Boise State University

USGS

Just ten miles from downtown Boise, scientists are studying golden eagle migration in southwest Idaho. And they’re using roadkill to do it.

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Boise State University and Idaho Fish and Game created a series of motion-sensitive camera traps. They drag a 250-pound road-killed elk through the snow to the trap and leave. The cameras do the work, snapping pictures of whatever scavenger comes by for a snack.

Idaho Statesman

A reporter who’s been one of Idaho’s most widely-read journalists is stepping down next week.

For 14 years, Chadd Cripe has covered Boise State football for the Idaho Statesman. His articles and Tweets are consistently among the paper’s most popular coverage, sports or otherwise. Next week, he’ll leave the beat and cover recreation and the outdoors.

medical marijuana, pot
Audio Vision, Public Radio / Flickr Creative Commons

What’s being billed as a town hall meeting on marijuana policy is scheduled for 7:00 p.m. Tuesday at the Boise State University Student Union Building. The forum will include some influential figures with differing perspectives on the pot legalization.

Speakers include a pro-marijuana blogger, a pro-marijuana radio personality, someone from the Idaho State Police and Elisha Figueroa - the head of the governor’s Office for Drug Policy.

Boise State University

Many Boiseans woke up Friday to news that a former president at Boise State University had passed away.

Dr. John Keiser served as president from 1978 to 1991, and is credited with beginning a major transformation at the institution. For instance, facilities like Morrison Center and Taco Bell Arena were built during his tenure. The famous blue football turf was also installed while Keiser was president.

Some of the nation's most formidable statesmen and women were guests of  Friday's Frank Church Conference on Public Affairs, now in its 32nd year. The Boise State conference attracted ambassadors, scholars, authors and U.S. State Department officials. They were on hand to deconstruct this year's theme: Clash of Cultures, The Middle East in Turmoil. 
 

Ambassador Gerald Feierstein was invited to consider this week's fifth anniversary of the rise of the Arab Spring. Feierstein is the current Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of Near East 

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

In his State of the State speech Monday, Idaho Governor Butch Otter said education is his top legislative priority this year. The Republican’s budget proposal includes millions of dollars in new funding for K-through-12 schools. 

But based on percentage, the increases Otter is requesting for higher education are even larger.  The governor’s budget hints at some changing priorities in state government.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Boise State University has achieved an academic distinction its leaders say has been more than a decade in the making. The school announced Wednesday its classification as a “Doctoral Research” institution by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.

To achieve the designation, institutions need to award at least 20 research and scholarship doctoral degrees in a given year.

"Idaho Microbes"

They’re in craft beer made in McCall, mountain streams in the Idaho back country and dairy farms near Twin Falls. Microbes are all over the state of Idaho and they’re the focus of a new book on the tiny, single-celled organisms.

The book “Idaho Microbes” takes readers on a journey around the state to learn how different microbes affect day-to-day life in Idaho.

Idaho author Steve Stuebner teamed up with Boise State University scientists to write the book. He says it looks at microbes that everyone in Idaho needs to know about.

John Kelly / Boise State University

A Boise State chemistry professor has been named the 2015 Idaho Professor of the Year by two national education organizations.

Susan Shadle is among 35 state winners and the 10th Boise State professor to claim the award, which is handed out by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho is more than 82 percent white. Just 12 percent of the state is Hispanic or Latino, and less than one percent of residents are African American.

The U.S. Census numbers also say, when it comes to business, the state lacks diversity. Hispanic-owned businesses make up just 2.6 percent of firms in Idaho. African American-owned businesses are at just .2 percent.

Boise State University

The Micron Foundation has given $25 million to Boise State University for the school's materials science program.

The Idaho Statesman reports that the sum is nearly half of the cost of the Center for Materials Research, which will house the program.

This is one in a string of gifts the Micron Foundation has made to launch Boise State's materials science program, which started in 2002 and now has 177 students.

The Meeting Place North / Flickr

A Boise State professor is looking into whether an organic diet makes people healthier, and she’s crowdfunding to help pay for her research.

“This is a pretty new way, as far as I can tell, to raise research dollars,” says Cynthia Curl, an Assistant Professor of Community and Environmental Health at the university. She wants to find out if eating organic food has measurable health effects.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A local astronomer has made his crowdfunding goal and Boise will soon have an observatory again.

Elizabeth Haslam / Flickr

Sunday night will offer a chance to see the last total lunar eclipse until 2018.

This eclipse is special, says Brian Jackson, an astronomer who teaches at Boise State. That’s because it will also be what’s known as a “Blood Moon.”

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

On top of the tallest academic building on the Boise State campus sits a large metal dome. It is an observatory that has been at the school for more than 35 years. At one point, the dome was a hive of activity, giving students and the public a chance to peer deep into our solar system. Now it sits mostly empty and unused, after years of neglect.

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