Eclipse

Yellowstone National Park / Flickr

Although Craters Of The Moon National Monument in the eastern part of the state wasn’t directly in the path of totality, the otherworldly landscape proved a popular destination with eclipse-watchers. The monument near Arco saw a record amount of visitors and made a big announcement.


Larry Goto

A Nampa man is out more than $20,000 after he set up an epic solar eclipse festival that an underwhelming amount of people showed up to.

KIVI-TV reported Tuesday that Jeff Webb's eclipse festival in Cascade was complete with campsites, shuttles for parking, eight live bands, portable toilets and food for thousands of people. Webb spent nearly $7,000 on portable toilets alone.

But to his surprise, only a few dozen eclipse enthusiasts showed up.

Kevin Bean

Monday’s total solar eclipse dazzled viewers in Idaho and across the nation. In the Gem State, crowds and traffic were predicted to reach astronomical levels, but – thankfully – the influx of visitors and vehicles remained manageable, for the most part.

One of the most picturesque and popular places to watch the eclipse in Idaho was Stanley. Perched in the Sawtooth Mountains, the tiny town was told to brace for 20,000 eclipse watchers coming in for the event. However, Stanley City Councilman Steve Botti says the town probably got closer to 10,000 visitors.


Maddie Mathes

After 14 hours in a car, and a long weekend camping in the Idaho wilderness, author and former wildland firefighter Jerry Mathes says it was all worth it.

“It was the most amazing thing I’ve seen in nature, really,” Mathes said.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Monday's solar eclipse was at about 99 percent of totality in Boise. About 250 people in the Capital City took in the unique experience at the top of Table Rock. Some set up their chairs and blankets on the east side of the hilltop, facing the Boise River Wildlife Management Area as the moon slowly moved across the sun.

Robert Davies / Flickr

With the total eclipse just a few days away and many people arriving or in the state already on their way to where they plan to watch the solar spectacle, cloud cover could make or break watching the show in the sky. We have a look at Eclipse Monday’s forecast.


Roadsidepictures / Flickr

As luck would have it, many of the small towns scattered across Idaho in the path of totality for this Monday’s solar eclipse are only accessible by small, two-lane roads. We’ve got some tips for those driving to watch day turn to night.


Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

If you live here in Idaho, it’s hard to miss stories about Monday’s upcoming eclipse of the sun. For several months, we’ve been visiting the towns and cities along the path of totality. Here we check-in with officials in Stanley, who are concerned about the crowds expected this weekend.

Kelly Stribling / Boise State Public Radio

Many Idahoans will be looking up to the sky next Monday for the total solar eclipse. But what about animals? How will the natural world react?


Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The eclipse is now less than a week away. As anticipation builds for this once-in-a-lifetime solar spectacle, logistical realities are setting in. Communities in the path of totality are expecting to be swarmed and are preparing for hordes of people.


St. Luke's Health System

St. Luke’s Health System is using a music video spoof to remind people to protect their eyes during the upcoming solar eclipse.


Tim / Flickr

If you’re renting out a room in your house or a camping spot in your backyard, you have to pay taxes on that.


With the 2017 total solar eclipse less than two weeks away, excitement is reaching a fever pitch in Idaho and other places across the country where this stunning celestial event will be visible.

Katy Mersmann / NASA

In the latest installment of our news experiment, we wanted to know what you've been wondering about the August 21 solar eclipse in Idaho. We got a lot of great questions, and because this is a once-in-a-lifetime event, Samantha Wright decided to answer all 17 of them.

AP Images

As the solar eclipse is now just days away, many people have already planned where they’ll watch it in Idaho. But what’s your plan for photographing the phenomenon?


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