly split along party lines, with Democrats more likely to prioritize the environment over Republicans.

Boise State University has revived a longtime poll.

For 21 years between 1990 and 2011, Boise State offered an annual glimpse into the mindset of the Idaho electorate. On Monday, the university’s new School of Public Service announced a 2016 version.

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