Eclipse

Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

If you live here in Idaho, it’s hard to miss stories about Monday’s upcoming eclipse of the sun. For several months, we’ve been visiting the towns and cities along the path of totality. Here we check-in with officials in Stanley, who are concerned about the crowds expected this weekend.

Kelly Stribling / Boise State Public Radio

Many Idahoans will be looking up to the sky next Monday for the total solar eclipse. But what about animals? How will the natural world react?


Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The eclipse is now less than a week away. As anticipation builds for this once-in-a-lifetime solar spectacle, logistical realities are setting in. Communities in the path of totality are expecting to be swarmed and are preparing for hordes of people.


St. Luke's Health System

St. Luke’s Health System is using a music video spoof to remind people to protect their eyes during the upcoming solar eclipse.


Tim / Flickr

If you’re renting out a room in your house or a camping spot in your backyard, you have to pay taxes on that.


With the 2017 total solar eclipse less than two weeks away, excitement is reaching a fever pitch in Idaho and other places across the country where this stunning celestial event will be visible.

Katy Mersmann / NASA

In the latest installment of our news experiment, we wanted to know what you've been wondering about the August 21 solar eclipse in Idaho. We got a lot of great questions, and because this is a once-in-a-lifetime event, Samantha Wright decided to answer all 17 of them.

AP Images

As the solar eclipse is now just days away, many people have already planned where they’ll watch it in Idaho. But what’s your plan for photographing the phenomenon?


Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho is prime viewing for the August 21 total solar eclipse. While the majority of people are excited to experience this once-in-a-lifetime event, the eclipse has a very narrow segment of the population worried.

 

Jerry Mathes

The August 21 total solar eclipse is less than three weeks away. Towns around Idaho are expecting big crowds of people coming from all over the world to watch the moon cross in front of the sun. Unofficial estimates run as high as 250,000 visitors flooding into the Gem State.

The two-minute blackout is an event that appeals to people for many reasons. Some are coming to be part of a once in a lifetime event. Others are interested in astronomy. What is it about the eclipse that could motivate a quarter million people to come here?

Idaho Department of Fish and Game

So you came all the way to Idaho to watch the total solar eclipse on August 21. Now that the two-minute event is over, what do you do next?

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game suggests why not go fishing?

You've seen plenty of maps of the path the eclipse will take over Idaho. This new map from IDFG shows the best places to see the eclipse, and the 60 closest fishing spots nearby. The map covers the path of totality, the line of complete blockage of the sun by the moon.

AP

The total solar eclipse set to pass through Idaho on August 21 is conflicting with school schedules throughout the state. Educators are trying to determine if they should cancel classes, have a regular school day or, in some cases, move the first day of school.

Today Show

Idaho has been preparing for the Aug. 21 eclipse for years.

Boxun Zhang / Flickr

Next week, Blaine County Commissioners will review an application for an eclipse-watching camp in the Wood River Valley that could accommodate up to 3,000 solar spectators.

The organizer has christened what could spring up on a 13-acre vacant lot in Hailey “EclipCity.” The temporary campground would have 832 spaces measuring 20 by 20 feet that would be available for an estimated $350 a spot.

courtesy of the artist and Dolby Chadwick Gallery, S.F.

Idaho cities in the path of the total solar eclipse on August 21 are preparing to host hundreds of viewing parties. Some cities are more accustomed to welcoming tourists, like Sun Valley. 

Courtney Gilbert, from the Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Ketchum, explained, "Hotels started selling out about two years ago. The city of Ketchum is partnering with the city of Sun Valley to organize a day of activities that will take place in Festival Meadows."

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