Brian Cronin

Shelby Zepeda / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho voters sent a clear message to policymakers when they struck down a trio of education laws last November. Those laws known as “Students Come First” would have increased technology in classrooms, limited collective bargaining rights for teachers and more.

Emilie Ritter-Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

For some the most important thing on Idaho’s November ballot is not a candidate but three referenda. They ask voters to keep or reject the state’s 2011 education laws known as Students Come First.

Tuesday, at Boise’s City Club, schools’ superintendent Tom Luna, the laws’ champion, had a fiery exchange with state Representative Brian Cronin, one of the most prominent critics.

An audience question at the forum revealed the political philosophy behind parts of Students Come First. Superintendent Luna was asked if the rift between him and the state’s teachers could be healed.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

The state of Idaho will give up an estimated $845 million this year in the form of tax credits and exemptions.  And only a select few at the Idaho Tax Commission know exactly where that money goes.

Session Wrap: Democrat’s ‘IJOBS’ Fails, Again

Apr 5, 2012
Betsy Russell / Spokesman Review

Democrats in the Idaho Legislature again offered a slate of bills they said would boost economic growth and add jobs to the economy.

They dubbed it ‘IJOBS’, and it’s not the first time they’ve attempted to get similar measures through.  Democrats introduced the first round of IJOBS bills back in 2010.  They all failed.