Eclipse

Gary O. Grimm / Flickr Creative Commons

The gymnasium at Park School in Weiser is full of third, fourth and fifth-grade students. Standing next to the stage, Principal Angela Halvorson introduces Assistant Professor Brian Jackson from Boise State University.

“And he is going to talk to us all about this cool thing that’s coming, the total solar eclipse. Can you please give him a round of applause . . . "

Jackson is traveling around Idaho this summer to talk to kids and adults about the eclipse.

The Exploratorium / NASA

Most hotels and campgrounds in Idaho along the path of the total solar eclipse this August have been sold out for months if not years. But one group still has campsites available near Stanley. They plan to stream the eclipse to those who can’t make it into the backcountry.

Nicholas D. / Flickr

Washington County Commissioners passed an emergency declaration ahead of what many think will be a massive influx of visitors for August's solar eclipse.

The town of Weiser has a little over 5,000 residents. The tiny community on the Oregon border could swell up to six times that size during the third weekend in August which will culminate in a total eclipse Monday, August 21.  

The Exploratorium / NASA

Tens of thousands of people will watch the total solar eclipse in Idaho on August 21, and some of them will be taking part in a citizen science experiment.

The Citizen Continental-America Telescope Eclipse Experiment, or CATE for short, is a project by the National Solar Observatory. Using special telescopes, the plan is to record the eclipse at more than 68 different sites, including three in Idaho.

Kim Nilsson / Flickr

Ahead of August’s total solar eclipse which will pass through Idaho, the state’s Department of Commerce is launching a website to help eclipse watchers coming to the Gem State.

Anywhere from 500,000 to a million people are expected to descend on Idaho this August to watch the once-in-a-lifetime spectacle of day turning to night as the moon blots out the sun.

Bernd Thaller / Flickr

Any other year, August 21 would be just another day, but this year a once-in-a-lifetime event falls on the date. A total solar eclipse will cross the continental U.S., and Idaho is one of the best places to view it. Four months out, lodgings for visitors are scarce.

With the path of totality cutting directly through the Gem State, eclipse enthusiasts from around the world will descend on Idaho.

Google and www.eclipse2017.org

It’s a big deal. That’s what one Boise State University professor says about this summer’s total solar eclipse. He's raising money online to help towns and cities prepare for an influx of people hoping to see the eclipse.

Physics professor Brian Jackson says campsites and hotels are already booked up for August 21 across the eclipse path in Idaho. He says Idaho is centrally located for prime eclipse watching.

NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory

Next August, eclipse-chasers will converge in Idaho and a handful of other states to watch the first total solar eclipse to cross the continental United States in 38 years. The Boise State Physics Department is getting ready with a special talk Friday.

The last total solar eclipse that crossed the continental U.S. was in 1979 and it crossed over Northern Idaho. This time, the path for best eclipse viewing will travel through the middle of Idaho, just north of Boise.

Northwest Residents Observe 'Ring of Fire'

May 21, 2012
Amelia Templeton

Something called a Ring of Fire eclipse happened last night, but only a limited part of Earth’s population was in a position to see it. Millions of people in Asia enjoyed the rare light show in which the moon blocked all of the sun’s light except a flaming ring. Then the phenomenon moved on to the western U.S., where a handful of cities were directly below the moon’s shadow. Earthfix caught up with the eclipse near the border of Oregon and California. 

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