Bowe Bergdahl

Idaho National Guard

Lawyers for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are continuing their efforts to have the desertion case against their client dismissed because of disparaging remarks made by Donald Trump while he was campaigning for president.

Idaho National Guard

President Donald Trump's campaign-trail condemnation of Bowe Bergdahl — the army sergeant charged with desertion while serving in Afghanistan — won't prevent the soldier from getting a fair trial, according to military prosecutors.

Washington Post screenshot / YouTube

President Donald Trump's scathing criticism of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will prevent the soldier from getting a fair trial on charges he endangered comrades by walking off his post in Afghanistan, Bergdahl's attorneys said Friday.

In a motion filed shortly after Trump was sworn in, defense lawyers asked a military judge to dismiss the charges against Bergdahl and argued the Republican's comments have violated his due process rights and amount to unlawful command influence.

White House

There are only a few hours left in Barack Obama’s presidency and chances are dimming that he’ll move on two issues with ties to Idaho.

There has been speculation over the last few months of Obama’s presidency that he might create a National Monument across Idaho’s border in eastern Oregon.

AP

The federal government dropped its efforts to seize hours of unaired interviews an Oscar-winning screenwriter recorded with Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, his lawyer said Tuesday.

Mark Boal had sued the government to block a military prosecutor who threatened to subpoena 25 hours of interviews for possible use at Bergdahl's court-martial for abandoning his post in Afghanistan in 2009.

Bowe Bergdahl
Ted Richardson / AP Images

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s lawyers want President Obama to pardon their client. The attorneys filed the request earlier this month, in a last-ditch effort to get Bergdahl off the hook before a new administration takes over.

 

Military law expert Richard Rosen of the Center for Military Law and Policy says the request for a presidential pardon is the equivalent of a Hail Mary pass.  

“So I’ve not heard of a case like this, but this is a highly unusual case,” says Rosen. 

Idaho National Guard

A judge will hear more arguments Tuesday about whether injuries to soldiers on a search mission should be allowed as evidence that U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl endangered comrades by walking off his post in Afghanistan.

Prosecutors are arguing that two wounded soldiers' injuries should be allowed as evidence to show that Bergdahl's disappearance effectively put other military members in harm's way.

Bergdahl, who's from Hailey, Idaho, is charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, the latter of which carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.

Idaho National Guard

A military officer testified Monday that he saw another soldier shot in the head during the 2009 search for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who's accused of endangering his comrades when he walked off his post in Afghanistan.

The testimony came at a pretrial hearing at which an Army judge also agreed to delay Bergdahl's trial by several months until May 15, 2017.

Prosecutors are arguing that the judge should allow evidence of two wounded soldiers' injuries into the case to help them show that Bergdahl's disappearance effectively put other military members in harm's way.

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's lawyers want a military appeals court to consider whether U.S. Sen. John McCain unfairly swayed the soldier's desertion case.

They appealed Thursday to the Army Court of Criminal Appeals after the trial judge rejected their request to dismiss the charges.

McCain said last year that if Berghdahl isn't punished, his Senate Armed Services Committee would hold a hearing. Legal experts have said that McCain's comment could be seen as a threat to the careers of military officers who decide otherwise.

That’s according to the people behind the podcast “Serial,” which spent its second season exploring Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s disappearance from his base in 2009, capture by the Taliban and subsequent return to the U.S.

Ted Richardson / AP Images

A military judge has rejected efforts to dismiss the desertion case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl over comments made by U.S. Sen. John McCain.

Berdahl's lawyers argued that McCain improperly influenced the case by telling a reporter in 2015 that his Senate committee would hold a hearing if Bergdahl weren't punished.

Bergdahl walked off his post in Afghanistan in 2009 and wound up in captivity of the Taliban and its allies for five years.

He is charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. Trial is scheduled for February 2017 at Fort Bragg.

Ted Ricardson / AP Photo

 

U.S. Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl is back in court Monday as his lawyers work to get his case dismissed. The Hailey native has been charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy during his deployment to Afghanistan. 

Bergdahl’s lawyers say his case was improperly influenced by Arizona Sen. John McCain last year when he said that if the military doesn’t punish the Army sergeant, he would hold a Senate hearing on the case.

Idaho National Guard

An Oscar-winning filmmaker has asked a judge to prevent the military from forcing him to turn over interviews with Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

Attorneys for screenwriter Mark Boal filed a complaint Wednesday in a California federal court seeking to block an upcoming subpoena from North Carolina-based military prosecutors.

The complaint says the prosecutors intend to ask for unedited audio recordings of Boal's interviews with Bergdahl.

Brigitte Woosley / AP

An Army judge says prosecutors must give attorneys for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl more information about why his enlistment contract was extended while he was a captive of the Taliban and its allies.

Army Lt. Col. Frank Rosenblatt, a defense attorney, said it's not clear why the government has chosen to keep Bergdahl on active duty until 2022. He said Bergdahl was eligible for a discharge in 2011 and should have been allowed to re-enlist or leave the military upon his return from captivity.

Dept. of Defense

A military judge is delaying the start of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's military trial until February.

Col. Jeffrey Nance said during a pre-trial hearing Tuesday at Fort Bragg in North Carolina that delaying the court-martial from August should allow enough time to sort through access to classified documents by Bergdahl's defense team.

Nance also ordered military prosecutors to set up online access to court documents for news organizations covering the case of the soldier charged with desertion for leaving his combat outpost in Afghanistan and falling into Taliban hands.

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