Eclipse

Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho is prime viewing for the August 21 total solar eclipse. While the majority of people are excited to experience this once-in-a-lifetime event, the eclipse has a very narrow segment of the population worried.

 

Jerry Mathes

The August 21 total solar eclipse is less than three weeks away. Towns around Idaho are expecting big crowds of people coming from all over the world to watch the moon cross in front of the sun. Unofficial estimates run as high as 250,000 visitors flooding into the Gem State.

The two-minute blackout is an event that appeals to people for many reasons. Some are coming to be part of a once in a lifetime event. Others are interested in astronomy. What is it about the eclipse that could motivate a quarter million people to come here?

Idaho Department of Fish and Game

So you came all the way to Idaho to watch the total solar eclipse on August 21. Now that the two-minute event is over, what do you do next?

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game suggests why not go fishing?

You've seen plenty of maps of the path the eclipse will take over Idaho. This new map from IDFG shows the best places to see the eclipse, and the 60 closest fishing spots nearby. The map covers the path of totality, the line of complete blockage of the sun by the moon.

AP

The total solar eclipse set to pass through Idaho on August 21 is conflicting with school schedules throughout the state. Educators are trying to determine if they should cancel classes, have a regular school day or, in some cases, move the first day of school.

Today Show

Idaho has been preparing for the Aug. 21 eclipse for years.

Boxun Zhang / Flickr

Next week, Blaine County Commissioners will review an application for an eclipse-watching camp in the Wood River Valley that could accommodate up to 3,000 solar spectators.

The organizer has christened what could spring up on a 13-acre vacant lot in Hailey “EclipCity.” The temporary campground would have 832 spaces measuring 20 by 20 feet that would be available for an estimated $350 a spot.

courtesy of the artist and Dolby Chadwick Gallery, S.F.

Idaho cities in the path of the total solar eclipse on August 21 are preparing to host hundreds of viewing parties. Some cities are more accustomed to welcoming tourists, like Sun Valley. 

Courtney Gilbert, from the Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Ketchum, explained, "Hotels started selling out about two years ago. The city of Ketchum is partnering with the city of Sun Valley to organize a day of activities that will take place in Festival Meadows."

Gary O. Grimm / Flickr Creative Commons

The gymnasium at Park School in Weiser is full of third, fourth and fifth-grade students. Standing next to the stage, Principal Angela Halvorson introduces Assistant Professor Brian Jackson from Boise State University.

“And he is going to talk to us all about this cool thing that’s coming, the total solar eclipse. Can you please give him a round of applause . . . "

Jackson is traveling around Idaho this summer to talk to kids and adults about the eclipse.

The Exploratorium / NASA

Most hotels and campgrounds in Idaho along the path of the total solar eclipse this August have been sold out for months if not years. But one group still has campsites available near Stanley. They plan to stream the eclipse to those who can’t make it into the backcountry.

Nicholas D. / Flickr

Washington County Commissioners passed an emergency declaration ahead of what many think will be a massive influx of visitors for August's solar eclipse.

The town of Weiser has a little over 5,000 residents. The tiny community on the Oregon border could swell up to six times that size during the third weekend in August which will culminate in a total eclipse Monday, August 21.  

The Exploratorium / NASA

Tens of thousands of people will watch the total solar eclipse in Idaho on August 21, and some of them will be taking part in a citizen science experiment.

The Citizen Continental-America Telescope Eclipse Experiment, or CATE for short, is a project by the National Solar Observatory. Using special telescopes, the plan is to record the eclipse at more than 68 different sites, including three in Idaho.

Kim Nilsson / Flickr

Ahead of August’s total solar eclipse which will pass through Idaho, the state’s Department of Commerce is launching a website to help eclipse watchers coming to the Gem State.

Anywhere from 500,000 to a million people are expected to descend on Idaho this August to watch the once-in-a-lifetime spectacle of day turning to night as the moon blots out the sun.

Bernd Thaller / Flickr

Any other year, August 21 would be just another day, but this year a once-in-a-lifetime event falls on the date. A total solar eclipse will cross the continental U.S., and Idaho is one of the best places to view it. Four months out, lodgings for visitors are scarce.

With the path of totality cutting directly through the Gem State, eclipse enthusiasts from around the world will descend on Idaho.

Google and www.eclipse2017.org

It’s a big deal. That’s what one Boise State University professor says about this summer’s total solar eclipse. He's raising money online to help towns and cities prepare for an influx of people hoping to see the eclipse.

Physics professor Brian Jackson says campsites and hotels are already booked up for August 21 across the eclipse path in Idaho. He says Idaho is centrally located for prime eclipse watching.

NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory

Next August, eclipse-chasers will converge in Idaho and a handful of other states to watch the first total solar eclipse to cross the continental United States in 38 years. The Boise State Physics Department is getting ready with a special talk Friday.

The last total solar eclipse that crossed the continental U.S. was in 1979 and it crossed over Northern Idaho. This time, the path for best eclipse viewing will travel through the middle of Idaho, just north of Boise.

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