Climate Change

Idaho Capitol Dome
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

An Idaho Senate panel voted to retain all references to man-made climate change in proposed science standards for K-12 education, which could end a three-year fight over the rules.

Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho state senators are digesting public opinion backing proposed science standards for public schools that include several references to man made climate change.

Idaho Capitol Dome
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

An Idaho House committee eliminated several references to human-caused climate change and renewable energy in proposed public school science standards Wednesday, but still preserved some mention of them.

U.S. Dept. of Education / Flickr Creative Commons

Students, teachers and lobbyists testified overwhelmingly in support Friday of proposed changes to Idaho’s educational science standards.

Jeremy Erickson / Flickr Creative Commons

The Treasure Valley’s verdant tree canopy gives the capital city more than just its nickname. According to a new report by the Treasure Valley Canopy Network, trees are one of our best tools in fighting back against climate change locally.

Senate Chamber Idaho Capitol
Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

New K-12 science standards received push back from Idaho lawmakers for the third year in a row on Thursday, despite continued efforts to downplay the negative impacts of human activity on climate change to appease Republican members.

Ted S. Warren / AP Images

The first Idaho Climate Summit wraps up Friday in Boise. Keynote speaker Kate Gordon set the tone for the two-day event Thursday morning, making an economic case for Idahoans to heed the signs of climate change.

Skytech Solar / Flickr Creative Commons

This week, the Sierra Club released a list of cities around the country that have made a commitment to green energy. Among them are bigger metros like Atlanta and Portland – as well as smaller cities like Pueblo and Boulder, Colorado. Nearby Salt Lake City also made the cut.

ITD

Wildfires in the west have become more common and gobble up more acres of land than in the past – but charred homes and forests may not be the only damage left behind. Waterways may also be at risk.

Climate March
Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

This past winter Southern Idaho experienced one of its snowiest and coldest on record. So we can’t be blamed for wanting to look ahead into the summer. But one organization wants us to look back again.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Both of Idaho’s senators counseled President Donald Trump in his decision to leave the Paris Climate Accord. Senators Jim Risch and Mike Crapo both pushed for Trump to leave the international agreement.

Crapo and Risch were among 22 senators who wrote a letter to the Trump Administration ahead of yesterday’s decision urging the President to step away from the accord, which was ratified by 195 countries.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A group of researchers, led by Boise State University, picked up $1.7 million Monday to study how climate change affects birds.

The grant comes from the Department of Defense. Led by BSU biological sciences professor Julie Heath, the team will use some of the money to study how climate change is affecting the migration of American kestrels, North America’s smallest falcon species.

Idaho March for Science Facebook

Thousands plan to attend the national March for Science that takes place Saturday in Washington D.C. In Boise, Austin Hopkins is one of the people planning an Idaho version of the march.

Hopkins -- who is with Idaho Conservation League -- hopes Saturday’s march furthers a dialogue between politics and science in Idaho.

ap

A conservation group has created maps identifying key landscapes in three Western states most likely to sustain native species amid climate change and is distributing money to protect private lands in those areas through use-limiting easements or outright purchases.

The Nature Conservancy says it has $6 million from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation that it's now distributing among land trusts that must come up with five times the amount in matching funds for approved easements or acquisitions.

Daniel Weber / Flickr Creative Commons

An Idaho Senate panel has agreed to exclude several references to climate change in the state's newest proposed science standards.

The standards haven't been updated since 2001 and have been criticized as vague. The House Education Committee sparked controversy earlier this month by removing several key mentions to climate change and human impact on the environment from the proposed standards. The amended rules needed to be adopted by the Senate panel in order to be implemented.

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