Bowe Bergdahl

Idaho National Guard

 

 

This post was updated at 4:37 p.m. on May 31, 2014.

President Barack Obama is welcoming the release of the lone U.S. solider held in Afghanistan, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

There is mixed news this week on the fate of American prisoner of war Bowe Bergdahl. The Associated Press is reporting efforts to bring home the Northwest soldier are in disarray.

Idaho National Guard

The captors of an American soldier held for nearly five years in Afghanistan have signaled a willingness to release him but are unclear which U.S. government officials have the authority to make a deal.

That's according to a U.S. defense official and a military officer working for the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl

Critics of the release effort blame disorganization and poor communication among the numerous U.S. agencies involved. A defense official says about two dozen officials at the State and Defense departments, the military, the CIA and FBI are working on the case.

The case of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl  — who's been held by the Taliban since 2009 — has arisen again as the U.S. and other countries engage in diplomatic efforts to free him.

But if he's released, will America's only prisoner of the Afghan war be viewed as a hero or a deserter?

Some people are convinced that on June 30, 2009, just a few months after he arrived in Afghanistan, Bergdahl willingly walked away from his unit in Paktika province.

Bergdahl — who's from Idaho — was last seen in a video the Taliban released in December.

The spokesman for Afghanistan's Taliban says they have suspended "mediation" with the United States to exchange captive U.S. soldier Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five senior Taliban prisoners held in U.S. custody in Guantanamo Bay.

In a terse emailed statement Sunday, Zabihullah Mujahed blamed the "current complex political situation in the country" for the suspension of what was considered the best chance of securing Bergdahl's freedom since his capture in 2009. It is the first official acknowledgement of indirect talks with the U.S. to free Bergdahl.

Paul McCartney
American Soldier Network

U.S. diplomats are reportedly renewing their efforts to arrange a prisoner swap for Idaho soldier Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl who's been in Taliban captivity nearly five years. Bergdahl would be exchanged for five Taliban detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

U.S. Sweetens Prisoner Swap Deal To Free Idaho POW Bowe Bergdahl

Feb 18, 2014
Dept. of Defense

The Washington Post reports the Obama administration is working on a possible prisoner swap with the Taliban in order to free Idaho prisoner of war Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. According to the Post, U.S. officials are prepared to release five members of the Afghan Taliban imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Idaho POW's Family Reacts To New 'Proof Of Life' Video

Jan 15, 2014
Idaho National Guard

Here's the latest update from The Associated Press, 5:20 p.m. 

The Idaho family of captured U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is renewing their call for his release after the seeing a new video of him.

U.S. officials say they believe the video was taken within the last month, showing that the soldier is alive after nearly five years of captivity.

A senior defense official said the video came to light several days ago. Another official said that Bergdahl appeared in poorer health than previous videos.

IntelCenter

Supporters of a captured soldier from Idaho are urging people to add one more name to their holiday mailing list. Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has been a prisoner of the Taliban since 2009.

Now, organizers in his hometown of Hailey, Idaho are trying to get Christmas cards to him.

It's been four-and-a-half years since Bowe Bergdahl was captured near his base in southeast Afghanistan. The now 27-year-old is still believed alive, but so far there's end in sight for his captivity.

IntelCenter

A U.S. drone attack has reportedly killed the militant commander believed to be holding Idaho soldier Bowe Bergdahl captive. That's according to news reports out of Pakistan. The strike dealt a blow to the Taliban-affiliated Haqqani  Network.

Bowe Bergdahl
Jessica Robinson

Supporters of an Idaho soldier being held by the Taliban are trying to keep his name front and center with the public. Bowe Bergdahl of Hailey has been a prisoner of war for the last four years. Supporters are using billboards to publicize his captivity.

Keith Lasseigne motions to the roof of a building in downtown Spokane. “We have a Bring Bowe Home billboard above us.”

Idaho National Guard

Four years. That's how long Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has been a prisoner of the Taliban. The soldier from Hailey remains the lone American POW from the Afghan conflict. Now, Bergdahl's parents are calling on the U.S. to reach an agreement that will bring their son home. But any deal hangs precariously on peace talks involving the Taliban, and the weekend saw yet another setback.

The parents of America's only prisoner of war in the current conflict in Afghanistan are urging the U.S. to reach a peace agreement with the Taliban and bring their son home. The end of June marks the fourth year Idaho soldier Bowe Bergdahl has been in captivity.

On Saturday his parents spoke out at a rally Bowe's hometown held in his honor.

Jani and Bob Bergdahl talk of a son who sought adventure in travels around the world. At 20, they say, he took apart and rebuilt his 1978 KZ-1000 motorcycle.

Yellow ribbons and black prisoner-of-war flags are lining the streets in Hailey, Idaho today. The town is preparing to honor captured soldier Bowe Bergdahl.

The 27-year-old Army sergeant has been a prisoner of the Taliban for almost four years. Family and friends are getting ready for what they hope will be the biggest and last local rally to bring Bergdahl home.

Members of a POW support group mount flags along Hailey's Main Street. Donna Thibedeau-Eddy has traveled here from Pocatello, Idaho, to participate in the Bergdahl event.

IntelCenter

News that the Taliban is open to a prisoner swap is bringing renewed hope to supporters of a captive soldier from the Northwest.

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