Economy

This interview was originally broadcast in June, 2017.

In recent years, the powerful and at times unexpected impacts of globalization have sent shock waves through our country’s political, economic and social systems. The promise that open trade and investment would bring new jobs, economic growth and price stability has not materialized for many Americans, who have seen their standard of living stagnate or diminish. At the same time, there is widespread disagreement about what our country needs to do to more effectively compete in the current global marketplace.

Boise, downtown, city, moon
Charles Knowles / Flickr Creative Commons

Forbes is out with a fresh list highlighting the Best States for Business and Idaho is – near-ish the top? The Gem State comes in at 20 on the list, sandwiched between Massachusetts and Missouri.

Chobani

The Greek yogurt juggernaut Chobani has rebranded as the company moves into its second decade on the market. Chobani opened its Twin Falls plant in 2012, becoming the largest yogurt facility in the world. The plant employs 1,000 people who earn an average of $15 an hour.

dcJohn / Flickr

The cost of the traditional Thanksgiving meal is down. Food prices are at the lowest level in five years.

Let’s start with the turkey. The cost of a bird this year is down 2 cents per pound, making for a going rate of about $1.40 per pound. According to the American Farm Bureau, the cost of a big, beautiful 16-pound turkey is $22.38.

Interfaith Sanctuary

Homeless families in Boise face a challenge each day as overnight shelters close, leaving parents with small children on the street. Now one shelter is opening its doors during the day, to help both kids and parents.


This interview was originally broadcast in May, 2017.

The decades after World War II were a golden age when many people around the world enjoyed an increasingly good quality of life. But by the early 1970s, the good times had all but vanished as energy shortages, financial crises and rising unemployment shook economies in America and around the world.

potatoes
Kris Krug / Flickr Creative Commons

Wildfire smoke challenged the state’s potato crop this year as hazy skies blunted direct sunlight this summer. According to the Twin Falls Times-News, farmers dealt with weather extremes on both ends of the spectrum. An unusually wet and snowy start to the year saturated the soil, forcing later planting days in the spring.

Andrew Harnik / AP Images

It might not be Halloween yet, but according to the Idaho Statesman – it’s probably time to make your Christmas tree plans.

Rob DeGraff / Flickr Creative Commons

If you thought last January was rough, just imagine being a vineyard owner in the Snake River Valley.

drought, field, agriculture
Molly Messick / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho may be known as the potato state – and there’s good reason for it. On a per capita basis, the state generates the most money from agriculture out of any western state.


billandkent / Flickr Creative Commons

Boise Weekly reports McCall is facing a shortage of seasonal workers to staff its hotels and restaurants this summer.

Gary O. Grimm / Flickr Creative Commons

The gymnasium at Park School in Weiser is full of third, fourth and fifth-grade students. Standing next to the stage, Principal Angela Halvorson introduces Assistant Professor Brian Jackson from Boise State University.

“And he is going to talk to us all about this cool thing that’s coming, the total solar eclipse. Can you please give him a round of applause . . . "

Jackson is traveling around Idaho this summer to talk to kids and adults about the eclipse.

Economic Innovation Group

The Economic Innovation Group is a Washington D.C.-based research and advocacy group focused on the decline of entrepreneurship and rising income inequality. Policy director John Lettieri says despite a popular narrative that disruption and change is constant in the business world, entrepreneurship across the country is actually quite static.

Lettieri says low job turnover, employment in startup companies and slow migration patterns represent that something fundamental is changing in the economy.

Mary Esch / AP Photo

A new statewide Community Assessment has some dramatic findings, especially for Idaho kids.

The United Way of Treasure Valley released their latest Community Assessment Thursday. Conducted every three years, the research is a snapshot of local issues, from health to education to financial stability.

Rural schools, Idaho County, bus
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Skip Hall has been a teacher at Grangeville High School for 31 years. His early American history class with freshmen and sophomores will be one of his last: he’s retiring at the end of the school year.

As Hall’s class works together on projects, he takes a moment to reflect on the state of education in his district.

“The biggest thing I see is lack of choice for the students," Hall says.

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