Closed primary

Boise State Public Radio

Voters have until the end of the day Friday to change their party registration with their county clerk. After that, they’re stuck with that party when the state primary rolls around on May 17.

Voters who took part in Tuesday's GOP Presidential Primary could decide at the polls to become a Republican. But that’s not how it works for this spring's state primary. Voters have to choose now whether to list themselves as Republican, Democrat or anything else.

In a closely watched Democratic race, Branden Durst beat Matthew Duncan Tuesday night in South Boise’s District 18.  Durst and Duncan are against the public education reform laws known as Students Come First or what Democrats call the “Luna laws.” They both are for ethics reform, and against requiring an ultrasound before an abortion.  But Durst does have a four-year history in the Idaho Legislature.  

Three sitting judges will keep their seats after running unopposed in Tuesday's primary.  For those who voted the unaffiliated ballot, their only choice was to vote for Supreme Court Justice Dan Eismann  and Appellate Court Judges David Gratton and John Melanson.  A few people chose the unaffiliated ballot than the Democratic or Republican one. That could be a problem, says Gary Moncrief.  The political science professor at Boise State says fewer people are likely to vote for judges than in the other races.