Chobani

Chobani, Greek Yogurt
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The Food and Drug Administration reports at least 89 people have reported getting sick after eating Chobani Greek yogurt manufactured in Twin Falls, Idaho.

FDA spokeswoman Tamara Ward told The Times-News on Monday that some have described nausea and cramps.

No link has been confirmed between the illnesses and the yogurt. However, Ward says the FDA is working with Chobani to hasten its voluntary recall.

TOrebelxTguy / Flickr Creative Commons

Yogurt maker Chobani says the mold that triggered a recall of some of its Greek yogurt cups this week is not associated with foodborne illnesses like salmonella or E. coli.

The company identified the mold Friday as a common species that usually affects fruits, vegetables and other plants. It has also been linked to previous cases of spoiled yogurt.

Cornell University Professor Randy Worobo says the mold "should not pose a health risk to most consumers." Worobo is a professor of food science.

TBiley / Flickr Creative Commons

Yogurt maker Chobani notified stores over the weekend to pull potentially spoiled product from its shelves, but a Costco representative said the company received reports from retailers about tainted product two or three weeks ago.

Craig Wilson is vice president of quality assurance for Costco Wholesale Corp. He told The Times-News that Costco pulled Chobani yogurt manufactured in Twin Falls from its shelves in the San Francisco Bay area and the Northwest region weeks ago and is only accepting yogurt from the company's East Coast plant.

Chobani
Provisions / Flickr Creative Commons

Yogurt maker Chobani says it has pulled products from stores following reports of yogurt that didn't remain fresh as long as it should have.

The Idaho Statesman reports a check of Fred Meyer, Albertson's and Winco stores on Saturday in the Boise area found that Chobani yogurt had been removed.

It's unclear if the removal extends to other states, where customers reported bad yogurt.

Chobani on its website says it took action after hearing what the company called isolated quality concerns with certain cups of yogurt.

Chobani, Greek Yogurt
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

New York based Greek yogurt maker Chobani has been chosen to lead a new pilot program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That program will feature the high protein yogurt in school lunches starting this school year.

Idaho, along with Arizona, New York and Tennessee will participate to see how cost effective it will be to offer this yogurt as a meat substitute for school meals.  If the test is successful, Greek yogurt could become a permanent fixture of the school lunch program across the U.S.  

Chobani, Greek Yogurt
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho is one of four states that will participate in a program to offer Greek yogurt as a meat substitute in meals served at public schools.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Monday announced it was taking bids through July 22 to supply orders for schools in Idaho, Arizona, New York and Tennessee.

The USDA decided in January to classify Greek yogurt as an accepted meat alternative because of its high protein content. If the pilot program succeeds, Greek yogurt could become a permanent part of the school lunch program nationwide.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo toured the Chobani yogurt plant in Twin Falls Tuesday. Along with Chobani executives and agricultural leaders, Crapo hopes that soon school children in Idaho and around the country will be eating more Greek yogurt.

Crapo says the USDA may add Chobani yogurt as an option on school menus. He says the department is considering a pilot program in four states that would bring the protein-rich dairy product to kids this fall. This could mean more Chobani jobs in Idaho.

Chobani, Greek Yogurt
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

In November 2011, the New York-based Greek yogurt maker Chobani announced plans to build a multimillion dollar manufacturing facility in Twin Falls, Idaho, with plans to hire 400 people.

Today, 13 months later, Chobani’s Twin Falls facility hosted its grand opening. New numbers show the yogurt maker hired fewer people than expected, and collected more subsidies than first reported.

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