Culture

ITD

The agency that oversees Idaho's highways spent part of Tuesday taking a trip down Memory Lane.

The Idaho Transportation Department opened a time capsule buried in Boise in 1989. The 3-foot piece of conduit had been glued shut and buried near the department's East Annex. The burial was part of a dedication of a grove of trees given to the state by the University of Idaho.

The contents included newspapers of the era, license plates, advertisements and more.

The Native American Music Awards recognize indigenous musicians from the U.S., Canada and Latin America. It is considered to be the Grammys of Native American music.

HBO is planning a new six-hour miniseries on the Lewis and Clark expedition.

stonebraker
University of Idaho Library

William Allen Stonebraker worked and played in the rugged central Idaho wilderness at the turn of the 20th century and he's left behind a unique legacy of photographs to tell his story. That photo collection has just been released by the University of Idaho Library.

A group in the Boise area is in the midst of fundraising for a new attraction in the Northwest. It'll be called the Northwest Science Museum.

Friends of the Bishop's House

A house that was once home to Episcopal Bishops and nurses, and was saved from demolition is celebrating its 125th year.

The Bishop’s House was built in 1889 and is one of Boise's oldest continuously-used buildings. It was remodeled 10 years later by well-known Idaho architect John Tourtellotte. He added several rooms, a three-story tower and a wrap-around porch which helped create the unique silhouette of the home.  

Event Offers A Rare Glimpse Into Life For Boise Refugees

Sep 18, 2014
IRC, refugees
Jodie Martinson / Boise State Public Radio

If you've wondered what life is like for Boise refugees, a local organization has put together a unique event offering a rare chance to walk in the shoes of a new Idaho refugee.

New York Times screengrab

If you were born in Idaho, The New York Times reports you've likely stayed put. And if you did move, it was more likely you stayed in the West.  

ranching, cattle, trough
Julie Rose / For Boise State Public Radio

In a couple of weeks, Logan Alder will marry his girlfriend and move into a small house on the family ranch in Malad, Idaho. In another year, he’ll have an agriculture degree from Utah State University. But right now, he’s just a 25-year-old kid, knee-deep in muck.

Mud regularly builds up on the bottom of this large watering trough in a field where Alder’s keeping some of his 500 cattle. Usually a spigot keeps the trough full so muck can’t build up as easily. But lately, the well underneath is running so low the spigot merely sputters.

Football season has kicked off another round of scrutiny over how professional sports teams use Native American mascots. But in eastern Washington, a minor league baseball team has earned the approval of its native namesake.

Avista Stadium in Spokane is full of the familiar sights, sounds and smells of baseball. And then, there are things that might make you do a double take.

Re-branding in two languages

Are You A Native Idahoan? Data Show Most Idaho Residents Aren't

Aug 15, 2014
New York Times screengrab

An interesting take on state-to-state migration from The New York Times illustrates what many Idahoans already knew: a lot of California natives now live in Idaho.

The Times created a data visualization of migration to each state going back to 1900. It's no surprise that at the turn of the 20th century, most people moving to Idaho were immigrants from outside of the U.S., the northeast and the midwest.

Are These 10 Stereotypes About Boise Really True? You Decide

Jul 31, 2014
Boise, downtown, city, moon
Charles Knowles / Flickr Creative Commons

A blogger at the real estate site Movoto asserts there are 10 stereotypes that accurately describe the people of Boise. The blogger says Boiseans secretly think they're better than other Idahoans, that Boiseans are music snobs, and Boiseans can't complain enough about the summer heat.

Is he right?

What Are The Sounds That Make Your Idaho City Home?

Jul 24, 2014
river, boise, floaters, recreation
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

On a hot summer day, the sounds that echo through Boise State Public Radio's windows along the Boise River are the shrieks and squeals of floaters drifting downstream.

A mini-rapid is right in front of the newsroom, and it's at that spot where floaters tend to get a healthy dose of cold river water. Their giggles, shock-induced screams, and mild expletives mixed with the constant churn of fast-moving water, are a lovely reminder of summer in Boise. It's a sound that likely defines Boise.

Idahoans And Iowans Join Forces To End State Mix-Up

Jul 14, 2014
Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho and Iowa are, in fact, two different states, and entrepreneurs, writers and creative-types want the world to learn the difference. (Take our quiz to see how well you know Idaho and Iowa.)

International Market, Boise, food
Photo Courtesy International Market

The Boise International Market is set to open its doors sometime in August. It will start out with 17 micro-businesses selling products from around the world. Developers hope to add more vendors soon after it opens.

Kate Grosswiler / for Boise State Public Radio

Like a lot of people, Anne McDonald’s basement is a bit cluttered. But it’s safe to say the things strewn about are a little more interesting than your average basement clutter.

“This is Prudence, the rhinestoned and feathered rubber chicken who has a removable head," says McDonald. "And it’s kind of bloody because she’s been used a couple of times on stage.”

Turns Out, Idaho Is A Really Good Place For 'Nerds'

Apr 25, 2014
Estately Blog

Idaho is a good place to be if you're into science fiction, comic books, and LARP-ing (that's live-action role playing). A lighthearted post from the blog Estately, and picked up by CNET, shows Idaho is the fourth 'nerdiest' (their word, not ours) state in the country.

Adam Dressler

Do you sometimes feel like you have too much stuff cluttering up your life?  Can 20 pairs of shoes really make you happy? Two Northwest authors say maybe not. 

Joshua Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus are childhood best friends who had normal, 20-something lives.  They had good jobs, homes, cars, clothes, and gadgets. But one day they figured out all that stuff wasn’t making them happy. So they got rid of it. Now they live simply in Montana, and travel the country spreading the word of Minimalism.

Are you streaming music right now? If you're in America's Pacific region, there's a much better chance you're nodding along with Cat Power rather than grooving to Fantasia, which you'd be more likely to be doing if you were across the country in the South Atlantic. Those observations come from a map titled "Regionalisms in U.S. Listening Preferences."

Henry's Fork, Island Park, scenic, Idaho
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho's nearly 84,000 square miles of breathtaking views, rugged terrain, and unique landmarks mean the Gem State is rife with recreation and site-seeing options. It could take a lifetime to see it all. In the spirit of the new year, we've compiled a list of the 75 things you must experience in Idaho -- at least once.

Consider this list a starting place for your own Idaho bucket list. By no means is this a definitive list. Send us more Idaho must-dos using the hashtag #IDbucketlist.

75. Bike the Hiawatha Trail.

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