Bowe Bergdahl

Gerry Broome / AP Images

Last week, a military judge decided against giving Army soldier Bowe Bergdahl a prison sentence. Even though he pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, Bergdahl was granted leniency by Army Colonel Jeffery Nance.

AP

Idaho native Bowe Bergdahl will serve no time in prison after pleading guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. The Army solider walked away from his post in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held by a group connected to the Taliban.

AP Photo/Gerry Broome

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who walked away from his post in Afghanistan and triggered a search that left some of his comrades severely wounded, was spared a prison sentence by a military judge Friday in what President Donald Trump blasted as a "complete and total disgrace."

AP Photo/Ted Richardson

A military judge on Thursday began deliberating the punishment for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl after defense attorneys asked for no prison time while prosecutors sought more than a decade behind bars.

Ted Richardson / AP

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's difficult childhood and his washout from Coast Guard boot camp stoked serious psychiatric disorders that helped spur him to walk off his remote post in Afghanistan in 2009, a psychiatrist testified Wednesday.

AP Photo/Ted Richardson

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was a "gold mine" of intelligence, helping the military better understand insurgents and how they imprison hostages, two agents testified Tuesday as defense attorneys sought to show the soldier's contributions since he was returned in a prisoner swap.

Bowe Bergdahl
Ted Richardson / AP Images

In an unexpected and emotional statement, Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl apologized in court Monday to all the military personnel who were wounded searching for him and described the daily nightmares and flashbacks to his five years in captivity of Taliban allies he still endures.

AP Photo/Ted Richardson

Soldiers and an airman described a shattered hand and a head wound Thursday as prosecutors presented evidence that Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's disappearance endangered those who searched for him.

AP Photo/Ted Richardson

Several soldiers and a Navy SEAL testified Wednesday about the risky, all-out efforts to find Bowe Bergdahl after the soldier's 2009 disappearance in Afghanistan.

Bowe Bergdahl
Ted Richardson / AP Images

The judge deciding Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's punishment said Monday he is concerned that President Donald Trump's comments about the case could impact the public's perception of the military justice system.

Daniel Hoherd / Flickr

Sentencing for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl begins Monday, October 23. The Hailey native pleaded guilty to charges of misbehavior before the enemy and desertion. In the wake of Bergdahl’s plea, soldiers involved in the manhunt for him are coming forward to tell their side of the story.

Ted Richardson / AP

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was captured and held by the Taliban for five years after walking away from his post in Afghanistan, pleaded guilty Monday to desertion and misbehavior-before-the-enemy charges that could put him behind bars for the rest of his life.

U.S. Department of Defense

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will appear in court next week to enter an expected guilty plea to charges that he endangered comrades by walking off his remote post in Afghanistan in 2009.

AP Images

Bowe Bergdahl was the only American POW in the Afghanistan War, held captive by the Taliban for five years. After he was released, the Army Sergeant – who is from Idaho – was charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.


AP Photo/Ted Richardson

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held captive by the Taliban for half a decade after abandoning his Afghanistan post, is expected to plead guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, two individuals with knowledge of the case said.

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